Bjørn Visits Daeyoung Chaevi Developer Of 400 kW Chargers

GM To Provide Vehicle For New Extreme 400-kW Fast Charging Initiative Nissan and EVgo Open I-95 Fast Charging ARC Daeyoung Chaevi targets 400 kW chargers, expands to Europe.In one of the most recent episodes, Bjørn Nyland (with support from the Korea Electric Vehicle User Association) takes us to the South Korean company Daeyoung Chaevi, which offers all kind of charging equipment from AC stations to DC chargers – currently multi-standard 50 kW and 200 kW and up to 400 kW starting next year.Daeyoung Chaevi is maybe not well known to our regular site visitors, but it sells a lot of chargers in South Korea, China and Japan. The new important market soon will be Europe and that explains why the company invited Bjørn.Fast charging news Daeyoung Chaevi website: here. Fortum Opens First HPC Fast Charger In Sweden Beside chargers, Daeyoung Chaevi will supply power modules (power electronics) for chargers produced by other OEMs.According to the interview with Daeyoung Chaevi’s representatives, those chargers are reliable, compact, can withstand low temperatures like -30°C and have pretty cool long cables with a special management system that helps to keep them above ground. There is one more advantage… affordable price compared to competitors, but no price was mentioned. Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 11, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

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A close look at Tesla Model 3s new roof rack with efficiency

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Tesla finally launched a roof rack for Model 3 a month ago and some owners are starting to get some use out of it.Here’s a close look at the Tesla Model 3’s new roof rack with an efficiency test. more…The post A close look at Tesla Model 3’s new roof rack with efficiency test appeared first on Electrek.last_img

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Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer PHEV Gets 43 Miles Of EV Range Video

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Mitsubishi Dendo Drive House (DDH).embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Press release:MITSUBISHI ENGELBERG TOURER MAKES GLOBAL PREMIERE AT 2019 GENEVA MOTOR SHOWMitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) is giving the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer new-generation crossover SUV its global premiere at the 89th Geneva International Motor Show. Embodying the “Drive your Ambition” corporate global tagline, the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer uses MMC’s advanced electrification and all-wheel control technologies to raise SUV appeal to a new level.MMC will also be giving demonstrations of the Dendo Drive House (DDH), a new energy ecosystem allowing owners to generate, store and transfer energy automatically between their cars and the home, enhancing the value of electric vehicles. DDH will be available to customers when they buy an EV/PHEV at a Mitsubishi Motors dealership and is a Vehicle to Home (V2H) based system that MMC plans to start offering in Japan and Europe from 2019.MITSUBISHI ENGELBERG TOURERNamed after the famous ski resort in central region of Switzerland, best known for its panoramic views, well-groomed runs and challenging off-piste skiing and snowboarding, the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer is a Twin Motor, 4WD, Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) which delivers high levels of performance in the most challenging weather conditions and on all road surfaces. It combines this with the long cruising range inherent to the PHEV, allowing journeys out of town and to places with no charging infrastructure. Packaged to combine passenger capacity with flexible luggage space, the Engelberg Tourer encourages family and friends to go further together, taking a step beyond anything they have experienced before.The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer has been designed as an elegant and functional all-purpose crossover SUV, with bodywork styled to effuse powerfulness and Mitsubishi’s renowned reliability. Enhancing its qualities as an SUV for a more active type of lifestyle, the Engelberg Tourer is fitted with LED fog lamps that are located on an auto-open/close roof box and skid plates for front and rear bumpers. The interior offers generous cabin space for passengers seated in all three rows, with an emphasis on comfort, quality, functionality and attention to detail.The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer uses MMC’s Twin Motor full-time, four-wheel drive system with high-output, high-efficiency motors driving the front and rear axles. Employing knowhow garnered with the Lancer Evolution series, the system uses Active Yaw Control (AYC) to tailor torque split between the front wheels, enhanced by the feeling of acceleration inherent to electric motor drive which delivers maximum torque in an instant. Torque split control between the front wheels improves driving performance to deliver a level of nimble and satisfying handling not expected in this size of car. It also increases stability by reducing wheel slip on unpaved or snow-covered roads to ensure that maximum drive torque is transmitted to the road surface.These components are used together with MMC’s integrated vehicle behavior control system, Super All-Wheel Control (S-AWC), which improves dynamic performance when accelerating, cornering and stopping by controlling the braking force at each wheel and the front and rear motor output.Its 2.4-litre petrol engine, specifically designed for the PHEV system, not only offers powerful and smooth performance, but in series-hybrid mode can act as a high-output generator to achieve a high regeneration rate, while the larger displacement makes for more refined operation and better fuel efficiency, aided by technologies such as drag-reducing radiator grille shutters.The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer has an EV cruising range of over 43 miles/70 km (WLTP cycle) and with a fully charged battery and full fuel tank it has a total cruising range of over 434 miles/700 km (WLTP). This means that both driver and passengers can enjoy the smooth, powerful and quiet EV driving experience for longer distances.Dendo Drive House (DDH)The Dendo Drive House (DDH) is a packaged system comprising the EV/PHEV, a bi-directional charger, solar panels and home battery which is designed for domestic use. This is a one-stop service available at Mitsubishi dealerships that bundles together the sale, installation and after-care of the system and components.Customers can reduce fuel costs by using solar panels to generate power during the day for charging EV/PHEV and domestic storage batteries, while at night, they can reduce power costs by using a bi-directional charger to supply power from their EV/PHEV to the home. This also contributes to the creation of a low-carbon society by using the electricity generated by solar panels to power domestic appliances or to provide the power to operate the EV/PHEV.DDH even provides an emergency power source that can supply power from the EV/PHEV or storage battery to run appliances in the home.Mitsubishi Motors is working to enhance and convenience customers’ lives through the electrification of vehicles. When moving, Mitsubishi’s electric vehicles respond faithfully to their driver’s intentions but even when parked, they are no less faithful and dependable. Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 5, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer Electric SUV Teased That’s not the only improvements ], as the Engelberg Tourer Concept has primarily three-row seating and seems pretty spacious with a flat floor. Interesting is the roof box with LED fog lights.“The Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer has been designed as an elegant and functional all-purpose crossover SUV, with bodywork styled to effuse powerfulness and Mitsubishi’s renowned reliability. Enhancing its qualities as an SUV for a more active type of lifestyle, the Engelberg Tourer is fitted with LED fog lamps that are located on an auto-open/close roof box and skid plates for front and rear bumpers. The interior offers generous cabin space for passengers seated in all three rows, with an emphasis on comfort, quality, functionality and attention to detail.”Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer Concept specs:all-electric range of 70 km (43 miles) in WLTP cycletotal cruising range of over 700 km (434 miles) in WLTP cycle2.4-litre petrol engine, specifically designed for the PHEV system Mitsubishi To Debut Engelberg Tourer Electric SUV Concept In Genevacenter_img Dendo Drive House (DDH)Additional feature is bi-directional energy transfer through CHAdeMO inlet – more on that below. Mitsubishi presents the Engelberg Tourer Concept along Dendo Drive House (DDH) energy ecosystem (Vehicle to Home (V2H) type).DDH combines plug-in cars with bi-directional chargers, home solar and energy storage system and other electrical appliances. Plug-in hybrid cars could improve overall efficiency as well as take role of emergency power source.Sales of the DDH system to start in Japan and Europe in 2019.“The Dendo Drive House (DDH) is a packaged system comprising the EV/PHEV, a bi-directional charger, solar panels and home battery which is designed for domestic use. This is a one-stop service available at Mitsubishi dealerships that bundles together the sale, installation and after-care of the system and components.Customers can reduce fuel costs by using solar panels to generate power during the day for charging EV/PHEV and domestic storage batteries, while at night, they can reduce power costs by using a bi-directional charger to supply power from their EV/PHEV to the home. This also contributes to the creation of a low-carbon society by using the electricity generated by solar panels to power domestic appliances or to provide the power to operate the EV/PHEV.DDH even provides an emergency power source that can supply power from the EV/PHEV or storage battery to run appliances in the home.” Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Sales In 2018 Increased To 42,337 22 photos A plug-in Mitsubishi for that’s for explorers.Mitsubishi presents at the Geneva Motor Show the plug-in hybrid SUV for adventurers. Meet the Mitsubishi Engelberg Tourer Concept – the “new-generation crossover SUV”, which hints at upcoming improvements to the PHEV system known from the Outlander PHEV.The Japanese manufacturer named the latest concept after the famous ski resort in the central region of Switzerland and equipped it with higher capacity battery pack (without disclosing the exact number). The all-electric range under the WLTP test cycle increased to 70 km (43 miles), which is significantly more than the 45 km (28 miles) in the Outlander PHEV.With a total range of over 700 km (434 miles) and all-wheel drive, this Mitsubishi could be a perfect choice for journeys out of town and to places with no charging infrastructure.Mitsubishi newslast_img read more

