Hybrid lettings firm raises £2.29 million from investors and government Covid fund

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Hybrid lettings firm raises £2.29 million from investors and government Covid fund previous nextAgencies & PeopleHybrid lettings firm raises £2.29 million from investors and government Covid fundNearly 580 investors including HM Treasury’s Covid Future Fund have invested in the company, which claims to now have 7,000 properties on its books.Nigel Lewis10th August 20200561 Views Hybrid lettings agency Howsy has raised an additional £2.29 million in funding via the Seedrs crowdfunding platform after asking for just £250,000.This includes £1.14 million from the government’s Coronavirus Future Fund which offers matched backing for start-ups that are either pre-revenue or pre-profit and which are not eligible to receive support cash from other schemes, in return for equity in the companies involved.But even with the taxpayer funds, Howsy has still been over-funded by £900,000 on top of its initial funding target, raising £1.15 million. This in turn has been doubled by the Future Fund cash.So far 573 people have invested in Howsy’s latest Seedrs campaign, most chipping in a few thousand pounds each plus a single, anonymous investor who stumped up £250,000.The cash raised is clear proof that investors believe that online lettings agency platforms like Howsy will grab a sizeable chunk of the private rental market.In its pitch document Howsy claims to have 7,000 properties listed within its ‘marketplace’ and 81 staff, and in the past the company says some 60,000 landlords and tenants have used its service.The firm’s CEO Callum Brannan (left) says the new cash is part of a planned larger investment round in 2020, but in the short-term the funds will be used for working capital and growth marketing.His company claims to be challenging the traditional ‘over-priced and under-serviced’ lettings model by offering landlords an online tenant find and tenancy/property management service, the latter being backed by a central team of telephone-based staff.Howsy generates revenue from charging a fixed fee of £39 per month outside London to £115 per month in London, but also claims to generate £1,000 per managed property by finding tenants, conducting viewings and taking photos.This latest raise follows a £5 million raise last year from institutional investors through more traditional channels.Future Fund Rishi Sunak calum brannan Howsy August 10, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Swimmers prepare for Varsity

first_imgOxford University Swimming Club has just returned from a fantastic training camp in Lignano, which we hope will be a precursor to victory in the Hilary varsity competition. In 2008 we have relocated our training camp to a purpose-built training village in Italy, which incorporated an Olympic sized swimming pool for intensive long course training, a 25 metre pool for short course sprint work, and a state of the art multi-gym and sports hall complex. Swimmers took part in four hours of intensive coached pool training each day, combined with plyometrics, flexibility, and team building exercises, in preparation for what promises to be the most closely fought Varsity Match of the last decade. Many returning swimmers commented on the excellent facilities, which are unrivalled anywhere in England. The pool, which was ten lanes wide, fifty metres long, and built for the 2006 European Youth Championships, was outstanding. We were delighted to have all ten lanes to ourselves on a number of occasions, and when we shared the pool it was with the likes of the Ukrainian national swimming team, the Spanish water polo team, and the Italian synchronised swimming team. Being surrounded by international sportsmen and women certainly spurred the squad on, especially through those gruelling midweek sets when exhaustion had already set in, but the end of the camp was not yet in sight. An afternoon spent in Venice at the halfway point provided a welcome few hours of recovery and, having visited St. Mark’s Square, the Bridge of Sighs, and the Doge’s Palace, we returned to the pool refreshed and ready for more hard training. As usual, training camp was a great success, even more so this year for its superb new location. The squad has returned feeling leaner, meaner, and faster, and ready to take on the Tabs in the forthcoming Varsity Match.by Lorna Wellingslast_img read more

