ARISE Proves In Its 5th Year That It Is Much More Than A Music Festival

first_imgLoad remaining images This past weekend, the ARISE Music Festival celebrated its 5th year in Loveland, CO, at the gorgeous Sunrise Ranch. While looking around at some of the most beautiful views and landscape you will ever see in a festival setting, surrounded by mountains on all sides, it becomes crystal clear why fans choose to return each year. With a lineup of heavy-hitters such as Lettuce, Atmosphere, Tipper, Brother Ali, Ani DiFranco, Beats Antique, Rising Appalachia, SunSquabi, Break Science, and so much more, it would prove difficult to not have a smile on your face the entire weekend.Boasting a complete sellout this time around, ARISE doesn’t just rely on its solidly diverse musical lineup, but strives to create a truly complete experience. ARISE offers attendees one-of-a-kind yoga classes, various workshops, panel discussions, art installations, live painters and galleries. The festival is also fully committed to its nature component, as they plant a tree for every ticket sold, use products that are environmentally friendly, and maintain a major pledge to the leave-no-trace ethos. Most festivals offer these things in one way or another, but as I walked around seeing large crowds actually committed to what some would call “supplemental activities,” it quickly dawned on me that quite a large percentage of attendees were here just for this reason. Just one example would be seeing the yoga tent absolutely packed at 9am; I’m not talking just 25-30 people, more like 200+ easy, and that lasted throughout the day, every day.As for the music, it’s hard to not give a nod to Lettuce, who proved once again why they are at the forefront of the evolution of funk music, while both Brother Ali and Atmosphere provided the inspired hip-hop vibe with plenty of bumping bass to go around. Colorado’s own SunSquabi, who played two sets over the weekend, threw down a late-night set “with Friends” such as Adam Deitch, Borahm Lee, Jesus Coomes, Nicholas Gerlach, and more, that provided straight filthy beats from start to finish with inspired jamming galore. The Expendables had a tight grip on the crowd during their set, while Ani DiFranco continued to give evidence of why she is one of the best folk singer-songwriters of her generation. Beats Antique, Rising Appalachia, Desert Dwellers, Dopapod, Jeff Austin, The Travelin’ McCoury’s, Maddy O’Neal, RDGLDGRN….it’s all right there, front and center for you the entire weekend. Non-stop fun in a majestic location, you can’t ask for anything else.ARISE has proven itself to not only be your average, run-of-the-mill music festival. It is a conscious gathering of people designed to make a difference in the world. While walking around the festival, there was barely any trash on the ground, which is no small feat for any festival; but, at ARISE, people were truly cognizant of where they were and what they were doing, creating an example that you can have plenty of fun without destroying everything around you. To actually witness this at a festival, 8,000+ people strong in attendance, with nothing but smiles on their face, is rather impressive, to say the very least.In a short five year span, ARISE has quickly become not only one of the premier festivals in Colorado (outside of Telluride Bluegrass Festival), but arguably the entire country. Festival organizers and staff run a tight ship, ensuring that everybody that is sharing in the groove is having a good time, safe while doing so, and has everything that they need on-site to ensure a positive experience, paying close attention to all the details.With this year’s festivities still fresh in our heads, organizers have already announced two of the initial headliners for next year, with both Slightly Stoopid and Thievery Corporation on tap for the 2018 edition of ARISE (set to take place August 3rd – 6th). A limited number of loyalty tickets are now available on the official event website for $139 at www.arisefestival.com. Check out some video (courtesy of The Chronic Electronic) and a full gallery of pictures below:Tipper w/ Android JonesCalvin Hobbeslast_img read more

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Eddie Vedder & Judd Apatow Hilariously Honor Garry Shandling At Bonnaroo 2016 [Pro-Shot]