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Researchers identify new regulator in breast cancer cells

first_imgAug 6 2018Triple-negative breast cancer is a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer. Here, important receptors are missing, which often serve as targets for treatments. Thus, these tumors are unlikely to respond to current therapies. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) in Jena now identified the protein TRPS1, which is commonly overexpressed in these tumors. When TRPS1 is down-regulated, tumor growth decreases whereas survival rates increase. This is a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of this aggressive form of breast cancer. The results have now been published in the journal Nature Communications.Every day, billions of “old” cells get replaced by “new” cells in our body. Maintaining this balance between cell division and cell death is of great importance, as even small irregularities in tissue homeostasis can sooner or later lead to cancer or premature aging. The Hippo pathway plays an important role in the regeneration of tissues but also in the development of cancer. The protein YAP (Yes-associated protein) controls tissue growth and organ size. YAP acts as coactivator and it is responsible for controlling the transcription of specific genes from DNA to mRNA.Previous studies have shown the cancer-promoting role of YAP, which results in uncontrolled cell division. However, there are certain tumor types, such as breast or colorectal cancer, where an increased activity of the YAP protein surprisingly increases the survival prognosis of cancer patients. Until now, it remained unclear, why the YAP activity differs, it is decreased in certain tissues and tumor types and what mechanisms underlie this phenomenon.Researchers around Dr. Björn von Eyss, junior group leader at the Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) in Jena, now investigated in collaboration with colleagues of the Francis Crick Institute in London, UK and the University Würzburg, how YAP activity is regulated in breast cancer. The results are now published in the journal Nature Communications.TRPS1 regulates YAP activityMany signal pathways are important regulators of YAP activity, sometimes even independently of the Hippo pathway. “This is why we conducted a genome-wide CRISPR screening, to identify new regulators of YAP in an unbiased fashion”, says Dana Elster, PhD student in the von Eyss Lab. With this method, the researchers were able to identify the protein TRPS1 (Trichorhinophalangeal Syndrome 1). For YAP-dependent transcription it acts as repressor, inhibiting the expression of many YAP target genes in breast cancer cells. “TRPS1 occupies a large number of genomic sites that are actually regulated by the YAP protein and impedes the transcriptional program”, explains Dr. Björn von Eyss. This suppresses YAP-dependent functions such as the transcription of YAP target genes.Related StoriesStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerIf TRPS1 is increased in tumors, such as triple-negative breast cancer, a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer, the patients’ survival probability decreases. This implies an oncogenic effect of the protein. The results also show a relationship between the two proteins TRPS1 and YAP: If the activity of TRPS1 is increased in the tumor cells, YAP activity is down-regulated. This favors tumor growth and results in a worse survival prognosis of the breast cancer patients.TRPS1 tricks the immune systemFurthermore, the researchers found out that this mechanism reduces the number of immune cells within tumors. Such cells are important, because they can fight tumors from “the inside”. TRPS1 tricks the immune system and evades the immune defense. If TRSP1 is down-regulated, the immune system regains activity and it recognizes the tumor to fight it.The researchers hypothesize that breast cancer cells need to maintain a certain level of YAP activity that is high enough to maintain the oncogenic functions of YAP, but low enough to evade immunosurveillance. “The role of TRPS1 could therefore be important to maintain a specific level of YAP-activity”, says Dr. Björn von Eyss. This underlines the important role of this protein for therapeutic treatments against cancer.”We will now investigate if our results can lead to new therapeutic treatments for breast cancer patients, whose prognoses are rather poor”, explains von Eyss. The development of a new mouse model already was an important step in order to further investigate the discovered mechanism. This approach is also promising for other fields: The research group of Dr. Björn von Eyss has first indications that TRPS1 is playing a role in the aging process. In future research, they thus want to investigate more in detail which age-associated changes are influenced by this factor. Perhaps this will soon make our tissues fitter in old age.Source: https://www.leibniz-fli.de/last_img read more

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New wearable ultrasound device tracks blood pressure deep inside the body

first_img Source:http://jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=2627 Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 12 2018A new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision. In tests, the patch performed as well as some clinical methods to measure blood pressure.Applications include real-time, continuous monitoring of blood pressure changes in patients with heart or lung disease, as well as patients who are critically ill or undergoing surgery. The patch uses ultrasound, so it could potentially be used to non-invasively track other vital signs and physiological signals from places deep inside the body.A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego describe their work in a paper published Sept. 11 in Nature Biomedical Engineering.”Wearable devices have so far been limited to sensing signals either on the surface of the skin or right beneath it. But this is like seeing just the tip of the iceberg,” said Sheng Xu, a professor of nanoengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and the corresponding author of the study. “By integrating ultrasound technology into wearables, we can start to capture a whole lot of other signals, biological events and activities going on way below the surface in a non-invasive manner.””We are adding a third dimension to the sensing range of wearable electronics,” said Xu, who is also affiliated with the Center for Wearable Sensors at UC San Diego.The new ultrasound patch can continuously monitor central blood pressure in major arteries as deep as four centimeters (more than one inch) below the skin.Physicians involved with the study say the technology would be useful in various inpatient procedures.”This has the potential to be a great addition to cardiovascular medicine,” said Dr. Brady Huang, a co-author on the paper and radiologist at UC San Diego Health. “In the operating room, especially in complex cardiopulmonary procedures, accurate real-time assessment of central blood pressure is needed–this is where this device has the potential to supplant traditional methods.”A convenient alternative to clinical methodsThe device measures central blood pressure–which differs from the blood pressure that’s measured with an inflatable cuff strapped around the upper arm, known as peripheral blood pressure. Central blood pressure is the pressure in the central blood vessels, which send blood directly from the heart to other major organs throughout the body. Medical experts consider central blood pressure more accurate than peripheral blood pressure and also say it’s better at predicting heart disease.Measuring central blood pressure isn’t typically done in routine exams, however. The state-of-the-art clinical method is invasive, involving a catheter inserted into a blood vessel in a patient’s arm, groin or neck and guiding it to the heart.A non-invasive method exists, but it can’t consistently produce accurate readings. It involves holding a pen-like probe, called a tonometer, on the skin directly above a major blood vessel. To get a good reading, the tonometer must be held steady, at just the right angle and with the right amount of pressure each time. But this can vary between tests and different technicians.Related StoriesNew ACC/AHA guidelines could improve detection of gestational hypertensionMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorBlood pressure self-monitoring can help patients with hypertension to stick with exercise program”It’s highly operator-dependent. Even with the proper technique, if you move the tonometer tip just a millimeter off, the data get distorted. And if you push the tonometer down too hard, it’ll put too much pressure on the vessel, which also affects the data,” said co-first author Chonghe Wang, a nanoengineering graduate student at UC San Diego. Tonometers also require the patient to sit still–which makes continuous monitoring difficult–and are not sensitive enough to get good readings through fatty tissue.The UC San Diego-led team has developed a convenient alternative–a soft, stretchy ultrasound patch that can be worn on the skin and provide accurate, precise readings of central blood pressure each time, even while the user is moving. And it can still get a good reading through fatty tissue.The patch was tested on a male subject, who wore it on the forearm, wrist, neck and foot. Tests were performed both while the subject was stationary and during exercise. Recordings collected with the patch were more consistent and precise than recordings from a commercial tonometer. The patch recordings were also comparable to those collected with a traditional ultrasound probe.Making ultrasound wearable”A major advance of this work is it transforms ultrasound technology into a wearable platform. This is important because now we can start to do continuous, non-invasive monitoring of major blood vessels deep underneath the skin, not just in shallow tissues,” said Wang.The patch is a thin sheet of silicone elastomer patterned with what’s called an “island-bridge” structure–an array of small electronic parts (islands) that are each connected by spring-shaped wires (bridges). Each island contains electrodes and devices called piezoelectric transducers, which produce ultrasound waves when electricity passes through them. The bridges connecting them are made of thin, spring-like copper wires. The island-bridge structure allows the entire patch to conform to the skin and stretch, bend and twist without compromising electronic function.The patch uses ultrasound waves to continuously record the diameter of a pulsing blood vessel located as deep as four centimeters below the skin. This information then gets translated into a waveform using customized software. Each peak, valley and notch in the waveform, as well as the overall shape of the waveform, represents a specific activity or event in the heart. These signals provide a lot of detailed information to doctors assessing a patient’s cardiovascular health. They can be used to predict heart failure, determine if blood supply is fine, etc.Next stepsResearchers note that the patch still has a long way to go before it reaches the clinic. Improvements include integrating a power source, data processing units and wireless communication capability into the patch.”Right now, these capabilities have to be delivered by wires from external devices. If we want to move this from benchtop to bedside, we need to put all these components on board,” said Xu.The team is looking to collaborate with experts in data processing and wireless technologies for the next phase of the project.last_img read more

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West Antarctic Ice Sheet Is Collapsing

Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A disaster may be unfolding—in slow motion. Earlier this week, two teams of scientists reported that the Thwaites Glacier, a keystone holding the massive West Antarctic Ice Sheet together, is starting to collapse. In the long run, they say, the entire ice sheet is doomed, which would release enough meltwater to raise sea levels by more than 3 meters.One team combined data on the recent retreat of the 182,000-square-kilometer Thwaites Glacier with a model of the glacier’s dynamics to forecast its future. In a paper published online today in Science, they report that in as few as 2 centuries Thwaites Glacier’s outermost edge will recede past an underwater ridge now stalling its retreat. Their modeling suggests that the glacier will then cascade into rapid collapse. The second team, writing in Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), describes recent radar mapping of West Antarctica’s glaciers and confirms that the 600-meter-deep ridge is the final obstacle before the bedrock underlying the glacier dips into a deep basin.Because inland basins connect Thwaites Glacier to other major glaciers in the region, both research teams say its collapse would flood West Antarctica with seawater, prompting a near-complete loss of ice in the area. “The next stable state for the West Antarctic Ice Sheet might be no ice sheet at all,” says the Science paper’s lead author, glaciologist Ian Joughin of the University of Washington (UW), Seattle. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email “Very crudely, we are now committed to global sea level rise equivalent to a permanent Hurricane Sandy storm surge,” says glaciologist Richard Alley of Pennsylvania State University, University Park, referring to the storm that ravaged the Caribbean and the U.S. East Coast in 2012. Alley was not involved in either study.Where Thwaites Glacier meets the Amundsen Sea, deep warm water burrows under the ice sheet’s base, forming an ice shelf from which icebergs break off. When melt and iceberg creation outpace fresh snowfall farther inland, the glacier shrinks. According to the radar mapping released today in GRL from the European Remote Sensing satellite, from 1992 to 2011 the Thwaites Glacier retreated 14 kilometers at its core. “Nowhere else in Antarctica is changing this fast,” says UW Seattle glaciologist Benjamin Smith, co-author of the Science paper.To forecast Thwaites Glacier’s fate, the team plugged satellite and aircraft radar maps of the glacier’s ice and underlying bedrock into a computer model. In simulations that assumed various melting trends, the model accurately reproduced recent ice-loss measurements and churned out a disturbing result: In all but the most conservative melt scenarios, a glacial collapse has already started and will accelerate rapidly once the glacier’s “grounding line”—the point at which the ice begins to float—retreats past the ridge.At that point, the glacier’s face will become taller and, like a towering sand pile, more prone to collapse. The retreat will then accelerate to more than 5 kilometers per year, the team says. “On a glacial timescale, 200 to 500 years is the blink of an eye,” Joughin says.And once Thwaites is gone, the rest of West Antarctica would be at risk.Eric Rignot, a climate scientist at the University of California, Irvine, and the lead author of the GRL radar mapping study, is skeptical of Joughin’s timeline because the computer model used estimates of future melting rates instead of calculations based on physical processes such as changing sea temperatures. “These simulations ought to go to the next stage and include realistic ocean forcing,” he says. If they do, he says, they might predict an even more rapid retreat.Antarctic history confirms the danger, Alley says: Core samples drilled into the inland basins that connect Thwaites Glacier with its neighbors have revealed algae preserved beneath the ice sheet, a hint that seawater has filled the basins within the past 750,000 years. That past flooding shows that modest climate warming can cause the entire ice sheet to collapse. “The possibility that we have already committed to 3 or more meters of sea level rise from West Antarctica will be disquieting to many people, even if the rise waits centuries before arriving.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country read more