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Pembroke provides food for 100 homeless people

first_img“I’ve always said that while we have one student in Collegewho needs our support the kitchens here will not shut”, said Kevin Dudley, Pembroke’sExecutive Chef. “We continue to look after those who have had to stay inresidence, and when the Council got in contact about this need in the widercommunity it seemed obvious that we could provide the solution. Pembroke College is providing homeless people in Oxford with three meals a day in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. The College is participating in a Council-run scheme which delivers food to three temporary homeless shelters. An email to Pembroke students suggested that the project may reach 100 people. Dame Lynne Brindley, Master of Pembroke, said: “Everyone inCollege is immensely proud of our catering team who are once again putting inextra effort to show the meaning of being a caring community.” The College is confident that the increased demand on thecatering team will not place staff or the 50 students remaining in college indanger. A College spokesperson confirmed to Cherwell that the smallnumber of staff adhere to social distancing policy and that drivers are askedto clean their hands and are provided with new pairs of gloves at each pick-up. “My team, who are working long shifts with small numbers onduty at a time, have been fantastic in stepping up.”center_img The scheme provides two hot meals and a cold breakfast, which are delivered by volunteer drivers each day. Coordinated by Oxford City Council, the scheme began a two-week trial period on Saturday, with the aim of an extension if successful. Thousands of meals will be provided, offered by the College at cost price. The Council has taken further measures to help homeless people during the crisis. 100 hotel rooms have been leased to provide accommodation, whilst the Porch day centre for homeless and vulnerable people has launched a £20,000 COVID-19 Response Fund. However, the Council reports that some rough sleepers have not yet been accommodated or have refused offers of accommodation. Image Credit to Djr Xi / Wikimedia Commons. License: CC-BY-SA-4.0,3.0,2.5,2.0,1.0.last_img read more

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Vanderburgh County Commissioners April 17, 2018 Meeting Agenda

first_imgDepartment Head ReportsNew BusinessJob Fair: May 10, 2018 1:00-3:00 at the CK Newsome CenterCounty Employee Burdette Park Passes  Public CommentConsent ItemsContracts, Agreements and LeasesOld Courthouse: Renewal Lease Agreement with Fosse & Associates Architects, Inc. Suites 100 &101 Old BusinessCounty Auditor: February & March 2018 Accounts Payable Vouchers Approval to Pay (2) County Council Claims  civic center AGENDA of Vanderburgh County Board of CommissionersApril 17, 2018 at 3:00 pm, Room 301Call to OrderAttendancePledge of AllegiancePermission to Open Bids: VC18-04-02: Repair & Repaving of Baumgart Road Action Items GAGE Update with Ellen Horan Discussion of Health Savings Account Opportunity with Tony FlittnerFirst Reading of Ordinance CO.05-18-010: Driving Past Barricades Final Reading of Ordinance CO.04-18-009: Amending Chapter 6.05 of the County Animal Control Policy Surplus Request: Area Plan Commission for a Vehicle Soil and Water Conservation District: March 26, 2018 Monthly Report County Clerk: March 2018 Monthly Report County Treasurer: March 2018 Monthly ReportBurdette Park: Food Quotes 2018Road Closure Request: St. Jude Give Hope. Runcenter_img AdjournmentFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Approval of April 3, 2018 Meeting MinutesEmployment Changes Letter to Indiana Gaming Commission Regarding Bingo at the Coliseum Superintendent of County Buildings:Old Courthouse Pump Repair QuoteOld Courthouse DeBra-Kuempel’s Preventative Maintenance Service Agreement Three Year Renewal United Neighborhoods of Evansville: March 2018 Monthly Report Travel Request: Veteran’s Services County Clerklast_img read more

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Harvard Art Museums announce traveling exhibitions of works by Lyonel Feininger