first_imgToday, Billboard debuted a new video featuring Eddie Vedder and one of the most prolific comedic film producers of this century, Judd Apatow, onstage together at Bonnaroo 2016, which Pearl Jam headlined. The clip is part of a promo push for Apatow’s new two-part HBO documentary, The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling. The two-part project takes a deep dive into the life of his late mentor and comedy legend Garry Shandling with help from various famous friends and family members.During Judd’s scheduled “Judd Apatow & Friends” set at the festival’s Comedy Theater, Apatow explained, “I’m gonna bring out a friend and we’re gonna sing a song together in honor of my friend, Garry Shandling,” before Vedder strolled onstage to a chorus of cheers.As Eddie Vedder got set up with his music stand and acoustic guitar, Apatow explained, “Garry Shandling was my mentor. He gave me my first job. I wrote for the Grammys for Garry. And then I wrote for The Larry Sanders Show for Garry. … When he passed away we found these big stacks of diaries and journals, some of them very personal and some of them just filled with jokes. And when I was asked to do Bonnaroo, I said [to Eddie Vedder] ‘would you want to do this show?’ And Eddie said yes. And then the other day I said ‘what do you want to do?’ And he said ‘I was thinking about taking all of Garry Shandling’s writings and turning them into a song.’”Continues Apatow, “So then Eddie sent me a video of the song, and it was amazing. It’s a combination of his journals and jokes. And today I said ok let’s listen to the song, and he no you’re singing it with me…which is kind of not what anybody wants, not me or you [laughs]. But there is something nice about sharing our love for Garry…so I’m gonna sing this with Mr. Vedder.”The two go on to perform the song together, with Vedder handling the “very personal” writings, and Apatow peppering in the aforementioned stacks of jokes (like “My friends tell me I have an intimacy problem, but they don’t really know me” or “I shave one leg so it feels like I’m sleeping with a woman”). The result is a thoroughly enjoyable performance that’s at once hilarious and sincerely heartfelt by a couple masters in those respective specialties. You can watch the video below, courtesy of Billboard:Judd Apatow and Eddie Vedder In Concert – “Dear Mind” – From The Journals of Garry Shandling – Bonnaroo Comedy Theater – 6/11/16<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>[Video: Billboard]The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling is on HBO now.[H/T Billboard]last_img read more

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The Rolling Stones Add New Dates To “No Filter” U.S. Tour

first_imgToday, The Rolling Stones announced two additional U.S. tour dates following their initial 2019 “No Filter” U.S. stadium tour announcement last week.In addition to their initial 13 scheduled performances, The Rolling Stones have added a second show at East Rutherford, NJ’s MetLife Stadium on June 17th as well as a second show at Chicago, IL’s Soldier Field on June 25th. The band had previously announced a show in East Rutherford on June 13th and in Chicago on June 21st.A  fan pre-sale for the two newly added dates starts tomorrow, November 29th at 10 a.m. local time here. Tickets for the newly announced dates, as well as The Rolling Stones’ initial 13 U.S. tour dates, go on sale to the general public this Friday, November 30th at 10 a.m. local time.For more information on ticketing and The Rolling Stones’ upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website here.The Rolling Stones No Filter U.S. Tour:April 20th, 2019 – Miami Gardens, FL @ Hard Rock StadiumApril 24th – Jacksonville, FL @ TIAA Bank FieldApril 28th – Houston, [email protected] NRG StadiumMay 7th – Glendale, AZ @ State Farm StadiumMay 11th – Pasadena, CA @ The Rose BowlMay 18th – Santa Clara, CA @ Levi’s StadiumMay 22nd – Seattle, WA @ CenturyLink FieldMay 26th – Denver, CO @ Broncos Stadium at Mile HighMay 31st – Washington, D.C. @ FedExFieldJune 4th – Philadelphia, PA @ Lincoln Financial FieldJune 8th – Foxborough, MA @ Gillette StadiumJune 13th – East Rutherford, NJ @ MetLife StadiumJune 17th – East Rutherford, NJ @ MetLife StadiumJune 21st – Chicago, IL @ Soldier FieldJune 25th – Chicago, IL @ Soldier FieldView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Phil Lesh Announces 79th Birthday Shows At The Capitol Theatre

first_imgToday, Phil Lesh has announced his 5th-annual birthday bash at his east coast home-away-from-home, The Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY. The three-night celebration is set to take place on March 14th, 15th, and 16h, 2019.Phil’s band lineups for the birthday shows, billed as Phil Lesh & Friends, have yet to be announced. However, an announcement from The Cap notes that Phil will be playing with “a fresh lineup of old friends and first-time collaborators.”Related: Celebrate Phil Lesh’s 78th Birthday With These Standout Performances From The Capitol TheatrePhil has played plenty of memorable shows at The Cap over the years—first as a member of the Grateful Dead and later with various Phil & Friends lineups since the venue was reopened in 2012. He was even presented with a key to the city of Port Chester in 2017. We can’t wait to get back to The Capitol Theatre with Phil in March and continue the tradition!For ticketing information, head here.last_img read more