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Watch a zebra turn its tail into a surprisingly effective fly swatter

first_imgNEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA—Whether on an African savanna or a feedlot in Texas, mammals are plagued by myriad insect pests: mosquitoes with malaria parasites, tsetse flies spreading African sleeping sickness, horseflies transmitting rinderpest. And in their defense, giraffes, zebras, cows, and the like depend on their tails to swish the insects away. Now, mechanical engineers have discovered just how good these rear-end fly swatters actually are. To find out, they filmed 19 videos of swishing tails from six species, analyzing how fast the tails moved and how their movements changed after insects landed. They discovered that these mammals put a lot of effort into shooing away would-be biters, swinging their tails three times faster than a gravity-driven pendulum, the team reports today at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. The tail works like a double pendulum in that it swishes from where it sticks out of the butt and then from another pivot point where the bone and skin part of the tail ends and the hair begins (see video above). Because of that second pivot, the tip can swing at a different speed or even direction than the rest of the tail. This flexibility enables the animal to interrupt its swishing and use both pivot points to take aim and powerfully swat the intruder before it has a chance to bite. Now that they know how the natural swatter works, the team says they might be able to one day build prosthetic tail tips for animals that lose theirs.last_img read more

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Scientist tells her story in latest partisan battle on House science panel

first_img Deborah Swackhamer made sure to follow the rules before giving testimony last month to Congress on the role of science in setting policy at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). But her caution didn’t prevent her from being caught in the crossfire of another partisan clash between Republicans and Democrats on the science committee of the U.S. House of Representatives.A professor emerita at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Swackhamer is chair of EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC), an external panel that advises the agency’s science office. But when the science committee’s Democrats invited her to a 23 May hearing on state involvement in EPA regulation setting, she told them she would appear only as a private citizen and would focus on how science helps the agency do its job.Swackhamer ran that plan by senior officials in EPA’s science office, and they seemed to be fine with that distinction, spelling out some ground rules for her to follow. She agreed, then accepted the committee’s invitation and submitted her testimony. But on 22 May, one day before the hearing, Ryan Jackson, chief of staff to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, emailed her to suggest changes to that testimony. Jackson also said that her statement needed to be vetted by the agency’s congressional affairs office. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Scientist tells her story in latest partisan battle on House science panel Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Deborah Swackhamer testifies last month before the House of Representatives science committee. House Science Committee Democrats center_img By Jeffrey MervisJun. 28, 2017 , 5:45 PM Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Swackhamer declined to alter her remarks, saying the request infringed on her ability to present her views to Congress. “I thought my comments were factual, so I did not use his talking points,” she tells ScienceInsider. She was shocked that Jackson had even seen the testimony, because committee staff had assured her that it was embargoed until the hearing. (It is not typical practice for congressional committees to share with federal agencies the testimony of witnesses prior to a hearing.)The next day, none of the lawmakers attending the hearing asked her about the exchanges between her and Jackson. Swackhamer said her piece about the importance of science in helping EPA make decisions and thought that was the end of that.Partisan name-callingNot a chance. This past Monday, more than a month after the uneventful hearing, committee Democrats announced they had asked the agency’s inspector general, an in-house watchdog, “to investigate potentially illegal attempts by senior EPA officials, particularly Ryan T. Jackson, the EPA’s Chief of Staff, to interfere with Democratic witness, Dr. Deborah Swackhamer’s, testimony to the Science Committee last month.”In their letter to Arthur Elkins, panel Democrats asserted that “the ability of both federal officials and private citizens to freely communicate with Congress without fear of intimidation, interference, or reprisal is a bipartisan issue that is critical to ensuring good governance and uncovering issues of potential waste, fraud, abuse, or mismanagement.” The Democrats also wrote to Pruitt, telling him of their concerns.The New York Times and other media reported the news, citing relevant emails that Swackhamer had shared with the Democrats. The stories also contained a statement from the chairman of the science committee, Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), upbraiding Democrats for “politicizing what seems to be nothing more than a federal agency making sure that information provided to Congress is accurate.”Within hours, Smith had upped the political ante by putting out his own press release. His account of the incident included what he says is the “full email exchange between Jackson and Schwackhamer [sic].” Oddly, those emails seem to confirm what Swackhamer says she was told by EPA officials, and raise questions about Jackson’s actions.“Deb Swackhamer did reach out to us on 15 May,” Robert Kavlock, acting head of the science office, wrote in a 22 May email to Jackson. Kavlock then summarized the advice she was given. “Since you would be speaking in your personal capacity, you cannot speak on behalf of EPA nor can you share any nonpublic information. Additionally, if you mention your role on the BOSC you should also include other relevant details from your resume that highlight your achievements as a scientist.”Smith’s press release essentially accuses the Democrats and Swackhamer of colluding against him. “The Minority and Swackhamer contend that the testimony she provided to the Committee was done so solely in her personal capacity and not as the Chair of the BOSC. [But] the true intent of this testimony was to criticize Administrator Pruitt’s evaluation of the BOSC rather than discuss state involvement of EPA rulemaking.”The “evaluation” that Smith cites is a reference to Pruitt’s decision in late April to break with precedent and not reappoint nine of the 18 members of BOSC whose 3-year terms had expired. Pruitt said the agency wanted to cast a broad net before choosing its next set of advisers. The scientists being cut loose were free to reapply, he added.Swackhamer was quick to criticize Pruitt’s decision once the news got out. She told reporters it was part of a larger effort to “promote deregulation” at EPA by muting the impact of scientists on its regulatory decisions. Since then, Pruitt has decided to part ways with an additional 38 people who serve on five subcommittees that report to BOSC. By Swackhamer’s tally, EPA’s roster of 68 experts will dwindle to 11 by 1 September, at which point the BOSC itself will have only three members.That drastic reduction in capacity is her real concern. “I’m sorry that it’s gotten so political,” says Swackhamer, whose 3-year term runs until next spring, at which point she hopes to be reappointed to a second term. “My main message is that EPA can’t meet its mission without robust science. And that requires both doing good science and making use of expert external review, which is what BOSC provides.”last_img read more

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Trump adds physicist Will Happer climate science critic to White House staff

first_imgWill Happer at a conference in 2016 By Hannah Northey, E&E NewsSep. 5, 2018 , 8:45 AM When asked about his new NSC role, Happer said he would do his best to ensure that federal policy decisions “are based on sound science and technology.”An emeritus physics professor at Princeton University and a former Energy Department official under former President George H.W. Bush’s administration in the 1990s, Happer is well-known for his public criticism of mainstream climate modeling and his ties to the Trump administration.Happer last year was considered a leading candidate to head the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and met with the president in Trump Tower before the inauguration. Happer told E&E News in an interview earlier this year that Trump asked him about Russia during that meeting (Climatewire, 25 January).Happer told The Scientist that the significance of climate change has been “tremendously exaggerated” and has “become sort of a cult movement in the last five or 10 years.” Happer also said President Trump, who has referred to climate change as a Chinese hoax, agreed with his assessment.More recently, Happer has appeared in internal emails obtained under the Freedom of Information Act advising the Trump administration’s efforts to challenge mainstream climate science, including assembling and vetting proposed participants for former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s “red-team, blue-team” debate (Climatewire, 10 May).Happer, who is not a climate scientist by training, is known in physics for his development in the 1980s of the sodium guide star that was initially used for missile defense technology and has now gained broader application in astronomy. According to his Princeton bio, he’s credited as one of the pioneers in the field of optically polarized atoms.But his criticism of climate science stands out.Happer has accused both NOAA and NASA of manipulating temperature records and claimed that higher concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere would accentuate plant life, citing satellite data showing a greening of the planet.”The public, in general, doesn’t realize that from the point of view of geological history, we are in a CO2 famine,” he told E&E News during the interview in January. Originally published by E&E NewsWilliam Happer, a physics professor and vocal critic of mainstream climate science, has joined the White House as a top adviser.Happer, 79, told E&E News in email that he began serving yesterday on the National Security Council as the senior director for emerging technologies. NSC officials confirmed Happer’s new role but declined to provide further detail about the appointment, which CNN first reported. Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0) Many researchers say other impacts of climate change, such as rising temperatures and changing rainfall patterns, have a negative impact on plant life and that higher CO2 levels may not be a boon to all plants, even in the short term.Happer told E&E News in January that he supported Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord but said he wished the president had focused on how the agreement “did not make scientific sense.” Trump had cast the pact as detrimental to the U.S. economy.”There is no problem from CO2,” Happer said. “The world has lots and lots of problems, but increasing CO2 is not one of the problems. So [the accord] dignifies it by getting all these yahoos who don’t know a damn thing about climate saying, ‘This is a problem, and we’re going to solve it.’ All this virtue signaling. You can read about it in the Bible: Pharisees and hypocrites and phonies.”Reporter Robin Bravender contributed.Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2018. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email There is no problem from CO2. The world has lots and lots of problems, but increasing CO2 is not one of the problems. Will Happer Read more… Trump adds physicist Will Happer, climate science critic, to White House stafflast_img read more