first_imgThe Harvard Art Museums present two traveling exhibitions devoted to underexplored aspects of the work of Lyonel Feininger (1871–1956), one of the major figures of European modernism. Lyonel Feininger: Drawings and Watercolors from the William S. Lieberman Bequest to the Busch-Reisinger Museum highlights an important recent acquisition of a stunning group of drawings and watercolors from the collection of the legendary curator. Lyonel Feininger: Photographs, 1928–1939, assembled primarily from Harvard University’s Houghton Library, is the first to explore the artist’s little-known photographic work. Drawing on vast but largely untapped resources and new research, the two exhibitions and their accompanying catalogues examine the aesthetic and intellectual dimensions of Feininger’s achievements within each of these distinct media. Many of the works included have never before been exhibited or published and thus allow for a fresh assessment of this otherwise well-known figure.Feininger at Harvard: Drawings, Watercolors, and Photographs, which encompasses both exhibitions, will be presented in Germany at the Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin from Feb. 25 to May 15, 2011, and the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich from June 2 to July 17, 2011. Lyonel Feininger: Photographs, 1928–1939 then travels to the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, where it will be on view from Oct. 25, 2011 to March 11, 2012. In Los Angeles it will be complemented by a related installation of photographs by Bauhaus masters and students from the Getty’s collection. The final venue for the photography exhibition will be the Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, from March 30 to June 2, 2012, where it will be accompanied by a selection of works from the drawings and watercolors exhibition.last_img read more

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ROTC works to ‘serve others’ with blood drive

first_img “A central idea of the military is looking to serve others at all times,” senior Army ROTC cadet Kyle Hanratty said. “This event is a great way for us to accomplish that goal.” The blood drive takes place from noon to 6 p.m. both days in the LaFortune Ballroom. The drive will be run by the service clubs of the Army, Navy and Air Force branches: the Alliance to Lead and Serve (ATLAS) Club, the Trident Naval Society and the Arnold Air Society.  Hanratty also said ATLAS is looking to have a group of students travel with non-ROTC Notre Dame students to Honduras during fall break to work in orphanages there.  Hanratty said the blood drive is open to all students, staff and faculty, not just ROTC students, and that campus-wide participation is necessary for the three service clubs to surpass last year’s total of 235 pints of blood donated. In order to address this “vital need” for blood as fully as possible, all the blood donated at the event will be given to the American Red Cross. In addition, snacks and drinks will be provided to all donors. The semi-annual blood drive is one of several service events sponsored by the three ROTC service clubs, including the Trident Naval Society’s 24-hour run around campus and ATLAS’s volunteer program at the Robinson Community Learning Center. center_img “Being in the military gives you a whole different perspective on the vital need for blood as a means of saving lives,” Hanratty said. “But that need is a common one that isn’t just limited to the military.” In keeping with the spirit of service at Notre Dame, the University’s three Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) branches are sponsoring their semi-annual blood drive today and Thursday. But Hanratty said achieving the blood donation goal is not simply a matter of beating last year’s total; rather, the more blood donated, the more people will benefit from the generosity of the Notre Dame community. “This blood drive and the other ROTC service projects really represent the military’s commitment to service,” Hanratty said. “But we need the help of all students to accomplish our service goals.”last_img read more

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ND alum founds new bus company

first_imgChristopher Cali, a 2014 alum and current graduate student of Notre Dame, recently started a company called Better Cheaper Bus LLC, which offers affordable transportation for Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students to both the O’Hare and Midway airports in Chicago.“Final steps with the University are being taken to have the buses use McKenna Hall as a departure point,” Cali said.Better Cheaper Bus identifies as a third party transportation provider with the central goal of making transportation more efficient as well as more affordable to students. Cali said the idea came to him when one of his friends experienced frustration with the transportation to Midwestern airports.“My friend, Rory Dunne, took a trip back home to Ireland, and [when he] came back here, [he] had a 5-hour layover using the current transportation service,” Cali said.Cali said it was his friend’s personal inconvenience that helped him to conceive the idea of Better Cheaper Bus. Dunne gave him the inspiration to start forming this small company within a short time frame.“It was the week before Thanksgiving … that we started talking about it,” Cali said. “Through interviews with students, we got a lot of good feedback to make it more efficient.”Cali said aside from benefitting students, Better Cheaper Bus also benefits the South Bend community by donating 20 percent of its profits to the South Bend Center for the Homeless.“When we were thinking about the business, we realized it typically fell around certain holidays,” Cali said. “We figured that we talk a lot about social responsibility, and the Center came up in our minds really quickly.”This donation is the reason behind the business’ slogan, “Ride With a Cause.” The money donated to the South Bend Center for the Homeless will help to finance the holiday dinners during the Christmas season.“Starting a business isn’t easy, and we’re learning a ton,” Cali said. “We circumvented difficulties by getting the word out early, talking to students and creating a “Request Time” button on our website.”Cali said the input of students is crucial to the entire entrepreneurial process and led to the “Request Time” button and student interviews. Through student feedback, Better Cheaper Bus could decide which times of year service would assist students the most.“We’re thinking of running it during Christmas … spring break and at the end of spring semester,” Cali said.Better Cheaper Bus aims to provide a more efficient option for transportation, and Cali also hopes to make the students’ experiences more comfortable and enjoyable.“We’re offering WiFi; we have phone chargers on board and hopefully a DVD player. All the while, you’re donating 20 percent of what you spend to charity,” Cali said. “It’s a simple way to give back without necessarily lifting a finger.”Tags: affordable transportation, better cheaper bus, better cheaper bus LLC, christopher cali, LLC, midway, oharelast_img read more