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Anderson .Paak Shows His Softer, Soulful Side On New Smokey Robinson-Assisted Track, “Make It Better” [Video]

first_imgOn Thursday, Anderson .Paak premiered a brand new song featuring Motown legend Smokey Robinson, “Make It Better”. The new track will appear on .Paak’s forthcoming new record, Ventura, his second LP in the space of less than a year following the October 2018 release of his acclaimed album, Oxnard. Ventura is set to arrive on April 12th.The new track is a sonic departure from most of .Paak’s previous material. While it starts with a sparse, hip-hop-style kick/snare beat, “Make It Better” quickly shifts gears toward the R&B side of the spectrum, showing fans a softer side to the rapper/drummer/bandleader.As .Paak noted about the new track while filling in for Zane Lowe on Beats 1 for the song’s debut, “I think it’s one of my first straight-ahead love songs. I don’t think I’m cursing on it at all, you know what I’m sayin’? I played this for my moms, she immediately started dancing in her muumuu…ha HA!” Hear Anderson .Paak talk about the new track on Beats 1 below: The softer, more soulful sound falls in step with .Paak’s forecasts for his next chapter. In a recent appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, he said that fans could expect “Lots of soul, a bigger tour, and the best teeth in the game.” .Paak also made good on the bigger tour/best teeth in the came portion of his forecast in late February with the announcement of his Best Teef In The Game tour, a run of shows at arenas and amphitheaters nationwide. Thundercat will serve as support throughout the entirety of the tour, with Mac DeMarco, Earl Sweatshirt, Noname, and Jessie Reyez joining in on select dates.Related: THERE WILL BE NO SIMPIN’: Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals Kick Off ‘Andy’s Beach Club’ World Tour in San FranciscoCheck out the official music video for Anderson .Paak’s “Make It Better” featuring Smokey Robinson below:Anderson .Paak ft. Smokey Robinson – “Make It Better”[Video: Anderson Paak]For more information on Ventura, the Best Teef In The Game tour, and more, head to Anderson .Paak’s website.last_img read more

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Food for thought, and testing

first_imgFar from the beaten path of Harvard Square, with its austere libraries and scurrying students, Valerie Nelson is freezing food.Not just any food, but some of the University’s food, which is kept for an undisclosed amount of time in an unidentified location, all in the interest of safety and public health.Nelson is a safety ninja. You might’ve seen her, though most likely not. She’s one of a group of clandestine food inspectors who show up unannounced at some of Harvard’s most publicized events, including Commencement. She was there, sampling the catering trays while using individually wrapped tongue depressors — “Much to the dismay of people serving wonderful things like filet mignon,” she revealed — and was in and out before anyone could stop short, exiting into a haze of fog.“Ninety percent of what I do is under the radar,” said Nelson, whose office is on the outskirts of campus. “It’s a part of the protection of the health and safety of the community that people are not aware of, but it’s happening behind the scenes all the time.”Food samples are refrigerated for three days (most food-borne illnesses emerge during that time, Nelson said) before being frozen, or “archived” for later testing should a need arise.A registered sanitarian, Nelson is public health manager for Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) at the University. She has a litany of responsibilities, but mostly oversees food safety. She’s on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Her program consists solely of her and one part-time staffer.“We’re a one-and-a-half-person team,” she said, though she regularly enlists the help of EHS colleagues who are industrial hygienists, chemists, and biologists.Her team conducts unannounced food safety audits, and her coverage includes the campus’s residential and retail dining spots, Crimson Catering, the Harvard Faculty Club, FAS student grills, and the Dudley House Co-op. “We provide feedback and training based on the results of those audits,” she said.The inspections are less scary than they might seem. Nelson ensures that food is correctly prepared, stored, and served. She works with outside caterers, makes sure they are properly credentialed, and monitors food recalls by the Food and Drug Administration. “We bounce that information out to others so they can check their products and not serve a food that may be potentially unsafe,” she said.But Nelson acknowledges that even outside the office her job has its occupational hazards.“I’ll go to a potluck supper, look at the potentially hazardous foods, and determine which ones I think are safe to eat,” she said with a laugh.Before coming to Harvard, Nelson worked as a city health inspector. “People always asked me where they shouldn’t eat,” she said. “Due to confidentiality, I could never reveal that, so instead I just told them to watch where I go to eat on Friday night and follow me there.”An avid swimmer, Nelson relishes Massachusetts’ lakes, though she sometimes considers the transmissibility of influenza via waterfowl. “I don’t think most people worry about those things,” she joked. “My job does affect me. It’s hard for it not to.”Her advice to those of us cooking today: “It’s important to keep food refrigerated at 41 degrees or below, and to wash your hands before you start. My motto is: Prevent.”last_img read more

