ROTC works to ‘serve others’ with blood drive

first_img “A central idea of the military is looking to serve others at all times,” senior Army ROTC cadet Kyle Hanratty said. “This event is a great way for us to accomplish that goal.” The blood drive takes place from noon to 6 p.m. both days in the LaFortune Ballroom. The drive will be run by the service clubs of the Army, Navy and Air Force branches: the Alliance to Lead and Serve (ATLAS) Club, the Trident Naval Society and the Arnold Air Society.  Hanratty also said ATLAS is looking to have a group of students travel with non-ROTC Notre Dame students to Honduras during fall break to work in orphanages there.  Hanratty said the blood drive is open to all students, staff and faculty, not just ROTC students, and that campus-wide participation is necessary for the three service clubs to surpass last year’s total of 235 pints of blood donated. In order to address this “vital need” for blood as fully as possible, all the blood donated at the event will be given to the American Red Cross. In addition, snacks and drinks will be provided to all donors. The semi-annual blood drive is one of several service events sponsored by the three ROTC service clubs, including the Trident Naval Society’s 24-hour run around campus and ATLAS’s volunteer program at the Robinson Community Learning Center. center_img “Being in the military gives you a whole different perspective on the vital need for blood as a means of saving lives,” Hanratty said. “But that need is a common one that isn’t just limited to the military.” In keeping with the spirit of service at Notre Dame, the University’s three Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) branches are sponsoring their semi-annual blood drive today and Thursday. But Hanratty said achieving the blood donation goal is not simply a matter of beating last year’s total; rather, the more blood donated, the more people will benefit from the generosity of the Notre Dame community. “This blood drive and the other ROTC service projects really represent the military’s commitment to service,” Hanratty said. “But we need the help of all students to accomplish our service goals.”last_img read more

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Lecture explores Catholic intellectual tradition

first_imgDespite major Church setbacks in recent years, Catholic intellectual tradition is still alive and well in the contemporary world, Margaret O’Brien Steinfels, former co-director of the Center on Religion and Culture at Fordham University said. She discussed this tradition, which she defined as the interplay of human intellect and spirituality through history, in a lecture titled “Perspectives on the Catholic Intellectual Tradition” Saint Mary’s College’s spring lecture series, “Mind, Body, Spirit: Connected,” Tuesday night. Steinfels said the fallout of the major sex abuse allegations in the early 2000s was a significant problem for the Church. “The scandal reported in January of 2002 about the Boston Catholic Church covering up sexual abuse by Church leaders was a pivotal moment for our Church,” Steinfels said. “This crisis affected every part of the Catholic community. The robust confidence in our Church as a whole has fallen several notches because of this.” Steinfels said this crisis and other issues created ambiguity about the strength of Church authority, the intellectual tradition and its interplay with social justice. “This tradition is both decisive and expansive,” Steinfels said. “Catholics have gone from [the tradition] being a structured phenomenon to something that can no longer be pinned down decisively. However, Catholics do have a rich selection of people to cite when we think about Catholic intellectual tradition and social justice. This selection spans decades and continents. “ In order to engage the Catholic intellectual tradition, Steinfels said Catholics must look to future progress. “Catholics needs to scan the horizon and argue the world,” Steinfels said. “We need to place emphasis on the notion that Catholic intellectual tradition looks not only to the past, but to the present and the future.” In order to actively participate in this tradition, Steinfels said Church members must seize the label “intellectual” as a badge of honor. “Intellectuals are often found in public forums. They are agonistic,” Steinfels said. “Intellectuals argue on different sides of large and important subjects.” She said intellectuals are the ones who pass down and reinvent tradition, and that this intellectual tradition will play into how future generations relate to the Catholic faith. “Tradition defined as something that is passed down implies that we always thought or acted in such a way, “Steinfels said. “If we really do what tradition asks we must acknowledge that each generation asks different questions and faces different challenges. Tradition may be a given that we hold near, but it is also invented.” Steinfels said Catholic intellectual tradition is especially important in today’s world, with its strong emphasis on empirical evidence. “There is more to the world we see through microscopes and telescopes,” Steinfels said. “Our Church’s tradition allows us to contest ideas and worldviews. This tradition allows us to create conversation that works to criticize and understand what we see around us.” “Empirical findings enrich the understanding of a human person, but they are not the end-all, be-all. Aspects of the human person cannot be explained scientifically,” she said. “If the scientific context of truth is not questioned then we will forever be living in a society where human life and human action are reduced.” Steinfels stressed the importance of the Church sharing this tradition with the public. “Some people wish for religion to be confined to private life. I believe it is a loss to the whole society when any religion is confined to the private life,” Steinfels said. “Catholics have a tradition that takes philosophy and philosophical thought seriously. These thoughts should be open for public discussion and do have an influence on policies and other matters of public life.”last_img read more