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A Marquee ‘Clean Coal’ Project Is Failing

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Ian Austen for the New York Times:An electrical plant on the Saskatchewan prairie was the great hope for industries that burn coal.In the first large-scale project of its kind, the plant was equipped with a technology that promised to pluck carbon out of the utility’s exhaust and bury it underground, transforming coal into a cleaner power source. In the months after opening, the utility and the provincial government declared the project an unqualified success.But the $1.1 billion project is now looking like a green dream.Known as SaskPower’s Boundary Dam 3, the project has been plagued by multiple shutdowns, has fallen way short of its emissions targets, and faces an unresolved problem with its core technology. The costs, too, have soared, requiring tens of millions of dollars in new equipment and repairs.“At the outset, its economics were dubious,” said Cathy Sproule, a member of Saskatchewan’s legislature who released confidential internal documents about the project. “Now they’re a disaster.”The utility that runs the project, SaskPower, and advocates for carbon capture argue that the setbacks are typical teething problems associated with any new and complex technology.“Over time, as more companies, countries engage in carbon capture and storage technologies, the price for everybody is going to come down,” Mike Marsh, the chief executive of SaskPower, told a legislative committee in January. “That will make it easier to employ.”The Boundary Dam Power Station sits near a wealth of resources not far from the North Dakota border.Hundreds of years of coal reserves are buried under the ground nearby, virtually eliminating transportation costs. And the mining creates employment in an area with limited job prospects.“It’s a low-cost, stable supply,” Mr. Marsh said. “There’s a tremendous opportunity in North America to continue to utilize coal.”To the utility and the provincial government, the process known as carbon capture and storage seemed tantalizing when a review of the power system began 11 years ago.The technology offered a way to stick with coal in a carbon-conscious era. It was especially attractive in Canada, where rising emissions from the oil sands have more than offset reductions elsewhere, including Ontario’s abandonment of coal-fired electrical generation.Through the process, machinery would first remove most of the soot and ash from the coal’s exhaust. The exhaust would then pass through a kind of chemical called an amine that would snatch the carbon, in the form of carbon dioxide, out of it. The gathered carbon dioxide, separated from the amine, would be compressed, moved through pipelines and ultimately buried underground.Variations of the technology have been used as far back as the 1920s. And small demonstration projects have largely worked, including one in Norway that opened in 2012.Boundary Dam, which received a major Canadian subsidy and opened in September 2014, was the first full-scale deployment of the technology to cut emissions from burning coal. Saskatchewan picked a process owned by Shell, encouraged by its history with petrochemicals.At the outset, the utility and the province said the project was working as intended, capturing 90 percent of the plant’s carbon. It was the equivalent, they said, of taking 250,000 cars off the road. Environmentalists and politicians from around the world came to check out Boundary Dam.But the success story disintegrated last November when Ms. Sproule, a member of the opposition New Democratic Party, unveiled the confidential documents in the provincial legislature. She wouldn’t identify the people who provided the documents, although the government confirmed their authenticity.The documents showed that the system was working at only 45 percent of capacity. One memo, written a month after the government publicly boasted about the project, cited