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PBK welcomes new members

first_imgAdams: Daniel Eric Herz-Roiphe, social studies; Xin Pan, applied math; Koning Shen, chemical and physical biology; and Lena Yuan-Ning Young, organismic and evolutionary biology.Cabot: Stacy Lynn Carlson, economics; Zhou Fan, math; Jessica Nicole Lacy, chemistry; Matthew Jacob Rubenstein, economics; Alice Tzeng, chemical and physical biology; and Michael Anthony Viscardi, math.Currier: Amanda Roman Mangaser, government.Dunster: Victoria Simone Dubnow Aschheim, music; and Andrei Cristea, economics.Eliot: HyunJin Kim, social studies; and Alexandra Attkisson Petri, English.Kirkland: Trevor Jon Bakker, social studies; and Katherine Martelle Thompson, African and African American studies.Leverett: David Daniel Aguilar, psychology; Jeremy Mark Booher, math; Kristen Elizabeth Calandrelli, anthropology; Kaitlyn Ella Coil, chemical and physical biology; Diane Beatrix de Gramont, social studies; Rachel Ann Esplin, East Asian studies; Judith Ellen Fan, neurobiology; John McLean Kearney, physics; Eva Zhen Lam, social studies; and Matthew Ka Loong Lee, economics.Lowell: Nour Kibbi, history of science; Charles Richard Melvoin, history and literature; Christopher Andrew Oland, engineering sciences; Julia Anne Rudolf, human evolutionary biology; and Yifan Zhang, economics.Mather: Matthew Ross Bloom, history; Catherine Martha Sirois, sociology; and Roxolana Wacyk, economics.Pforzheimer: Gage Russell Caligaris, applied math; and Melissa Tran, sociology.Quincy: Tamar Holoshitz, linguistics; Laura Beth Kaplan, history; Caitlin Marie Kennedy Marquis, history of art and architecture; and Joseph Paul Zimmerman, computer science.Winthrop: Sebastien Dominik Arnold, history; Ilan Joseph Caplan, music; John Paul Fred Chilazi, economics; Daniela Franca  Joffe, literature; Gerald Chunt-Sein Tiu, chemical and physical biology; Pierce Tria, government; and Harold Yihao Wu, music. The Harvard College chapter of Phi Beta Kappa (PBK), Alpha Iota of Massachusetts, has elected 48 seniors to its Class of 2010.The Alpha Iota of Massachusetts chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was first established under a charter in 1779. Shifting from a social and debating club in its early years to an undergraduate honor society in the 19th century, PBK is known as the oldest academic honor society in the country.Phi Beta Kappa’s national mission is to foster and recognize excellence in the liberal arts and sciences, and election to Alpha Iota of Massachusetts signifies that an undergraduate has demonstrated excellence, reach, originality, and rigor in his or her course of study. The honor society recognizes students whose course work demonstrates not only high achievement, but also breadth of interest, depth of understanding, and intellectual honesty. Twenty-four juniors are elected each spring, 48 seniors each fall, and a further number sufficient to bring the total membership to no more than 10 percent of the graduating class in the final election shortly before Commencement.Elected seniors include:last_img read more