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Pen-pal program flourishes

first_imgStudents craving handwritten correspondence in the age of digital communication can join the Literacy Awareness Club of Notre Dame (LAND) and exchange personal letters with middle-school children in South Bend. Senior Emily Yates, president of LAND, said the program began in 2011 to reach out to children in the community. “Our goal is to help improve the rate of literacy in South Bend and in the United States by spreading awareness about low literacy rates,” Yates said. “We focus on programs for children, since they impact future literacy rates.” Yates said the pen-pal program currently pairs about 40 Notre Dame students with pen pals from the sixth grade class of Brown Intermediate Center. “As this is one of our most popular programs, we hope to expand it to more children here in South Bend, and perhaps even neighboring communities,” Yates said. Notre Dame students write pen-pal letters every other week, which gives the middle-school students a week to respond, Yates said. “Many letters include pictures, drawings, stickers and even small gifts,” Yates said. “We have a location in LaFortune where LAND members drop off the letters, and our club delivers them to a contact with the school.” Yates said the pen-pal program is just one of the four main volunteering activities LAND sponsors. Members also volunteer at the Robinson Community Learning Center, the Boys and Girls Club, the St. Joseph County Public Library and the Hesburgh Library. “As president of LAND, I get in contact with local libraries and places that work with children and coordinate ways for people in LAND to volunteer,” Yates said. “Members of LAND sign up for whatever events they can attend as they become available.” The largest volunteering opportunities are the Open Book Festival in the fall and One Book, One Michiana in the spring, Yates said. The Hesburgh Library and the St. Joseph’s County Library host these events together. “I hope to get plenty of volunteers to sign up for our events with One Book, One Michiana that will be happening in April,” Yates said. “I also hope to begin to organize the election process for choosing a new cabinet for next year and to continue to expand the club to get even more people to sign up for events.” Yates said the club hopes to offer more volunteering opportunities to better serve the community. “We can try to make a difference in St. Joseph County by promoting literacy awareness and working with children to change the future of our local community,” she said.last_img read more

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ND alum founds new bus company