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Our favorite Science photos of 2018

first_imgSign up for our daily newsletterCountryCountry *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, the Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote d’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinePanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy.Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emaillast_img read more

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We may have helped give our canine pals puppy dog eyes

first_imgThe team suspects that early in dog evolution humans were more likely to care for canines with this look, perhaps because it reminded them of the big eyes of human infants. Those dogs had more pups, and so the muscles that power big eyes spread through dog populations. Even today, shelter dogs that rock the look are more likely to find a home. The next question: whether other domestic animals like cats have hit on the same strategy. Sarah Bickel By David GrimmJun. 17, 2019 , 3:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Dog owners know the look: Your pooch stares up at you, eyes wide, and you can’t resist giving them a hug or favorite treat. A new study of dog facial anatomy suggests we may have helped create this expression by favoring canines with “puppy dog eyes” over the course of thousands of years of dog evolution.To conduct the work, researchers dissected the remains of four wolves and six dogs, focusing on their faces. They spotted two striking differences: The levator anguli oculi medialis muscle, which raises the eyebrows, was highly developed in all of the dogs but barely there in wolves. And all dogs except a Siberian husky—an ancient breed—sported a robust retractor anguli oculi lateralis muscle, which widens the eyes by pulling the eyelids towards the ears. This muscle was mostly absent in the wolves.Combined, the two muscles allow dogs to express the big, sad eyes that melt our hearts, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And indeed, when the researchers asked strangers to approach a number of shelter dogs and tame wolves, the dogs produced the sad eye look—known scientifically as “the AU101 movement”—on average five times more often and with far more intensity than the wolves did. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email We may have helped give our canine pals ‘puppy dog eyes’ Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

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A prescription for Madagascars broken health system data and a focus on