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Medical School revises conflict of interest policy

first_imgHarvard Medical School (HMS) released a series of revisions to its conflict of interest (COI) policy today that strengthens its commitment to transparency and financial disclosure while recognizing the School’s commitment to industry collaboration.Among many provisions, the new policy includes a streamlined central system for reporting faculty financial interests with industry; requires the public disclosure of certain faculty financial interests; bans faculty from accepting corporate gifts, including travel and meals; and ends faculty participation in industry speakers bureaus, making it one of the most stringent of any medical college in the country. In addition, faculty disclosures will be made available to the public on the Harvard Catalyst website.“In all cases where financial interests are involved, an essential antidote to potential harm is transparency,” said HMS Dean Jeffrey S. Flier. “And so disclosure of relevant financial interests, both internally and for the first time publicly, will address this concern.”Flier, the Caroline Shields Walker Professor of Medicine, said the updated policy is aimed at clarifying appropriate relationships between the School and its industry contacts. It will protect the interests of the public and maintain the integrity of Harvard’s faculty and institutions, he said, while providing clarity of expectations in collaboration between companies and Harvard faculty.A comprehensive re-evaluation of the existing COI regulations has been a top priority for Flier since he was named dean in 2007, and the revised guidelines are the latest in a series of regular changes to a policy created in 1990.In January 2009, Flier convened the Harvard University Faculty of Medicine Committee on Conflicts of Interest and Commitment. The 34-member panel includes HMS faculty, senior administrators, and students. His request to the group: Devise a new set of recommendations for the faculty policy, based on changes in the biomedical field and grounded in modern conventions and practices.Ganesh Shankar — a medical student member of the committee — thought the new standards were an exciting reshaping of the “educational infrastructure” at HMS.“Medicine is constantly changing,” he said, “and we recognize that education in medicine must be equally dynamic.”The committee’s recommendations, accepted by Flier, will be formally incorporated into the School’s COI policy starting in January.The HMS group is a subcommittee of a University-wide body led by David Korn, Harvard’s vice provost for research, which recently conducted its own rigorous review of Harvard’s COI policies and principles.Previous HMS policy had regulated faculty interactions with industry for more than 20 years. The new guidelines include:A streamlined central system for reportingfaculty financial interests with industryA public website for disclosure of certainfaculty financial interestsNopersonal gifts from industry, includingtravel and mealsNo facultyparticipation in industry speakersbureausA furtherstrengthening of existing limitationson faculty financial interests in companies that own or licensetechnologiesstudied in clinical researchNew limitations on industry support for Continuing Medical Education(CME)coursesNew training forstudents and faculty oncritical decision making regarding companies that make drugs or medicaldevicesNew review requirements on proposed facultyboard memberships with for-profit companies.Flier, a strong proponent of industry collaboration, has acknowledged that relationships between industry and academics involve an element of risk. “Some relationships,” he wrote in a white paper last year, “require scrutiny, analysis, institutional guidance, and, in specific cases, prohibition.”However, even as he announced the new, more stringent guidelines, Flier wanted to make absolutely clear that the goal was not to create a wall between industry and medicine. “That would be precisely the wrong thing to do at a time when we want to promote and develop human health,” he said. “Doing that requires effective interactions between industry and academia of a kind that are judged to be appropriate.”The central theme of the revised policy is transparency and increased disclosure of industry relationships, especially as related to ongoing research. They reinforce the restrictions already in place by:Prohibiting sponsorship of any research projectby a business in which a faculty members holds equity. The prohibitionisabsolute if the business is privately held. If the business is publiclytraded,then a faculty member’s financial interest in the company cannot exceed$30,000a year.Prohibiting clinical research on a technologyowned or licensed to a business with which the faculty member receives morethat $10,000 in annual income. (The previous limit was $20,000.)Reporting of outside relationships with industry, includingthose relevant to ongoing faculty research, will continue to be part of ayearly disclosure process. And for the first time, Harvard will workwith its16 affiliated hospitals and institutions to capture all requiredinformationthrough a common reporting mechanism for the approximately 12,000HarvardMedical School employees who work at the Medical School and itsaffiliatedhospitals and institutions. Previously, each organization managed itsowndisclosure process.Also for the first time, such financial disclosures will also be made publicly available on the HMS Catalyst website and will be part of a comprehensive institutional monitoring system. In certain instances, financial disclosures will also be subject to review by the HMS Standing Committee on Conflict of Interest.The new disclosure mechanism, Flier said, will allow HMS to identify any potentially troubling trends and “areas where there might be a need for further policy revision.”The new recommendations will also prohibit faculty participation in industry speakers bureaus if only industry presentations are used.“It’s one of the biggest departures in the policy,” said Flier. “If you are Harvard Medical faculty, you can’t function as a member of a speakers bureau and give company-determined and prepared talks. It’s vital that our faculty maintain their intellectual control.”The new guidelines also impact the small percentage of Harvard’s Continuing Medical Education courses that receive company funding.Building on previous requirements, the new recommendations state that a course must be funded by more than one industry sponsor, with no one sponsor being able to support more than 50 percent of a particular course’s budget.As part of the new policy, HMS will also develop a dean’s fund. It will solicit unrestricted industry donations to support Harvard’s Continuing Medical Education efforts, including research on best CME practices and technology-based teaching methods. “There will be no connection between the company and what we do with it,” said Flier.He added that the fund “ties into the broader interest of how to use Harvard Medical School to have a positive influence in the world.”Included in the new policy is a broad statement, in compliance with Massachusetts law, that prohibits the faculty from receiving industry-sponsored personal gifts of any kind. The new HMS gifts requirement will also extend to nonclinical faculty.“Even if you are a Ph.D. scientist working on cells or mice you are subject to this policy,” said Flier. “We are now saying that this is part of our overall faculty policy.”The updated HMS COI policy, said Korn, who heads the University’s efforts on COI policy, will further the School’s dedication to professional codes, institutional values, integrity, and transparency. It will also help HMS continue its efforts to enhance the future health of the country. “When all parties are clear on the rules governing potential relationships, and compliant with them, the hope is that more collaborations may be fostered and the significant educational, research, and health benefits captured for the benefit of the public.”Under our new policy, we will limit potential abuses,” wrote Flier in an article appearing on the HMS website, “while promoting our great capacity to do good.”Additional reportingby Colleen Walshlast_img read more