first_imgChristopher Cali, a 2014 alum and current graduate student of Notre Dame, recently started a company called Better Cheaper Bus LLC, which offers affordable transportation for Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students to both the O’Hare and Midway airports in Chicago.“Final steps with the University are being taken to have the buses use McKenna Hall as a departure point,” Cali said.Better Cheaper Bus identifies as a third party transportation provider with the central goal of making transportation more efficient as well as more affordable to students. Cali said the idea came to him when one of his friends experienced frustration with the transportation to Midwestern airports.“My friend, Rory Dunne, took a trip back home to Ireland, and [when he] came back here, [he] had a 5-hour layover using the current transportation service,” Cali said.Cali said it was his friend’s personal inconvenience that helped him to conceive the idea of Better Cheaper Bus. Dunne gave him the inspiration to start forming this small company within a short time frame.“It was the week before Thanksgiving … that we started talking about it,” Cali said. “Through interviews with students, we got a lot of good feedback to make it more efficient.”Cali said aside from benefitting students, Better Cheaper Bus also benefits the South Bend community by donating 20 percent of its profits to the South Bend Center for the Homeless.“When we were thinking about the business, we realized it typically fell around certain holidays,” Cali said. “We figured that we talk a lot about social responsibility, and the Center came up in our minds really quickly.”This donation is the reason behind the business’ slogan, “Ride With a Cause.” The money donated to the South Bend Center for the Homeless will help to finance the holiday dinners during the Christmas season.“Starting a business isn’t easy, and we’re learning a ton,” Cali said. “We circumvented difficulties by getting the word out early, talking to students and creating a “Request Time” button on our website.”Cali said the input of students is crucial to the entire entrepreneurial process and led to the “Request Time” button and student interviews. Through student feedback, Better Cheaper Bus could decide which times of year service would assist students the most.“We’re thinking of running it during Christmas … spring break and at the end of spring semester,” Cali said.Better Cheaper Bus aims to provide a more efficient option for transportation, and Cali also hopes to make the students’ experiences more comfortable and enjoyable.“We’re offering WiFi; we have phone chargers on board and hopefully a DVD player. All the while, you’re donating 20 percent of what you spend to charity,” Cali said. “It’s a simple way to give back without necessarily lifting a finger.”Tags: affordable transportation, better cheaper bus, better cheaper bus LLC, christopher cali, LLC, midway, oharelast_img read more

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Notre Dame student senators undergo diversity training

first_imgStudent senate convened Wednesday night for Diversity and Inclusion training with Rachel Wallace, the Diversity Council representative to the Student Union, and assistant Africana studies professor Maria McKenna.McKenna said diversity is especially important at Notre Dame. “Diversity gets thrown around a lot, and many think it just means race, but I want you guys to think about it more broadly,” McKenna said. “We want you guys to keep talking about this — we’re not just here to preach at you; we’re trying to start a conversation. Notre Dame has never been as diverse as it is in this moment.”Wallace said it was important to pay attention to implicit biases — subtle, unconscious judgments. “I feel like a lot of times people judge me unfairly, and sometimes, I judge people unfairly,” she said. “And it’s definitely a real thing that we deal with with implicit biases, and it’s very much an issue at Notre Dame.”Microaggressions have also become more important to pay attention to at Notre Dame, Wallace said. “Microaggressions are things that look harmless on the surface, but actually can be hurtful or based off an unfair assumption,” she said. In addition to listening to other’s perspectives, Wallace said it was important to validate other’s experiences. “[It’s saying], ‘you’re allowed to feel that way’ … and that really just goes a long way,” she said. “It’s ok to say the wrong thing, but when that happens, it’s important to recognize that as well.”McKenna said that, as student leaders, everyone in the student senate has a responsibility to make Notre Dame feel like home while not impeding difficult conversations. “When Ann Coulter was here a couple years ago, everyone was up in arms, including me, but not for a second did I want her uninvited, because we do want to keep this conversation going, even when it’s hard,” McKenna said. “We want you all to stand up and be able to say, you know, that’s not okay to say, and here’s why. Keep an open mind about where you have that conversation and how you keep that conversation going.”In addition to diversity training, student body president Corey Robinson opened the floor to questions about and critiques of the new SafeBouND program, formerly known as O’SNAP. “We’re getting back to the basics here,” Robinson said. “We’re trying to reduce the number of [SafeBouND] requests so the people that actually need to use the program can use the program.” Senate parliamentarian Monica Montgomery said that, according to a number of studies run last year, the former O’SNAP program was not used for the right reasons. “There would be people that would wait upwards of an hour to get a ride, which we think really is unfortunate because they really did need that ride,” Montgomery said. “The system really was overused and abused.”Tags: Diversity and Inclusion, diversity council, SafeBouND, student senatelast_img read more