eight major problem areas. Fixing them, it said, could take a year and a half, and the memo warned that it was not immediately apparent how to resolve some problems.A chart covering the first year of operation showed that the system often didn’t work at all. When it was turned back on after shutdowns for adjustments and repairs, the amount of carbon captured sometimes even dropped.The buoyant public remarks, Mr. Marsh said, accurately reflected the company’s early assessment of the system. “We were very optimistic when this plant came online,” he said.Still, he acknowledged that “there were a few statements that it was achieving more than it had.” Mr. Marsh characterized many of the problems as design issues, such as inadequate temperature control systems, rather than fundamental flaws.But Boundary Dam has exposed a problem with Shell’s process when used with coal exhaust. Despite the plant’s initial filtering, tiny particles of ash still remain in the exhaust and contaminate the amine, reducing its ability to grab carbon, Mr. Marsh said.The control room of a carbon capture and storage facility at Boundary Dam Power Station. Credit Michael Bell/CPTOR, via Associated Press“Over all, we are pleased with the performance of the capture technology,” Shell Canada said in a statement, adding that it was working with SaskPower “to optimize operations and capture any lessons that can be applied to improve future projects.”But the costs are piling up.One shutdown last spring to clean and replenish the chemical cost 17 million Canadian dollars. Mr. Marsh said that the company was still looking for a way to prevent the contamination.The repeated shutdowns have caused SaskPower to miss multiple carbon dioxide deliveries to Cenovus Energy, the Canadian oil company that signed a 10-year contract with the utility to buy most of the gas. (Cenovus uses carbon dioxide to force oil from largely depleted wells.) SaskPower has had to pay 7 million Canadian dollars in penalties, offsetting most of the 9 million Canadian dollars in payments received.On top of that, the carbon system is a voracious consumer of the electricity generated by Boundary Dam, which has 150 megawatts of capacity. Mr. Marsh testified that about 30 megawatts of capacity were consumed by the system, and an additional 15 to 16 megawatts were needed to compress the carbon dioxide.Tim Boersma, the acting director of the energy security and climate initiative at the Brookings Institution, said that extensive power loss is a significant factor keeping other utilities from following SaskPower’s lead.“That is exactly the reason this is not going to fly,” Mr. Boersma said. “The plant’s efficiency goes down so dramatically.”As it continues to sort out the plant’s problems, SaskPower is damping expectations. The utility cut its emissions reduction target for this year to 800,000 metric tons, from one million.The company said it is working with the engineering firm that designed the project to solve the problems and increase efficiency. Mr. Marsh said there were indications that performance was improving. Last month, the utility said the system was working at 67 percent of capacity.Even some environmentalists are hoping for a turnaround.George Peridas, a senior scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council’s climate and clean air program, said his group did not endorse the use of coal, but it accepted that coal would continue to be part of the energy mix.Carbon capture, he said, will be a “vital part” of reducing emissions. Based on discussions with SaskPower, Mr. Peridas said he was confident that Boundary Dam would eventually work out.“I don’t see any indication that the carbon capture system of this plant is broken,” Mr. Peridas said. “It’s had a bumpy start.”Technology to Make Clean Energy From Coal Is Stumbling in Practice A Marquee ‘Clean Coal’ Project Is Failinglast_img read more

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A Strong Partnership with Its Neighbors