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Harvard Art Museums announce traveling exhibitions of works by Lyonel Feininger

first_imgThe Harvard Art Museums present two traveling exhibitions devoted to underexplored aspects of the work of Lyonel Feininger (1871–1956), one of the major figures of European modernism. Lyonel Feininger: Drawings and Watercolors from the William S. Lieberman Bequest to the Busch-Reisinger Museum highlights an important recent acquisition of a stunning group of drawings and watercolors from the collection of the legendary curator. Lyonel Feininger: Photographs, 1928–1939, assembled primarily from Harvard University’s Houghton Library, is the first to explore the artist’s little-known photographic work. Drawing on vast but largely untapped resources and new research, the two exhibitions and their accompanying catalogues examine the aesthetic and intellectual dimensions of Feininger’s achievements within each of these distinct media. Many of the works included have never before been exhibited or published and thus allow for a fresh assessment of this otherwise well-known figure.Feininger at Harvard: Drawings, Watercolors, and Photographs, which encompasses both exhibitions, will be presented in Germany at the Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin from Feb. 25 to May 15, 2011, and the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich from June 2 to July 17, 2011. Lyonel Feininger: Photographs, 1928–1939 then travels to the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, where it will be on view from Oct. 25, 2011 to March 11, 2012. In Los Angeles it will be complemented by a related installation of photographs by Bauhaus masters and students from the Getty’s collection. The final venue for the photography exhibition will be the Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, from March 30 to June 2, 2012, where it will be accompanied by a selection of works from the drawings and watercolors exhibition.last_img read more

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For love of the creepy, crawly

first_imgMore than 200 biologists who study the creepy, crawly world of insects, clams, snails, and other invertebrates are at Harvard this week, exchanging ideas and getting to know each other in the 2nd International Congress on Invertebrate Morphology.The biologists, who hail from about 20 countries, are participating in a four-day event ending Thursday (June 23) that is packed with technical presentations and discussions on invertebrate form, function, and development.Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Gonzalo Giribet, the incoming president of the International Society of Invertebrate Morphology, organized the event, which is hosted by Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH).Attendees will hear discussions of neurophylogeny, or the study of the nervous system and its use to determine how creatures are related to each other, developmental biology, the morphological evolution of arthropods, and invertebrates as parasites, among other topics.Giribet said attendees not only will share new findings and discuss scientific trends, but will also be able to examine special collections at the MCZ and at its Ernst Mayr Library. They’ll also examine the glass sea creatures, a lesser-known collection created in the 1800s by the artists who created the HMNH’s famed glass flowers, the Blaschkas.last_img read more

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