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Handbell Choir to tour in China

first_imgFive years ago, Jonathan Noble, director of Notre Dame’s Beijing Global Gateway, heard the Notre Dame Handbell Choir perform before a group of senior Chinese education officials. With plans underway to open a new location, Noble decided the handbells would play at its dedication, Karen Schneider-Kirner, director of the Handbell Choir, said. This weekend, 14 members of the Handbell Choir will travel to Beijing to play for the long-anticipated dedication, followed by a week of concerts before Chinese audiences.“For the staff that works there, it’s a big deal to highlight why they’re there,” Schneider-Kirner said. “They want to introduce more Chinese students to Notre Dame, but also provide a space where American students can go and learn more about Chinese business practices or get involved in other universities over China.”The new center is located in Genesis Beijing, a state-of-the-art building offering filtered air and access to cultural events, lectures and an art museum. After the Gateway’s dedication ceremony, the choir will play several more concerts in Beijing before traveling to Chengdu.“The bells originated in China. It’s one of the oldest musical instruments we have, but Chinese people in general know nothing about what we know as a handbell choir today, with the smaller brass bells playing different tunes and intricate patterns,” Schneider-Kirner said. “It will be something very unique to the people we’ll be playing for.”In addition to the cultural connection, the bells offer a means of avoiding the censorship of China’s atheist government, Schneider-Kirner said.“With the bells, it doesn’t involve lyrics. As more of a sacred music group, I think we can translate better since China overall is a pretty atheistic country,” she added.The Handbell Choir will, however, be able to participate in Catholic services at South Cathedral in Beijing and Pinganqiao Cathedral in Chengdu.“This is a pretty groundbreaking trip because we’re also doing things within the Catholic Church,” Schneider-Kirner said. “About a year ago, a Fr. Matthew, the rector of South Cathedral in Beijing, came to meet with [University president] Fr. John [Jenkins] as a way to open up doors for collaboration. He’ll be saying a Mass with us and then we’ll be doing a concert at the Cathedral for a hundred seminarians.”The Handbell Choir will play several more concerts in and near Beijing over the next few days: three at an international school, one in collaboration with a Chinese instrument orchestra at Peking University and one on the Great Wall.“We’re just stuffing bells in our backpacks and bringing portable music stands,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Apparently it’s nothing we can ask permission for; we’re just going to do it and see what happens.”After a few days in Beijing, the choir will fly to Chengdu, where they will play two more concerts in collaboration with Szechuan University.“We’ll combine with different groups: There’s a Chinese instrument orchestra, a 25-member erhu orchestra, a 50-member choir and a symphony orchestra from the school,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Some of these pieces we’re doing together; in order to bridge the gap, I’ve arranged a bunch of traditional Chinese music pieces that I think will work well on the bells, just so we’re not bringing completely unfamiliar music.” About one third of the music the choir will play on the trip is traditional Chinese music, while the other two thirds are drawn from their usual repertoire, Schneider-Kirner said. The choir will finish their tour playing at a Mass and concert at Pinganqiao Cathedral in Chengdu and sharing a dinner with the parents of a former choir member. Schneider-Kirner explained that the purpose of the trip is to convey a message of welcome from Notre Dame to the students at the various universities they will perform at and to bridge the cultural gap.“We thought it would be a great opportunity … to do things within the Catholic church, which is pretty phenomenal. I don’t know if any other Notre Dame groups, particularly religiously affiliated, have ever done anything in China. It’s definitely groundbreaking in that way,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Primarily, it’s a great opportunity to promote peace and understanding and building bridges with our sisters and brothers in Asia.”Tags: China, fall break, Handbell Choirlast_img read more