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country 2017 0 By Leslie RobertsFeb. 28, 2019 , 2:00 PM Reporting and photography for this story were supported by the Pulitzer Center.IFANADIANA IN MADAGASCAR—Matt Bonds was young and idealistic when, as a postdoc, he set out with economist Jeffrey Sachs, a rock star in the development world, in his quest to end poverty. But the Millennium Villages Project on which they worked—a package of interventions from seeds to schools to clinics designed to improve livelihoods and health in impoverished African villages—came under withering criticism, including for a research design that made it impossible to gauge the project’s impact. Sachs, of Columbia University, was excoriated and Bonds, who was skeptical of the methodology from the start, was deeply frustrated. 2017 In 2014, 81% of births took place at home, well above the national average of 57%—and only 20% were assisted by a trained midwife. Women here had an average of 6.9 children, as opposed to about five countrywide. Just one-third of children over age 2 were fully vaccinated. And although food scarcity is not considered a problem here, half the children were stunted, 21% severely so.“Not rocket science”When PIVOT started to work in the fall of 2014, it found a health system in tatters. A national plan calls for a three-tier system. For each fokontany, a cluster of remote villages with about 1000 people, the plan specifies two volunteer health workers. Each commune (there are 14 here) is supposed to have a primary health center staffed with three clinicians—a doctor, a nurse, and a midwife—as well as a pharmacy and a maternity ward, serving about 15,000. There is one hospital for the entire district. But when PIVOT arrived, almost none of that was functioning.In the fokontany, community health workers were an infrequent presence at best, with little training and minimal or no supervision or support. The crumbling commune health centers looked like Soviet-era prisons and were about one-third staffed. If a patient made the long walk from the village and was lucky enough to find the center open, it was likely out of drugs because the pharmacist hadn’t been paid and hadn’t shown up. And the hospital, Bonds says, “was where you went to die.”PIVOT’s strategy is to work with the government to shore up its system rather than impose its own vision of what a model health system should look like. That means, as much as possible, following government policies, although 4 years in project leaders are chafing at those limits.”It’s not rocket science,” Robin Herrnstein says. “The biggest problems [killing children] are acute respiratory infections, malaria, and diarrhea. They are simple to treat. But you have to implement them all in one setting, and the second one piece breaks, you are done.”PIVOT made some district-wide changes right away—for example, hiring doctors and other staff at the 13 health centers and the hospital and training them in everything from obstetrics to infection control. Without PIVOT’s intervention, “the health centers would be closed,” says Andriamihaja Randrianambinina, who oversees health care here. They added an ambulance system and a team of social workers to help patients navigate the unfamiliar health system. The group also set up its extensive monitoring and evaluation program, collecting data from every remote health post, commune health center, and the hospital on every patient seen and cent spent. He was still young and idealistic when, at age 32, he went to Rwanda to join Harvard University’s Paul Farmer, whose work with Partners In Health (PIH) was immortalized in Tracy Kidder’s book, Mountains Beyond Mountains. In Haiti, Farmer and PIH co-founder Jim Yong Kim pioneered an innovative approach to bring health care to people who had nothing. Now, PIH was helping the Rwandan government rebuild its health system, which had been shattered by the 1994 genocide. Km One of the biggest barriers to health in Madagascar is simply the terrain. The same stunning geography that gave rise to such unparalleled speciation has left people isolated in remote villages, far from any clinic. Here in Ifanadiana district where PIVOT works, half the population lives in communities that can be reached only by foot or motorbike, hours or days off the main road.And there are few outside dollars to help. Donors have long been reluctant to invest because of the country’s history of political turmoil and corruption, and a 2009 coup cemented those fears. Madagascar became an international pariah, ineligible for foreign aid, and annual per capita spending on health plummeted to $14, the lowest in the world. After democratic elections in 2013, foreign aid began to trickle in again, and humanitarian groups have returned to parts of the country.Crazy connectionsPIVOT came about through a web of “crazy connections,” as Robin Herrnstein describes it, at the center of which is primatologist Patricia Wright. Thirty years ago, in a remote montane rainforest in southeastern Madagascar, Wright discovered one lemur species and rediscovered another thought to be extinct. She persuaded the government to create Ranomafana National Park to preserve the rainforest and her beloved lemurs, and now splits her time between the research station she runs there, Centre ValBio, and SUNY Stony Brook. In 2009, Wright was looking for money for a new building at the research station when she was introduced to the Herrnsteins.Robin and Jim Herrnstein met at Harvard as graduate students, both studying massive black holes. She went on to Columbia, and he had lined up a job at the University of California, Berkeley. But he changed course when he gave a talk at the secretive and hugely successful quantitative hedge fund Renaissance Technologies on Long Island in New York, where almost all the analysts are physicists, mathematicians, and statisticians. The fast pace and freewheeling intellectual culture drew him in, and he joined the firm. “We had been starving graduate students. Suddenly, we found ourselves in a position to help,” says Robin Herrnstein, who left academia to start a family—one that rapidly expanded when the third child they were expecting turned out to be identical triplets.Wright invited the Herrnsteins to Ranomafana. They were wowed by the rainforest, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with its rich and endangered biodiversity, and the science underway at Centre ValBio. And they were struck by the extreme poverty right next door. “You can’t describe the beauty and the suffering in words,” Robin Herrnstein says.The couple agreed to fund the new building—but only if it included a biosafety level 2 infectious disease lab, “so researchers could study not only lemurs and frogs, but what is affecting the people,” Robin Herrnstein explains. And they began to look for ways to do more. Email A PIVOT team heads to a remote village on a rugged footpath, across many streams and through muddy gullies—the only way to reach most villages in Madagascar. 600 Ranomafana PIVOT co-founder Robin Herrnstein visits with Malagasy children. 2014 Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A prescription for Madagascar’s broken health system: data and a focus on details 2017 At a gala event for SUNY Stony Brook donors, the couple was seated next to the guest of honor, actor Edward Norton, who helps run a conservation project with the Maasai in Kenya. They told him about their still-nascent idea of bringing health care to an isolated corner of Madagascar. “You’ve got to meet my brother-in-law,” responded Norton, who then introduced them by email to Bonds, who is married to Norton’s sister, Molly.Bonds, now 42 and still idealistic, inhabits two worlds, the cerebral and the practical. A theoretical modeler, he made a name for himself with Sachs for his work on how cycles of infectious disease keep people trapped in poverty, and he has spent much of his career since then parsing which of the two comes first. Farmer and PIH helped bring him down to Earth. “It was like jumping off a cliff. … There was nothing I had learned as an economist that shed light on what it actually takes to do stuff,” he recalls. Bonds was still living in Rwanda, where he was gearing up to analyze the data finally coming in to PIH, when the email from his brother-in-law arrived.Bonds said he was too busy to get involved but would be happy to advise the Herrnsteins if he could enlist Michael Rich, a physician at Harvard Medical School who designed the health project in Rwanda.Soon Bonds, Rich, and Jim Herrnstein were on a plane to Madagascar. They visited communities and toured health centers here, which were invariably depressing—dirty, poorly equipped, and distressingly empty. In one they saw a 6- or 7-year-old girl who was unconscious and near death. The health center lacked the intravenous malaria medicine Rich knew she needed, and her father could not afford $20 to rent a car to take her to the hospital 30 kilometers (km) away. Rich and her father rushed her there, only to find an empty emergency room and, again, no medicine. They drove to the nearest town and brought it back. The next day the girl had turned around. “It was dumb luck we were there and able to save her,” Rich says. “We thought, why not always be there?”In 2014, Rich and the three researchers founded PIVOT, with Bonds as CEO and director of research. Wright, Farmer, and Norton’s father, conservation lawyer Edward Norton, serve on the board. PIVOT’s first hire was Tara Loyd, a PIH veteran, who is now executive director. The Herrnsteins committed $5 million for the first 5 years. “The idea is we would give PIVOT a long runway,” Jim Herrnstein explains, “so they will not be overly distracted by fundraising.”Shocking baseline dataPIVOT’s office is a converted two-story stone house perched on a hill here a few minutes’ walk from downtown Ranomafana. Its entire canvas is the Delaware-size district of 200,000 people, an 11-hour drive from Madagascar’s brightly colored and terribly congested capital Antananarivo. Ifanadiana is dotted with some 1000 villages, with their distinctive houses of mud and thatch, connected by a maze of footpaths, and 14 towns. People here live off the land, and market stalls are piled high with pineapples, cassava, bananas, and rice.Before PIVOT started any interventions, the team set out to gather a detailed snapshot of the health and socioeconomic conditions in the district. What they found would guide their efforts and serve as a benchmark to measure progress—and might ultimately help make the case that their system-wide approach is effective.To design a baseline study, Bonds turned to his colleague, Harvard Medical School epidemiologist Ann Miller, who in turn teamed up with the National Institute of Statistics (INSTAT) of Madagascar. In April and May 2014, five INSTAT teams conducted face-to-face interviews at 1522 households, visiting each one three times to try to catch everyone living there. As part of the ongoing longitudinal study, INSTAT revisits the same households every 2 years.The results were shocking. “We could see the district was poor, but we didn’t know how bad until we got the baseline data,” Miller says. In 2014, the study showed, one in seven children here never reached their fifth birthday. A woman faced a one in 14 risk of dying in childbirth. Both the maternal mortality and under-5 mortality rates were more than double the national estimate—and nearly twice as high as in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole. 75 6 Nurses at the Ranomafana health center monitor the growth of children for malnutrition. 60 Bonds says that work, in three hard-hit rural districts, was “off the charts successful,” noting that under-5 mortality—a key indicator of population health—dropped 64% in 5 years. But so much was changing in Rwanda at the time—international aid was pouring in, the economy was booming, and strongman President Paul Kagame had restored a tough order—that some questioned how big a role PIH played. “We didn’t have the data” that could document our impact, Bonds laments. “We didn’t have a true baseline. The data system was not in place until 6 years after the project started.”This time, Bonds, a polymath with Ph.D.s in economics and ecology who is now at Harvard Medical School in Boston, is determined to get it right, with meticulous data gathering and rigorous analysis. He is working in a remote district in Madagascar, one of the poorest countries in the world, where maternal and childhood mortality rates are shockingly high and half the children are stunted from chronic malnutrition.With an eclectic group of partners and donors, including two Harvard-trained astrophysicists and a global tuberculosis expert, Bonds co-founded a nongovernmental organization (NGO), PIVOT. Its goal is to devise and test an affordable and effective health care system that could ultimately be scaled up to cover all of Madagascar and, perhaps, be adapted for other countries.Like Sachs and Farmer, Bonds and his colleagues at Boston-based PIVOT are convinced that the single interventions that capture most international dollars, such as bed nets for malaria or targeted HIV/AIDS programs, although essential, are simply not enough. In a place as broken as Madagascar, you must tackle the whole messy health system with all its moving parts. And that means sweating the small stuff along with the big—ensuring there are trained surgeons and essential medicines, but also such quotidian things as gas for the ambulances and a paycheck for the pharmacist. Ifanadiana district 2018 20 2014 2017 20 Percentage covered by PIVOT intervention Testing ground PIVOT started to work in communes along the paved road in Madagascar and plans to extend its activities to all of Ifanadiana district’s 14 communes by 2022. 2022 goal Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) RIJASOLO 2014 Pavedroad Unpavedroadcenter_img Country Director Mohammed Ali Ouenzar and co-founders Jim Herrnstein, Matt Bonds, and Michael Rich (left to right) inspect the ledgers at a local health post as part of PIVOT’s intense focus on data. Madagascar Watch a related video Ifanadiana District Hospital has seen a surge in visits, but not as many as PIVOT leaders hoped. 1000 At the Ifanadiana District Hospital—the third tier of the district’s health system—a tiny girl with enormous eyes shyly follows the visitors around the new malnutrition ward. She’s a big success story: Admitted 21 days ago, she is almost ready to go home. PIVOT managed to convince a skeptical government that malnutrition was so severe that the hospital needed a dedicated ward. “We showed them the data,” Loyd recalls.In other ways, however, the Ifanadiana District Hospital has proved more recalcitrant. “The hospital is a puzzle to me—why the beds are not filled,” Loyd says. PIVOT has built housing so that family members no longer have to sleep outside, renovated the emergency room, and built an isolation ward and a sophisticated diagnostic lab. Between 2014 and 2017, the number of hospital visits surged from 3116 to 5994. Yet still far too few patients come, and when they do, they often come too late or leave too early. “We thought [after removing fees] we would be scrambling for space, two people to a bed,” Loyd says. “Instead, we have two or three people in a ward that can hold 10. … Is it something in the system? The quality of care?”To Loyd, “The problems are all about remoteness and how to build trust in a system where people traditionally went to die. … Rebuilding trust takes years.” Another factor, says PIVOT Country Director Mohammed Ali Ouenzar, is the rural population’s long reliance on traditional healers and ancestral medicine.The next day, Fara Rabemananjara, who heads PIVOT’s team of social workers, takes us to visit a child who left the hospital too early. Three-year-old Charlindo had been admitted 4 months earlier with SAM and fever. His young mother brought him home before he finished treatment—possibly because the family had to work the cassava fields 16 km away. He was admitted again with SAM, typhoid fever, tuberculosis, and severe pneumonia. Recently discharged, the boy is getting weekly checkups at the hospital and at home.The tiny wooden shack where he lives with his mother, grandmother, and three other children is a short walk through an alley, where the stench of sewage is unavoidable. All six family members share one bed, and the family ekes out a living on $2 to $3 a day.Rabemananjara says she is thrilled with how well the boy looks—he has gained almost 1 kilogram since the last visit. To those who haven’t seen him before, however, he looks anything but well. He is stick thin and, more troubling, lacks eye contact and any expression.Intractable geographyPIVOT published the results of its longitudinal assessment, chronicling progress between 2014 and 2016, in June 2018 in BMJ Global Health, 1 month after a study from PIH documenting the impact of its Rwanda program between 2005 to 2010. Bonds and Rich, coauthors on both papers, argue in an editorial that the two projects provide some of the strongest evidence yet that strengthening the health system, rather than taking the piecemeal approach that donors favor, can go far in improving the health of the entire population.In the area where PIH worked in Rwanda, under-5 mortality fell nearly 13% per year between 2005 and 2010. During PIVOT’s first 2 years, the annual decline was almost 9%. These gains were achieved at a cost of just $30 per capita, despite Madagascar’s low economic growth, political volatility, corruption, and scanty health spending. That, say Bonds and Rich, is proof that the Rwanda experiment is indeed replicable in less fortunate places. Bonds says: “If you can do it here, you can do it anywhere.” 2022 goal 10 2017 PIVOT 200 After being treated for severe malnutrition at Ifanadiana District Hospital, this girl is about to go home. Lifetime fertility rate 2022 goal So far, so good Key population health indicators for Ifanadiana district in Madagascar show progress toward ambitious goals. Perhaps PIVOT’s most important change was to remove all fees for patients at the three levels of care. Patients now receive medicines and treatment for free, and PIVOT reimburses the government. It is “incredibly cheap,” Bonds says, costing just $0.90 per patient at the health center, and $10 at the hospital. PIVOT did this largely “under the radar,” Loyd explains. “We didn’t say we were doing universal health care—that would have been too threatening” at the time, she says. “But as we removed the cost of care, that is what we have been doing.” Without PIVOT, Randrianambinina says, “the local people never would have been able to pay.”Then PIVOT focused on its first four communes of about 65,000 people, overhauling care at both the health centers and in the fokontany that feed into them. It plans to expand these efforts to all 14 by 2022.Just getting to the remote villages from the road is a challenge. On a scorching day last May, a PIVOT team reached one of them after a sweaty, 2-hour hike on a slippery, narrow footpath that snaked over hills and descended into gullies so deep the mud sloshed over the tops of our boots. The only way across the many streams was to clamber gingerly across fallen tree trunks. It’s hard to imagine how a woman in labor or someone feverish with pneumonia could make the trek to the health center. And many don’t.The two community health workers proudly show off their new one-room health post, painted cheerful blue and white. The health workers asked for someplace dignified to work, Bonds explains, so PIVOT supplies the building materials, and the community, the labor.PIVOT and the Ministry of Health have trained the health workers in an international protocol for diagnosing and treating major childhood maladies. They now screen every child for malnutrition. Supervisors, a nurse or a midwife, visit each health post every 2 or 3 months to make sure the health workers are following the protocol correctly and provide refresher courses if not. They also collect the ledgers in which the health workers meticulously record each visit, test given, and drug dispensed—data that are fed into PIVOT’s voluminous data base. Those data show that in the past 2 years alone, the number of sick children treated by the community health workers doubled. The main reason, the health workers say, is that care is now free.But the people want more. As we are leaving, the village leader pulls Bonds aside and says the community wants a mobile clinic to visit once a month, a service PIVOT has provided in some villages. Bonds is sympathetic, but for now, PIVOT’s hands are tied. The group has persuaded the government to provide clinics for villages 10 km or more from a health center, but this one is 9 km.The group has also retooled the dysfunctional commune health centers. “This place used to look like a bombshell,” Bonds says, gesturing around the Ranomafana health center, the first of the four to be upgraded. “People only came if they were deathly ill.” PIVOT plastered and painted, added plumbing and latrines, and carted in solar panels. Today, the center is bustling, seeing 50 to 100 patients a day. Before PIVOT, there were two staff members. Now, there are 10 clinicians and two support staff.Each health center now runs an outpatient feeding and treatment program for severe acute malnutrition (SAM), which can quickly become fatal. Each case triggers a home visit from the social team. “One case of SAM is an indicator of more suffering,” Loyd explains.The maternity wards have also been transformed. “Before, if you asked to see them, someone would have pointed you to a rusty bed with no mattress and no sterilized equipment,” Loyd says. “Now, there is a real bed, with a mosquito net. Women have a place to sleep and recover with some dignity. There is a shower and food.” When we visit one such ward, three young women are resting in bed with their swaddled newborns. They say they are thrilled with the care, but they also mention that the staff asked them for “a small gift.” There is clearly more work to do.Glitches aside, in PIVOT’s first 2 years, the number of women delivering babies in health care facilities jumped 63%. Use of health centers for most other types of care tripled. 2022 goal RIJASOLO 25 2014 2 Under-5 mortality per 10,000 A. CUADRA AND N. DESAI/SCIENCE Maternal mortality per 100,000 RIJASOLO 100 Other health system efforts are also underway. But PIVOT’s almost obsessive focus on data sets it apart. PIVOT has been collecting mounds of it from day one, starting with a baseline study of 8000 people, with follow-ups every 2 years, and a monitoring and evaluation program that tracks more than 860 indicators so the team can document what works, fix what doesn’t, and create a model health system that others can replicate.”We wanted it to be done in a scientifically rigorous way,” says Jim Herrnstein, the astrophysicist who, with his astrophysicist wife Robin, are two of the four co-founders of PIVOT and the group’s biggest donors. “This is not a vision of rainbows and ponies.””The degree to which PIVOT measures and holds themselves accountable for impact is remarkable and unusual,” says Peter Small, head of the Global Health Institute at the State University of New York (SUNY) in Stony Brook. And so far, it seems to be paying off. In a paper last spring, PIVOT researchers reported that in just 2 years, under-5 mortality in their pilot area dropped nearly 20% and neonatal mortality fell 36%—results Small calls “impressive.” The analysis has also revealed where improvements have been less dramatic, which has prompted PIVOT to rethink some strategies.With its focus on data and evaluation, “PIVOT is really doing this right,” says Katherine Burke, deputy director of Stanford University’s Center for Innovation in Global Health in Palo Alto, California. “It is addressing all the failures in global health pilot projects.”Stunning beauty, abject povertyThe name Madagascar conjures up images of lush rainforests, ring-tailed lemurs with their impossibly shiny eyes, and chameleons of ever-changing hues. The island is indeed magical, among the hottest of all biodiversity hot spots with as much as 90% of its species found nowhere else on Earth.Yet this biological richness obscures the desperate conditions in this country of 24 million. At least 90% of the original forest is gone, and 90% of Malagasy people live on less than $2 a day. Just 11% of the rural population has access to an improved latrine; 34% to clean water, according to UNICEF. No wonder diarrhea is one of the top killers of children, along with pneumonia and malaria. Malnutrition rates are the fourth highest in the world.Forgotten diseases take a heavy toll: schistosomiasis, filariasis, leprosy, even plague, the Black Death of the Middle Ages, which returns like clockwork every fall—last year in the most fearsome outbreak ever. A data-driven prescription for Madagascar’s broken health system 2019 target N. DESAI/SCIENCE RIJASOLO Ranomafana RIJASOLO 2021–2022 target 2020 target 125 PIVOT researchers are now analyzing the results from year four. They expect to see a steady, positive trend. But as they put a finer lens on the data, they are finding that one problem has remained intractable: geography. “We have a large impact on people who live within 5 km of a health center, but a much smaller impact on people 5 to 10 km from a health center, and zero over 15 km,” Bonds says.The solution, PIVOT leaders say, is to bring more health services to the remote communities rather than the other way around. But they face two huge obstacles: Under the national health strategy, community health workers are unpaid volunteers, and they are not allowed to treat anyone over age 5—the rest must somehow make their way to a health center. “We are leaving the remote population behind,” Bonds says. “Kids 6 or 7 are not getting treated and not making the trek. Why can’t we treat a 6-year-old with malaria?” And, he adds, “You can’t have untrained volunteers be the basis of your health system.”Global momentum is building to strengthen community health worker programs and ensure they are paid a decent salary. At a United Nations–sponsored meeting in October 2018 in Astana, Kazakhstan, World Health Organization member states committed to provide primary care for their citizens. Governments would be hard-pressed to foot the bill, but PIVOT and others believe the international community can help.To see what is possible, PIVOT is piloting a new community health worker program in one of the 14 communes. “We want to get people better trained and pay them more—to professionalize them, so their scope of work can grow a lot” and they can treat older children and adults as well, Bonds says. Recently, the Malagasy government asked PIVOT to be the public face of its new push for universal health coverage, holding up Ifanadiana as a model for the nation. “The scaling up of PIVOT’s effective and efficient intervention is a model for our journey towards universal health coverage,” said then–Minister of Health Yoel Rantomalala.PIVOT continues to expand. Since 2014, PIVOT’s staff has grown to 182, 171 of them Malagasy, making it the largest health NGO in Madagascar. It is now covering about 95,000 people in seven communes—including Ambohimanga du Sud, reachable by an 8-hour tractor ride from Ranomafana—and is moving into its eighth. “The general idea,” Loyd says, “is to remain nimble, keep a presence in Ifanadiana, and try to bring health care to the rest of the island. … We’ve got 24 million [people] to go.”The group’s yearly budget has swelled to $4 million, and other funders have come on board. The Herrnsteins remain the largest donor, and say they are in it for the long haul. Robin Herrnstein says, “We have no exit plan and no plan to have one.”last_img read more