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo May 04, 2017 Barbados is nestled in the heart of the eastern Caribbean; it has white sandy beaches, calm blue waters, and sharp cliffs that attract tourists from around the world. But, like its neighbors, it also faces security challenges that are making its security forces become ever more vigilant. Drug trafficking, illegal weapons trafficking, and other criminal activities are keeping the Barbados Defence Force (BDF) very busy at sea and on land to neutralize criminal actions.Created in 1979, the BDF is responsible for the defense of Barbados and such other duties as the Defense Board determines. The military organization has three components: the Barbados Regiment (land force), the Barbados Coast Guard (maritime element), and the Barbados Cadet Corps.Colonel Glyne Grannum, chief of staff and commander of the BDF, spoke with Diálogo at the “Caribbean Regional Seminar on Countering Transregional Transnational Threat Networks (T3N)” celebrated in Bridgetown, Barbados, from March 21st-23rd. Among the topics discussed, Col. Grannum stated they are making progress on regional security cooperation in order to jointly confront threats networks. He also spoke about the BDF’s mission, goals and priorities for 2017.Diálogo: What is the importance of the seminar being held in Barbados, and of the BDF serving as its co-host?Colonel Glyne Grannum, BDF commander: The BDF takes particular pride and benefit from co-hosting the seminar in Barbados with the Regional Security System (RSS). We recognize the importance of the security of the Caribbean region, the security of the RSS’ area of operation as well as the security of the entire hemisphere because the issues we face are transnational threats that migrate freely across all our porous borders. The seminar is a huge opportunity for us to be able to meet, exchange ideas, and discuss policies and strategies to counter the T3N. We are honored to have such a great group of people from the Perry Center come here and share their views on transnational threats as well as the Caribbean states, their military forces, police forces, other security services, like customs and immigration, and Ministry of Defense officials. The seminar really helps to illustrate and harness the different points of view and experiences of all persons involved in defense, because the security community comprised of the forces and agencies of all the countries participating essentially comprises an alliance needed to counter transnational security problems.Diálogo: What does the BDF expect to gain from this seminar?Col. Grannum: First, to reinforce the positions of our fellow member states and international partners in defense in the hemisphere to strengthen their strategies and programs to counter the T3N. Doing so benefits Barbados as we, too, redouble our national strategies. Second, will be the development of our middle- to senior-level officers who need exposure at this level and need to better understand the transnational issues, so ultimately they can better participate in future events like security operations, programs, and strategies to secure our country.Diálogo: What is the BDF’s main focus?Col. Grannum: Our main focus is the defense and security of Barbados. In fact, our function involves working as part of the modern joint interagency family of security forces and services. One of our main objectives is to improve operational cooperation and effectiveness with the Royal Barbados Police Force through the provision of military assistance to the civil power. Our mission also includes –as a member of the RSS and as a member of the wider Caribbean community– to be able to conduct similar joint and combined operations with regional partners to deal with domestic and transregional security problems. At the same time, we don’t want to lose sight of the need to perform civil defense operational tasks, as we are in the middle of a very active hurricane zone. Our role is very broad in terms of dealing with many multidimensional and intertwined threats and environmental risks. We will continue to deal with security challenges, transnational organized crime, and also be ready to deal with the effects of terrorism in the region and humanitarian assistance tasks.Diálogo: What is the focus of your military efforts as Chief of Staff of the BDF?Col. Grannum: In addition to the focus of the BDF as a whole, our military effort includes maintaining a presence in our maritime domain with the ability to monitor and interdict illegal activities. On land our focus is to be ready to support the civil power, the police force, in all aspects of operations and provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief throughout both land and sea domains.Diálogo: The BDF was established in 1979, how do its main components –Barbados Regiment, Barbados Coast Guard, and Barbados Cadet Corps– work together?Col. Grannum: They work together very well. The Force Headquarters is the superior authority of the three units. There is a very high measure of interoperability between the Barbados Regiment, as the land force, and the Barbados Coast Guard, as the maritime component of the force, in terms of providing security services across the island of Barbados. Very efficient and very effective interoperability has been one of our main strengths over the years.Diálogo: What is the BDF’s role at the RSS?Col. Grannum: The RSS has seven Member States: Antigua and Barbuda, the Commonwealth of Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and of course, Barbados. The RSS Member States forces apply a collaborative effort for the security of the region. The BDF’s role as part of the RSS is to contribute