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GoldLink to perform at SUB spring concert

first_imgThe Student Union Board (SUB) announced Tuesday that the artist GoldLink will perform at Friday’s spring concert with MadeinTYO! as the opening act. The SUB concert will return to the Stepan Center, after last semester’s concert featuring Quinn XCII was moved to Legend’s. The fall concert was relocated to accommodate for athletics, which was using the center at the time of the concert. Junior and lead programmer of concerts Bethany Boggess said the return to the Stepan Center will allow more students to attend the show.“The Fall Concert featuring Quinn XCII was held at Legends, which has a capacity of 629,” she said in an email. “The Spring Concert will be at Stepan Center, and there are 2,000 tickets available. We reached capacity at Legends pretty quickly in the fall, so the larger venue will allow us to accommodate more students.”According to the SUB website, GoldLink’s single “Crew” reached the 45th spot on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, and he was nominated for Best New Hip-Hop Artist at the iHeartRadio Music Awards. He will tour a number of sites, both domestically and internationally, including stops in Hungary, Spain, Croatia and Canada, amongst other places.MadeinTYO! is known for his music video, accompanying his song “Uber Everywhere,” which garnered more than 57 million views, according to the SUB website. He is from Atlanta, home to several other hip-hop artists.In bringing these artists to campus, and introducing more affordable tickets, SUB aimed to make the event more inclusive, Boggess said.“We were incredibly intentional in our selection of the artists for this year’s concert,” she said. “Last semester, a member of the student body prompted SUB Concerts to evaluate its track record of inclusivity and representation. Not only were we able to contract artists with diverse backgrounds and sounds, but we were able to offer tickets for only $5 to hopefully allow more students to attend.” Leading up to the announcement, SUB used a Spotify playlist to keep students guessing about which artist would perform at the show.“The best part of planning the concert was planning and maintaining the Spotify playlist as a means to announce the artists,” Boggess said. “We started with 30 artists on a Spotify playlist called ‘Who’s Coming to Stepan?’ and gradually removed artists until only GoldLink and [MadeinTYO!] remained. It definitely built up a lot of anticipation and kept students interested and talking about the concert before it was announced.”Boggess said she encourages all hip-hop fans to attend the event.“Tickets are on sale now in the LaFortune Box Office for only $5 until 11 p.m. on Thursday night,” she said. “On Friday, you can buy tickets at the door of the show for $10. If you like hip-hop at all, you should give these artists a shot — you won’t be disappointed.”Tags: GoldLink, MadeinTYO!, Stepan Center, SUB concert, SUB Spring Concertlast_img read more

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Senate hears presentation from Campus Dining, discusses porn filter

first_imgIn their last meeting of the fall semester, Notre Dame’s student senate heard a presentation from Campus Dining about new on-campus retail locations and discussed recent Observer articles regarding the porn filter.Senior director of Campus Dining Chris Abayasinghe and director of retail dining Luigi Alberganti led the presentation, where they announced the addition of two new retail dining locations on campus: Garbanzo Mediterranean Fresh in Hesburgh Center, and Pizza Pi — in place of Reckers — in South Dining Hall. Alberganti emphasized the influence of student well-being in their decisions. “My mission is to make sure that we bring the concepts that we think will have an impact on campus life,” Alberganti said. Alberganti said Garbanzo would replace the Au Bon Pain Catering currently located in Hesburgh Center. Garbanzo, a Mediterranean-influenced restaurant, will offer fresh foods for vegans, vegetarians and omnivores alike. “This can be a snack or it can be a full meal,” Alberganti said.Alberganti said Garbanzo Mediterranean Fresh is expected to open in February of 2019.He also discussed the opening of a new eatery to replace Reckers behind South Dining Hall. “We heard from students that the late-night places were something that we needed to improve on,” Alberganti said. Pizza Pi will offer a variety of menu items, including pizzas, baked pasta, salad, smoothies and desserts. In addition, the restaurant will have a bar serving local beer and wine options for students who are 21 and older. “Our intention is to provide a very responsible approach to serving wine and beer on this campus,” Alberganti said. However, Alberganti said though students will be able to use flex points to purchase food at Pizza Pi, they cannot use them to buy beer and wine. The timeline for the project is to have the establishment finished by May 2019, with periodic updates provided by student government and Campus Dining until the restaurant’s completion. After Campus Dining’s presentation, members of the senate engaged in a discussion about the porn filter controversy on Notre Dame’s campus, mainly in regards to the Letter to the Editor published in The Observer — “The men of Notre Dame request a porn filter” — in which members of the Notre Dame community advocated for blocking access to pornography websites. The original letter has led to various responses, both in agreement and opposition to the filter. Junior and Sorin College senator Mark Spretnjak brought up the issue, saying it was an issue being discussed throughout campus but had yet to be debated by the senate. “This is something that a lot of people around campus have been talking about and it hasn’t been brought up here, and a lot of people have asked me to bring it up at Senate just so we can talk about it,” he said.Senior and diversity council president Alyssa Ngo said the movement has been spearheaded by the group Students for Child-Oriented Policy, or SCOP. “The specifics of their proposal are they had the top 25 porn websites, whatever they are measured to be, and that’s what they want to ban,” Ngo said. “So your question, how do we ban porn, that’s how.”Senior and student body vice president Corey Gayheart said the Senate can and may look into the issue, but this is a common debate at Notre Dame.“It tends to happen each year at some point,” he said.  Tags: Campus DIning, garbanzo, ND student senate, pizza pi, porn filter, student senatelast_img read more