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Trump administration restricts fetal tissue research

first_imgFetal brain tissue is used for federally funded studies of Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases and conditions. After a 9-month review, President Donald Trump’s administration is moving to eliminate some federally funded research that relies on fetal tissue from elective abortions and to more tightly regulate the rest.The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced today that it will no longer allow government scientists working for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to conduct studies that use fetal tissue. Such intramural studies received about $31 million last year.HHS also said university scientists who want NIH funding for such studies must now have each proposal examined by an ethics advisory board. The new policy will not affect currently funded extramural projects; there are about 200 such studies, which received about $84 million in 2018. But the new policy will apply to researchers who apply for a renewal of a current grant or for new grants. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Meredith WadmanJun. 5, 2019 , 2:26 PM The administration is also killing a roughly $2 million annual contract between NIH and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), which for years has used fetal tissue to create mice with humanlike immune systems for HIV drug testing. In its statement announcing the action, HHS declared, “Promoting the dignity of human life from conception to natural death is one of the very top priorities of President Trump’s administration.” A statement from UCSF Chancellor Sam Hawgood, however, called the move “politically motivated, short-sighted and not based on sound science.”Groups that oppose fetal tissue research and had encouraged the Trump administration to undertake the review are applauding the moves. “This is a major pro-life victory and we thank President Trump for taking decisive action. It is outrageous and disgusting that we have been complicit, through our taxpayer dollars, in the experimentation using baby body parts,” said Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, a Washington, D.C., lobbying group that opposes abortion.David Prentice, vice president and research director of the Charlotte Lozier Institute in Arlington, Virginia, the research arm of the Susan B. Anthony list, added: “Our government will now invest in effective research methods that do not rely on the destruction of human life.”Opponents of restrictions on fetal tissue research, which they say plays an important role in understanding diseases and developing treatments, were disappointed. The HHS announcement “is a clear indication that this administration values symbolic statements over research aimed at saving lives,” says Alta Charo, a lawyer and bioethicist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. “It is yet another example of this administration’s determination to ignore evidence when setting policy.”“I think it’s a terrible policy ultimately. If you think about it, fetal tissue will be incinerated instead of using it for valuable research. What’s the sense in that?” says Lawrence Goldstein, a neuroscientist at UC San Diego, who uses human fetal tissue for his work studying Alzheimer’s disease.Under the new policy, extramural researchers who submit applications that pass scientific review and score high enough to be funded will now encounter a new and time-consuming layer of review. Under a procedure described in a 2006 law that governs NIH policy, HHS will need to announce in the Federal Register that it plans to assemble an ethics advisory board to review each proposed grant and invite public nominations for that board. The board would be made up of 14 to 20 people from various backgrounds, including at least one theologian, one ethicist, one physician, and one attorney. No more than half of the panel members can be scientists. The HHS secretary must wait at least 30 days after the publication to appoint the board. The board will then have up to 150 days to recommend to the secretary whether the proposed research should be funded.Even then, the Secretary can overrule the committee if he finds its recommendation “arbitrary and capricious.” “The whole point here is to so wrap the research in red tape that it’s impossible or at least unlikely to be feasible for many researchers to embark on this,” Charo contends.The now-canceled UCSF contract, the latest in a series, has been in place since 2013. It was normally renewed each December; since December 2018 it has been granted two 90-day extensions. The second expires today. As recently as April, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases had indicated it was preparing to grant another 90-day extension.According to HHS, the new ban on fetal tissue research by NIH scientists will end three active projects. Each project will be permitted to use up its current store of fetal tissue before shutting down. One of the projects, at NIH’s Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, was beginning to progress after it was stalled when the Trump administration review was first announced in September 2018. The study, which used fetal tissue to create mice with humanlike immune systems, was examining whether an antibody might prevent HIV from establishing reservoirs in the human body.*Correction, 6 June, 11 a.m.: The amounts of NIH intramural and extramural spending in 2018 on projects involving fetal tissue have been corrected. (The total NIH spending of $115 million in 2018 remains the same.) Trump administration restricts fetal tissue researchcenter_img Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. 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Omarosa Sues Trump For Pay Discrimination