militarily, jointly on land and at sea, and to be ready to participate in deliberate operations or quick responses, to deal with security challenges in any of the Member States. Since its creation in 1982, the BDF has participated in numerous humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations as well as a number of security operations that brought tactical resources from seven Member States together. The BDF also has the distinction of acting in a more deliberate way as part of a wider cooperation and treaty arrangement with CARICOM [the Caribbean Community] for example, participating in operations in Haiti (1994 – 1996) and the Cricket World Cup (2007). More recently the BDF was a part of the RSS’ assistance humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions to Dominica after the passage of Tropical Storm Erica (2015) and to the Royal St. Christopher and Nevis Police Force in Saint Kitts and Nevis for security operations (2016).Diálogo: What is your biggest concern in terms of regional security in Barbados?Col. Grannum: Regional security has been dominated for many years by threats of narcotrafficking and the shipments of marijuana and cocaine from South America to North America and into Europe, and the effects of the increase of criminality with violent gang crimes in particular. We should not lose sight either of the public health effects of drug and arms trafficking where there are very negative effects within communities and states. In the immediate future, and as was documented in open media sources, there seems to be an increase in cocaine production in some of the South American growing regions. Drug trafficking, as well as the smuggling of illegal weapons and potentially people across our borders will likely remain the most significant threats which we must actively address and confront.In regard to terrorism, we know the global environment is still unstable as we have seen horrific events play out in Europe, in parts of Africa, and in the United States. Lone-wolf attacks by individuals that are either inspired by or in some cases directed remotely by terrorist organizations and ideologies to commit horrible attacks, unfortunately continue. Our focus is on the prevention of any terrorist attack in Barbados and in the wider RSS and Caribbean region. Our efforts must include the continued sharing of information and resources to prevent and respond if necessary, to give the communities we serve the confidence that their security forces are aware of the global threat and are prepared for it. Cyber attacks are a third area of concern requiring focused attention and urgent operational readiness.Diálogo: How do you cooperate with neighboring nations to defeat T3N?Col. Grannum: The BDF has a very strong partnership with all RSS and non-RSS neighboring countries. We cooperate fully with the Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force and their Coast Guard for maritime security threats, and have a very good working relationship with the French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe. I am very optimistic that the working relationships with all countries in the region will grow stronger in the face of the security threats which may arise in the future.Diálogo: What are your/the BDF’s priorities for 2017?Col. Grannum: We are scheduled to co-host Exercise Tradewinds 2017 in June of this year. The first phase is going to be held here in Barbados, focusing on HADR response, counter terrorism and counter transnational organized crime operations at the operational and tactical levels. Trinidad and Tobago is hosting the second phase of the Exercise. Our priority at this time therefore on readiness to participate in Tradewinds as a vehicle for overarching force mission readiness. Beyond Tradewinds, our focus will be on national HADR efforts to deal with the annual hurricane season which runs from June to November.Diálogo: Is there anything you’d like to add for our regional readers?Col. Grannum: For a long time, the BDF has enjoyed rich and robust partnerships in terms of the community of the military, police and other security agencies, not just within the RSS, and beyond within CARICOM, but extending in depth across the entire hemisphere. We are pleased that the Perry Center could bring this seminar to Barbados. Our purpose and determination is well set in terms of delivering our national and collective alliance missions to deal with the modern transnational threats as they exist, whether those threats are from terrorist organizations, violent extremist groups or drug trafficking organizations. I think we have enormous networked capabilities to rely on by leveraging national resources in harmony with our neighbors. Our regional collaborative efforts will achieve success in dealing with the threats.last_img read more

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Getting familiar with your Foundation – Hannibal Brumskine

first_imgThis is the second edition of our new “Getting Familiar with Your Foundation” series on our blog! Each month we will highlight a different member of our Foundation staff so you can get to know the people who make our work possible. Last month we got to know Executive Director Gigi Hyland. This month, get to know Foundation CFOO Hannibal Brumskine!Here are some lessons in leadership and things you might not know about Hannibal:When you aren’t at work, what are we most likely to find you doing?Reading, walking and quality time with family.Do you have a guilty pleasure? If so what is it?I have a sweet tooth.What is your favorite book?“Only the Paranoid Survive” by Andrew Grove. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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