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Better Together ND aims to foster religious dialogue, community

first_imgWhile Notre Dame is a Catholic university, the students and community members that make up the Notre Dame community are not all of one faith or background. Better Together ND, a leadership program sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns (CSC), aims to foster conversations between people of different religious and humanistic beliefs through workshops and events. “It’s [a] leadership program that trains and prepares students for an environment containing people with multiple intersectionalities,” sophomore and student leader for Better Together ND Meenu Selvan said. “It’s a series of workshops that teaches students how to interact with other leaders from different backgrounds to unite in solidarity for a common cause and to organize.”Director of leadership formation for the CSC Melissa Marley Bonnichsen said the groups are made up of undergraduate and graduate students who meet up to discuss their different life experiences and how they have impacted their beliefs — religious or otherwise. “The groups are open to anyone who [welcomes] interfaith dialogue and collaboration including students who come from any religious experience or non-religious experiences and or who identify as atheist, agnostic or secular humanist,” Marley Bonnichsen said in an email.Senior and student leader Heather DiLallo said the only requirement is the willingness to have a conversation with people who may have vastly different beliefs than what one is used to.“All we ask is that every student has ears to hear what others have to say and respect for the dignity of each person, no matter how different they are from you,” DiLallo said in an email.  Photo courtesy of Melissa Marley Bi Members of Better Together ND gathered for a winter celebration dinner in November. The club has its first spring meeting Thursday.Selvan said she decided to become involved with Better Together ND because she currently serves as the director of faith and service for student government and wanted to improve her ability to work with people who have different beliefs. “I wanted to be equipped with the skills to collaborate with leaders who [represent] individuals with specific faith-based identities,” Selvan said in an email. “I wanted to transform Student Government’s space intended for faith to be more inclusive of interfaith work. Better Together ND has provided me [with] the skills, resources and platform to accomplish this.”Marley Bonnichsen said that amid a divisive political climate in the United States, it is important to focus on what brings us together. “We must be able to get to know people who are different from us, who may agree and disagree and have different lives in order to understand our shared and partnered future together,” she said. “It is in this place that I believe that we can then strive together for the common good regardless of our background or story, race, ethnicity, religion or political alignment … But mutual respect and understanding are necessary and critical first steps in the process if we are to go far together.”Senior and student leader for Better Together ND Isabel Weber said the initiative can help to demonstrate that there are lots of different ways to be religious — or even to simply care about the world at large.“Reaching out to different world view communities helps us create lasting solutions that foster unity rather than division,” Weber said in an email. “I also think Better Together will help people see that faith is not so homogenous here as people might think. Even within Catholicism, there is a wide diversity of faith practices, but that doesn’t mean we can’t work together to help others.”Weber said one of the reasons she decided to get involved with Better Together ND was because her parents are an interreligious couple and she grew up celebrating both the Catholic and Jewish faiths.“I know firsthand how much goodness and love can come from interfaith dialogue,” Weber said in an email. “My parents have so much more that unifies them than makes them different, and I firmly believe that holds true for all humans of all belief systems.”DiLallo said she is part of a minority faith tradition at Notre Dame and that during her time at the University she has learned extensively about Catholicism, but not much about other faiths or beliefs. This, she said, fuels her belief that Better Together ND is an important initiative at Notre Dame today. “This is a great way to start dialogue and help people who may have never deeply interacted with someone outside their own faith background to really learn and grow,” DiLallo said. Marley Bonnichsen said the ultimate objective of Better Together ND has been to facilitate conversations between people of different beliefs, faiths and backgrounds. “This goal highlights the importance of relationships and my hope is that the participants will remember this each time they engage in a larger conversation or debate about what’s happening in our world, that they’ll remember it when they vote, that they will remember it when there is conflict around them and when it seems so hard to understand the others’ point of view,” Bonnichsen said. Better Together ND will be hosting its spring launch meeting Thursday at 5:30 p.m. in the Geddes Hall Coffeehouse. Tags: better together ND, Catholicism, Center for Social Concerns, interreligious dialogue, religionlast_img read more