first_img Jesse Jackson Demands ‘Justice Now’ At EJ Bradford’s Moving Funeral Ceremony Looks like the checks are drying up for Omarosa Manigault Newman. After 15 years of working for Donald Trump, defending his racism and telling America to “bow down,” the scorned former White House staffer has now claimed she wasn’t paid fairly. She has reportedly filed to join the lawsuit of Alva Johnson, a Black former aide for the 2016 Trump election campaign who has also accused the president of sexual harassment and underpaying women during her time working for him. SEE ALSO: Some No Name, Pitchy R&B Singer Disrespected Keith Sweat And Gets Demolished On Twitter Vox reported that Omarosa filed documents on Monday to join Johnson’s lawsuit. She has alleged pay discrimination on the basis of gender. “After nearly 20 years inside the Beltway, working for two White Houses and countless political campaigns, I’ve never witnessed such egregious violations as I did during my time under the leadership of Donald Trump and Mike Pence,” her court documents said.As for Johnson’s lawsuit, she claimed Trump kissed her without consent and paid her unfairly, as well. Back in February, Johnson said on MSNBC that she “felt reduced to just another object” of Trump’s “unwanted sexual attention” and advances.“I was just kinda frozen. I didn’t know how to process it,” she explained to Chris Hayes at the time. “I knew it was inappropriate because I worked in human resources. So I knew that it was completely inappropriate,” Johnson continued. “It was gross and creepy. Like I could sometimes still see those lips.”When asked why she didn’t come forward sooner, she claimed she was under a non-disclosure agreement.Trump’s team, of course, has denied all allegations.If you were wondering why Johnson even joined the campaign of a sexist, racist and accused sexual predator, her logic was that she “thought Trump’s business acumen would help poor Black residents in her home state. She said she was feeling disillusioned by President Barack Obama, for whom she voted in 2008 and 2012.” Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Braford Jr. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMore3Share to EmailEmailEmail Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family However, in May 2017, nearly a year after she claimed she was assaulted by Trump, Johnson had flattering words to say about him during a radio interview in Alabama.“He is more incredible in person than I think you would even think as you see him on TV… He’s just the nicest guy,” she said at the time. “He treats everyone as if they are a part of his family.”She allegedly was expecting to be given a job as “second-in-command” at the U.S. Embassy in Lisbon.Her lawyer explained this quote by saying she was locked into a nondisclosure agreement at the time and was “saying what she thought Trump and his supporters wanted.”Sounds like Omarosa and Alva Johnson might just be seriously deplorable opportunists who advocated for a racist and now want some bizarre reparations.No cookout for those two — ever.SEE ALSO:All The Ways Cops Are Still Trying To Cover Up Laquan McDonald’s ExecutionOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes More By NewsOne Staff Alva Johnson , Donald Trump , Omarosa Manigault-Newman , Sexual Harassment last_img read more

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Tourists may be making Antarcticas penguins sick

first_img Mint Images/Aurora Photos Tourists may be making Antarctica’s penguins sick Microbiologist Marta Cerdà-Cuéllar at the Research Center for Animal Health in Barcelona, Spain, was skeptical of a mainstream scientific idea—that reverse zoonosis doesn’t exist in Antarctica. So she and colleagues collected fecal samples from 666 adult birds from 24 different species throughout the Southern Ocean, including rockhopper penguins, Atlantic yellow-nosed albatrosses, giant petrels, and skuas. Fearing that already deposited waste might be contaminated, the scientists scooped their poop from the birds themselves, a tricky business that meant catching them and cleaning them out with sterile swabs.“Penguins are very strong … and skuas are extremely clever,” says Jacob González-Solís, an environmental and evolutionary biologist from the University of Barcelona who was on the team. If you fail to catch a skua during your first approach, he says, it will never let you get close again.They collected their samples from 2008 to 2011 at four locations: Livingston Island, off the Antarctic Peninsula; and the Southern Ocean outposts of Marion Island, Gough Island, and the Falkland Islands, which are on many of the seabirds’ migration routes. Birds and humans in the more isolated islands are coming into increasing contact, thanks to research centers there and growing numbers of tourists.From the fecal samples, the scientists isolated and identified bacterial species and compared them to strains in humans and domestic animals. DNA from Campylobacter jejuni, which causes food poisoning, was a close match for such strains, suggesting humans may be passing their bacteria on to local seabirds, the researchers report online in Science of the Total Environment. The presence of certain strains of Salmonella and an antimicrobial-resistant type of another gastrointestinal bug, C. lari, which was found in all four locations, supports that conclusion, Cerdà-Cuéllar says.Elliott says it’s hard to predict which species will be impacted by the spread of these microbes. “We often think of polar environments as being too cold and that disease transmission is not a huge threat, but the authors have clear evidence that … bacteria can spread widely in polar environments.” González-Solís predicts that, even though Salmonella and Campylobacter don’t kill most infected wildlife, the pathogens could have “devastating” consequences to Antarctic bird colonies, because this is the first time most birds there have been exposed to these strains.So, say the paper’s authors, governments and scientific organizations need to do more to limit human impacts in Antarctica. For example, they should enforce existing rules about carrying home human waste—which can spread bacteria—says marine and polar ecologist Thomas Brey of the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany, who is the German representative to the Scientific Committee of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources.Elliott is pessimistic. “One reason that Antarctica remains largely protected is because of lobbying from tourist and scientific groups,” he says. “While we should do as much as possible to reduce transmission, it’s hard to believe that we will stop tourism and science at these sites, and so it is hard to believe that humans won’t continue to transmit pathogens.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Maria BolevichDec. 13, 2018 , 1:25 PM You can give your cat the flu. You can also pass pneumonia to a chimpanzee or tuberculosis to a bird. This kind of human-to-animal disease transmission, known as reverse zoonosis, has been seen on every continent except one: Antarctica. Now, human-linked pathogens in bird poop reveal, for the first time, that even animals on this isolated, ice-bound landmass can pick up a bug from tourists or visiting scientists. This newly identified infection route could have devastating consequences for Antarctic bird colonies, including population collapse and even extinction.“[We’re] obsessed about the potential for novel diseases to jump from wildlife to humans and cause an epidemic,” says ornithologist and ecologist Kyle Elliott at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, who was not involved in the new study. “In reality, the transmission of novel diseases from humans to wildlife has been far more disastrous.”The list of diseases that animals pass on to humans is long: anthrax, Ebola, tuberculosis, and Zika, to name just a few. By contrast, diseases known to move exclusively from humans to animals is much shorter, including human strains of influenza and mumps. Some pathogens—like Salmonella and Campylobacter—bounce from animal to human and back again. But some strains are specific to people, and simple blood tests can determine whether a pathogen started out in an animal or a human host.center_img Email Tourists and scientists are coming into increasing contact with Antarctic birds, which may be picking up pathogens from humans. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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An Amazing Story How a Sub Sailed the Pacific with Sails Made

first_imgIn spring 1921, USS Conestoga, a tugboat assigned to the United States Submarine Force, went missing somewhere in the Pacific, while on its way to American Samoa. The tugboat steamed out from Mare Island, California, together with a coal-transporting barge on March 25th. It was to stop at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for refueling, but something happened along the way. As it became clear that the had ship broken contact and that it must have encountered a problem during its voyage, a search party was dispatched from the Pearl Harbor military base in early May. Experts have estimated that Conestoga must have been somewhere around 100 nautical miles southeast of the coast of Hawaii.A submarine designated USS R-14 (SS-91) under the command of Lieutenant Alexander Dean Douglas was sent out in order to conduct a surface search, in hopes of rescuing the tugboat and its crew.USS Conestoga in 1921However, during what looked like a standard search and rescue mission, they were met by a strange twist of fate. The crew of the submarine very soon found encountered a situation where they were the ones in need of saving.Having incorrectly estimated the amount of fuel needed for the mission, when they arrived at the spot where Conestoga was presumed to be, the submarine had run out of usable fuel.Since its electric motors lacked enough battery power to transport them back to base, they were stranded some 100 nautical miles from Hawaii, caught in a desperate situation. To make matters worse, their radio had malfunctioned and all communication went silent. On top of it all, the limited food supply wasn’t going to hold out for more than five days.Navy Submarine USS R 14, SS 91, in Quincy, 1919. (Photo by Arkivi/Getty Images)They were out in the open sea, with no fuel and no means of letting their headquarters know in what trouble they were in or where were they stranded. The crew consisting of 27 men and two officers were getting restless, as their situation seemed unresolvable.That was until the submarine’s engineering officer Roy Trent Gallemore decided to think outside the box. Gallemore realized that they were, in fact, surrounded by a power source used by mariners for thousands of years.The ship’s engineer came up with an idea to use the wind to power the submarine.Seen here are the jury-rigged sails used to bring R-14 back to port in 1921; the mainsail rigged from the radio mast is the top sail in the photograph, and the mizzen made of eight blankets also is visible. R-14’s acting commanding officer, Lieutenant Alexander Dean Douglas, USN, is at top left, without a hat.All hands were soon employed in making a foresail out of the crew’s hammocks. Eight hammocks were stitched together, forming a sail, held by a frame made from dismantled bunks. The entire structure was then tied to the vertical kingpost of the torpedo loading crane, located forward of the submarine’s superstructure.However, a submarine was much heavier and had a much lower silhouette than let’s say a 16th-century Spanish galleon. With the foresail, it achieved a speed of no more than one knot (1.2 mph; 1.9 km/h).7 Greatest Shipwreck Treasure Ever DiscoveredSo Lieutenant Gallemore decided to produce additional sails in order to gain speed. His do-it-yourself approach certainly motivated the sailors who were just several hours earlier contemplating their impending doom.They built a mainsail out of six blankets and attached it to the radio mast, which added another half a knot to the total speed of the ship. In addition to this, another half a knot was achieved by stitching up another eight blankets and assembling yet another frame out of bunk beds.Conestoga’s crew in 1921.The third sail was then added to the vertically placed boom of the torpedo loading crane.Traveling at a speed of almost three knots, Gallemore was able to start recharging the batteries of the electric motors. After 69 hours of sailing, they finally reached the easternmost tip of the Hawaii islands and entered Hilo Harbor on the morning of May 15, 1921.Stern view of the Conestoga shipwreck colonized with sea anemones.For the achievement and spirit of innovation, Lieutenant Douglas received a letter of commendation from his Submarine Division Commander, CDR Chester W. Nimitz.USS Conestoga, on the other hand, wasn’t so lucky.Read another story from us: Cold War Double Agent? The Case of the Famous U-2 Spy Plane Shot Down in the USSRThe tugboat was officially declared missing on June 30, 1921, but it was not until 2009 that a shipwreck was discovered a few miles from Farallon Island, just off the coast of California.In 2016, the location of the shipwreck was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.Nikola Budanovic is a freelance journalist who has worked for various media outlets such as Vice, War History Online, The Vintage News, and Taste of Cinema. His main areas of interest are history, particularly military history, literature and film.last_img read more