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Senate discusses future of COVID-19 response financial account

first_imgAt its weekly meeting Thursday, Notre Dame’s student senate focused on questions related to an account created last year which set aside approximately $200,000 of unused Student Union funds when the spring semester was cut short due to COVID-19.Senate order 2021-02, which created the COVID-19 Response Financial Account, stated that when student activities returned this semester, the senate would decide exactly how the money should be used.Senior Grace Stephenson, chairwoman of the Financial Management Board (FMB), joined the senate to give a presentation on the account and deliver the FMB’s advice on how to handle the unusual fund.“The intent with passing this order was to say we don’t know what’s going to happen in the future … We’re going to set [the money] aside so we can be intentional,” she said.The FMB suggested the senate move to set aside $10,000 of the COVID-19 Response Financial Account to be used for allocation to organizations for the remaining three months of the allocation period. In this plan, the remaining money would be withheld until the winter reallocation process. This would allow the FMB to gather more information on the 2021-2022 fiscal year and better evaluate future needs.Stephenson said the FMB still has some hesitations about the language of the order. Key among these concerns is that sales for The Shirt are down this year which will decrease future funding.The motion to go forward with the FMB’s plan will be voted on at next week’s senate meeting on Sept. 10.Outside of the COVID-19 Response Financial Account, the senate briefly discussed a few other pertinent topics.Senior and student body vice president Sarah Galbenski commended the student advocacy by the Notre Dame Strike for Black Lives.“Born out of this movement we’re going to have a racial justice working group, this Saturday, Sept. 5 from 4-5 p.m.,” she said.Following this announcement, senior and chief of staff Aaron Benavides gave an update on campus dining.“Campus Dining is really at the mercy of the state of Indiana right now in dealing with all the health and safety guidelines that the state is putting out,” he said.Galbenski also detailed the actions of the faculty senate recently, specifically referring to two movements. The first presented was a motion to aid in student mental health through professor flexibility, and the second was to create a partnership between the group of Black student leaders working with the Division of Student Affairs and a task force related to academic affairs and curriculum.Senior and student body president Rachel Ingal discussed the off-campus town hall Wednesday. She also provided an update on her and Galbenski’s presidential initiative, the inaugural Women’s Leadership Forum.“The vision is that this will be a monthly series, and the student body will be able to tune in and listen to different diverse sets of speakers,” Ingal said.After these announcements, Galbenski led the oath of office for four newly elected members, sophomores Albertina Estrada Martinez and Theresa Salazar, junior Bianca Burnett and senior Blake Johnson. By taking the oath, they became official senators. These new senators will join the current senators in next week’s vote on the COVID-19 Response Financial Account and FMB proposal.Tags: COVID-19 Response Financial Account, Senatelast_img read more

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