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Mainpuri couple nightmare 2 held police say gang wanted for rape robberies

first_img Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Uttar Pradesh: Nine people shot, 4 injured over land dispute in Sonbhadra district More Explained Advertising Advertising 6 Comment(s) UP police, dalit, dalit beaten, dalit atrocities, up highway gangrape, mainpuri gangrape, uttar pradesh dalit man, mainpuri, aligarh-kanpur highway, up dalit man custody, up dalit man torture, dalit man beaten by police, up police beats dalit man, dalit woman rape, aligarh kanpur highway, dalit woman raped aligarh kanpur highway, yogi adityanath, india news, indian express Mainpuri police announce the arrests. (Express photo)FOUR days after a Dalit couple were attacked in Mainpuri, the wife abducted, and the husband allegedly tortured by police when he went to file a complaint, police on Tuesday made its first arrests, confirming that the men may have been part of earlier kidnapping and rape incidents on the same highway. Written by Manish Sahu | Lucknow | Updated: July 10, 2019 7:37:08 am Taking stock of monsoon rain Advertising Police had doubted the husband’s claims, accusing him of foul play, and said an initial medical report had ruled out rape. Three officers of Bichhawan Police Station, suspended after report of the incident came out and charged with attempt to murder, are absconding.Two of the arrested men have been identified as Anil Kumar alias Amit (36) and Shilendra Yadav (29), both residents of Etah, and are said to have confessed to abducting and raping the woman. Police are looking for a third accused, Lalu alias Satendra, a native of Mainpuri district, and said the men were wanted in seven cases, including attempt to murder, rape and robbery.READ | ‘Abduction, gangrape’ on Mainpuri Highway: Attempt to murder case against SO, 3 constables Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Related News Belonging to Bulandshahr district, the couple are staying for now at a relative’s home in Mainpuri district. The husband works in a factory, while the wife, 38, is employed in a private firm. They have been married 12 years.As they neared Naveen Mandi in Kurawali area of Mainpuri around 11.30 pm, three youths in a car blocked their motorcycle, the husband said. “They got out and dragged my wife at gunpoint into their vehicle. As I tried to stop them, they smashed my motorcycle and hit me. After they left, I dragged my motorcycle for about half an hour to reach Bichhwan area of Mainpuri where I made a call to the police control room from the cellphone of a taxi driver, informing them that my wife had been kidnapped. I was asked to wait there.”He added, “After a few minutes, a team from Bichhwan Police Station arrived in two vehicles. When I informed them in detail what had happened, they started suspecting and questioning me, instead of searching for my wife. I was forced to repeat the sequence several times. Suddenly, the policemen started beating me with sticks, right there on the road, claiming I was fabricating the kidnapping story. They said I had killed my wife and concealed her body. They told me to reveal the place where my wife’s body was dumped… I kept requesting them to search for my wife but they did not listen.”Later, the husband said, “Another team arrived and took me to the Kurawali Police Station. Since the incient had occurred in the Kurawali area, the Bichhwan police had informed them too.”He said he reached the Kurawali Police Station around 2 am, when he made a call to his family members. “At around 4 am, my wife too reached there and said the kidnappers had gangraped and dumped her in adjoining Etah district after taking her jewellery and Rs 15,000. She told me she took a bus to Etah and called up our family, who asked her to reach the Kurawali Police Station.”He said the police torture had left him with severe pain in two fingers of his right hand. “On Tuesday, police took me to a hospital for X-ray.” Best Of Express Officials claim to have recovered two countrymade pistols, two live cartridges, a car allegedly used in abducting the woman, as well as the woman’s possessions, including her purse containing her husband’s Aadhaar card, the registration papers of the motorcycle in which the couple were travelling and Rs 5,000, from Kumar and Yadav.A second medical examination of the woman by a panel of doctors, ordered by the District Magistrate, Mainpuri, could not be carried out on Monday as the hospital where it was to be conducted was busy with victims of the bus accident on the Yamuna Expressway.Superintendent of Police (Mainpuri) Ajai Shankar Rai said her examination would now be done on July 11.SP, Etah, Swapnil Mamgain said they were tipped off that criminals involved in some highway robberies were hiding in an under-construction house near Suna village in Etah. While Kumar and Yadav were arrested after a brief encounter, police said, Lalu managed to escape. “They confessed to involvement in three recent highway incidents, including the Mainpuri one. The other two incidents involve the kidnapping and rape of a woman in Kasganj on July 4 and robbery of Rs 35,000 from a man in Etah on May 10,” said the SP. Station House Officer of Kurawali Police Station Shiv Singh Chauhan said they were trying to find the absconding policemen, Bichhwan Police Station Officer Rajesh Pal Singh, constables Krishnaveer and Chhatrapati, and one unidentified constable.They are facing charges of attempt to murder and voluntarily causing hurt, and under the SC/ST (Prevention of Atrocities) Act. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Akhilesh Yadav forms 21-member panel to probe ‘fake cases’ lodged against Azam Khan READ | Assaulted, wife ‘abducted, raped’, Dalit says went to UP Police, was torturedMamgain added that the accused had been jointly interrogated by Etah, Kasganj and Mainpuri police. “The details they gave about the crimes matched the sequence of events provided by the victims. The modus operandi of the gang was to target couples on the highway. They would rob and rape the woman.”Police are looking for two other men said be their associates, Mukesh Yadav and Ram Avtar of Etah.Speaking to The Indian Express, the husband of the victim said Friday was the first time they had ventured out on the highway (Aligarh-Kanpur) at night. “I was going to Mainpuri for the last rites of my elder sister, who had died after a prolonged illness,” said the 41-year-old. UP: 2 kids die, 52 ill after drinking ‘contaminated’ water from school pump, says official last_img read more

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Issue of call drops in urban areas largely resolved Union minister Sanjay

first_img BJP to field 7 of its 9 MPs in Maharashtra Advertising Maharashtra BJP worker’s killing: Congress leader gets anticipatory bail Akola Court acquits 3 of terror charges: Mere use of word jehad can’t be ground to brand a person terrorist He was speaking during a meeting of telecom companies in Akola city held in the district head office of the BSNL.“The problem of call drops in urban areas, especially in metro cities, has been largely resolved. But the issue could still be faced in some remote areas,” the Minister of State for Communications, Electronics & Information Technologysaid.He advised the companies to set up more towers to improve their quality of service and to provide a better network to customers.“The companies need to lay the cables deep underground so that they are not damaged easily and the network remains uninterrupted,” Dhotre said.He added that the government would try to address the problems faced by the telecom companies. By PTI |Akola | Published: July 13, 2019 6:08:48 pm Sanjay Dhotre, call drop issue, call drops in Maharashtra, telecom news, Indian Express news “The problem of call drops in urban areas, especially in metro cities, has been largely resolved…,”Sanjay Dhotre said. (Representational Image)Union minister Sanjay Dhotre Saturday said the issue of call drops faced by mobile subscribers has been largely resolved in urban areas. Related News Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Fourlane highway for Kartarpur Sahib to be ready by Sept 30 Government

first_imgBy PTI |New Delhi | Updated: July 14, 2019 5:22:41 pm Pakistan increases land allotted to Kartarpur Gurdwara from 3 to 42 acres India, Pakistan move closer on Kartarpur corridor, pro-Khalistan leader dropped from panel Related News During the talks, the Pakistani authorities were also apprised of the fact that India was building the bridge on the Ravi Creek on the Indian side of international border and requested Pakistan to construct a bridge on Budhi Ravi Channel on their side, the statement said.But the Pakistani side initially proposed road on embankment and later on the proposed causeway.Both these options are not acceptable to India as there will be danger to the habitations on the Indian side in case of flood while the road too will not be an all-weather one, it said. Advertising Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield The construction work on the highway to the international border is progressing in full swing and half of the work of the entire project is already complete, the statement added.The 4.19 km-long highway is being built at a cost of Rs 120 crore.The government of India had approved the development of the Karatarpur Sahib corridor project on November 22 last year. The foundation stone for the project was laid by Vice President of India M Venkaiah Naidu on November 26, the statement said.The land acquisition process for the project was initiated on January 14 this year and concluded on May 21.The construction of bridge substructure, including its piling and pile caps has been completed on the Indian side, the statement said, adding the works of casting piers and piers caps is under progress along with the girder casting work.So far three technical level talks have been held with the Pakistani technical team to discuss issues related to this project such as zero point coordinates, finished road level, width of bridge at zero point.center_img Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Kartarpur corridor, kartarpur sahib, kartarpur, highway, highway for kartarpur sahib, india pak relations, pakistan, indian express The government of India had approved the development of the Karatarpur Sahib corridor project on November 22 last year. (File Photo)A four-lane highway linking Gurdaspur-Amritsar road to the international border for pilgrims to Kartarpur Sahib gurudwara in Pakistan will be ready by September-end, an official release said Sunday. Post Comment(s) Best Of Express Kartarpur Corridor: 54 immigration kiosks, seating for 2,000 part of passenger complex plan last_img read more

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