Video: The Rev. Brenda Griton-Mitchell reflects on the Way of…

first_imgVideo: The Rev. Brenda Griton-Mitchell reflects on the Way of the Cross Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 26, 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET DC Stations, Gun Violence, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Advocacy Peace & Justice, Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] The Rev. Brenda Griton-Mitchell, director of the Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships of the U.S. Department of Education, reflects on the importance of the March 25 Way of the Cross procession after its conclusion in a cold and rainy Washington, D.C. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Video TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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Canadian women begin monastic journey as ‘Companions on the Way’

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Communion, Tags Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL By Gavin Drake Posted Sep 27, 2016 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Women’s Ministry Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion News Service] Five young women are beginning a year-long monastic journey as part of a new Companions on the Way program. They were commissioned earlier this month by Huron Coadjutor Bishop Linda Nicholls, and will spend the next 12 months living alongside members of the Sisterhood of St John the Divine at their convent in Toronto, Ontario.Full article. Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Featured Eventscenter_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canadian women begin monastic journey as ‘Companions on the Way’ Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

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All Our Children network’s end offers tough lessons for Episcopal…

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC By David PaulsenPosted Aug 2, 2019 Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska All Our Children network’s end offers tough lessons for Episcopal work on education equity, poverty Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET center_img Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Racial Justice & Reconciliation Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Boston worked with suburban churches to create a library at Blackstone Elementary School in 2011. St. Stephen’s has for years developed relationships with the school’s students, parents and teachers through its after-school program. Photo: St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church[Episcopal News Service] Sixty-five years after the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, the American public education system remains overwhelmingly separate and unequal. In February 2019, the advocacy organization EdBuild put a number on the problem: $23 billion.That is the national funding gap between mostly white and mostly nonwhite school districts, despite comparable numbers of students, EdBuild found. Inequitable funding policies that prioritize where a child lives over communities’ financial resources have “led to an endlessly unfair system that is stacked against our most vulnerable children,” the report concludes.For evidence, look no further than the library at Blackstone Elementary School in Boston. A decade ago, the school didn’t have one.What Blackstone had back then was a growing partnership with the neighboring St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, a largely black and Latino congregation in Boston’s South End. For years, church volunteers had developed relationships with teachers, students and parents through St. Stephen’s after-school program. The church also welcomed volunteers from white suburban churches, who were appalled to learn Blackstone had no library. In 2011, the suburban church volunteers helped open a library at the school, and they continue today to staff it.“When they understood more about education equity, they were ready [to act], because they knew the kids,” the Rev. Liz Steinhauser, the church’s youth programs director, told Episcopal News Service.Successful church-school partnerships start with listening and grow through personal relationships, Steinhauser and other members of The Episcopal Church’s All Our Children network told ENS. But their local ministries weren’t enough to sustain a national network of dioceses and congregations championing education equity. After seven years, All Our Children is disbanding. In a July 10 email to supporters, network director Lallie Lloyd cited long-term financial uncertainty, limited churchwide support and challenges related to “our previously unexamined internalized white supremacy.”Established education ministries interested in applying for one of All Our Children’s grants have until Aug. 8 to submit applications. Info is at allourchildren.org/grants.All Our Children formed in 2012 as the churchwide successor to a Diocese of New York ministry of the same name. With significant startup funding from New York’s Trinity Church Wall Street, it held trainings, webinars and conferences for people, like Steinhauser and her team, who are driven by their faith to the work of eliminating systemic inequality in American public education.The network’s greatest accomplishment, according to church leaders interviewed by ENS, was to bring together Episcopalians engaged in similar ministries to learn from and support each other. Despite those successes, however, All Our Children couldn’t overcome what even its top supporters now see were ill-fated blind spots, particularly those related to white privilege and the evolving social justice priorities of The Episcopal Church.The network has $80,000 remaining in unrestricted donations that it is in the process of distributing as grants to diocesan and church ministries. Applications will be accepted through Aug. 8, with the grants to be awarded in September.“We believe, and have from the beginning, the unequal educational opportunities have deep structural roots,” Lloyd said in an interview with ENS. The network’s grants will target established ministries that have demonstrated an understanding of that dynamic. “We have never wanted to be only about charitable service to the children in our communities.”All Our Children Director Lallie Lloyd speaks at the network’s January 2018 symposium at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Columbia, S.C. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceExamples of active church-school partnerships are plentiful, but the national network’s emphasis on systemic change generated only mixed results at the local level.“We thought that if congregations partnered with local schools, their relationship would evolve from charitable direct service into public advocacy,” Lloyd said. “I think we would have to conclude that that doesn’t necessarily happen.”Zakiya Jackson agrees. She is vice president of training and resources for The Expectations Project, an advocacy organization that works with faith-based groups to promote education equity, and for the past year, she has served on the All Our Children board. She helped Lloyd organize the Episcopal network’s January 2018 symposium in Columbia, South Carolina.Zakiya Jackson of The Expectations Project served for a year on All Our Children’s board after helping to plan its January 2018 symposium. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“Something that starts off as service can pivot to advocacy. … But it can also stay service,” Jackson told ENS. “Without that intentionality from the beginning, I think it unintentionally sets people up to think that taking care of children is equity work, and that’s not the same thing.”A church volunteer’s pivot to advocacy typically hinges on a “conversion experience,” Steinhauser said, such as when her volunteers learned Blackstone didn’t have a library. Conversions often happen locally, though inequity in education is a nationwide problem.“Low-income students and students of color are often relegated to low-quality school facilities that lack equitable access to teachers, instructional materials, technology and technology support, critical facilities, and physical maintenance,” the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights said in a 2018 report on public education funding.Nearly one in four students in the United States attends what the U.S. Department of Education deems as high-poverty schools, filled disproportionately with nonwhite students. The department’s latest Condition of Education report shows about 45 percent of black and Hispanic students went to high-poverty schools in 2016, as opposed to only 8 percent of white students.“White supremacy wasn’t an accident, and inequity’s not an accident,” Jackson said. “We didn’t get here just because a few folks started neglecting kids. Everything was intentional.” Creating an equitable education system, then, “takes more study and more skill and more fervor than I think we often realize.”Decade of growth in network of churches focused on educationThe initial fervor behind All Our Children goes back to a book lent to Bishop Catherine Roskam in 2006: Jonathan Kozol’s “The Shame of the Nation.”The book was an indictment of the resegregation of American public schools, and Roskam, who was bishop suffragan of the Diocese of New York at the time, found its contemporary portrait “absolutely shocking.” She began noticing Kozol’s themes playing out in the neighborhoods that were home to the diocese’s churches.Many of the congregations had no relationships with their local schools. She started All Our Children to encourage connections between churches and schools, often bridging racial divides in the process.“I’m a person that looks a lot at what people can do immediately,” Roskam told ENS. Parishioners may be easily discouraged, wondering what one person can do to make a difference. “I think the answer to that is, one person can do a lot. At least, one person can do something.”Congregations of all sizes got involved, Roskam said. Parishioners served as chaperones on a Mount Vernon school’s field trips. They created a community garden at a Monroe school. The started an arts program at a school in Bronxville.“We were transformed by what we saw, and when that happens, you don’t go away and forget about that,” Roskam said.By the time Roskam retired in January 2012, leaders of Episcopal education ministries around the country had begun networking on their own. In October 2012, their conversations spawned an inaugural conference, convened by Trinity Wall Street and hosted by St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia, that launched the national All Our Children network. The Rev. Ben Campbell, a pastoral associate at St. Paul’s, detailed that church’s longtime partnership with Woodville Elementary School, which had grown into the citywide Micah Initiative, with 125 worshipping communities of all faiths sending volunteers into about 25 elementary schools. Other Episcopal leaders shared stories of their experiences, from Cleveland to Dallas. Such examples “gave me a new sense for what’s possible,” Steinhauser said.The Rev. Liz Steinhauser is director of youth programs at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Boston. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“I think my work [and] other people’s work is better, stronger and more creative when we’re connected to other folks,” she said, “being part of something larger than ourselves.”Lloyd was there representing Trinity Church Boston, and she soon was tapped to lead the national network as director. Trinity Church Boston agreed to serve as fiscal agent for All Our Children, which never incorporated as a separate nonprofit.After working as an education programming grants officer at Pew Charitable Trust, Lloyd had been providing consulting services for nonprofits in the Boston area and wanted to get more involved in faith-based efforts on the issue of education equity.“I felt a very strong longing to be able to use the moral passion that I find in my faith to talk about these inequities as a moral and ethical issue,” she told ENS.Trinity Wall Street remained the network’s largest financial backer, awarding about $850,000 in grants to All Our Children through 2019 that helped to cover staffing costs, travel to conferences, and the regional and national gatherings of Episcopal leaders that kept up the network’s momentum.“What I think Lallie and her colleagues were endeavoring to do was to make it a more national and less regional effort,” Massachusetts Bishop Alan Gates told ENS. He was a strong supporter of All Our Children, but the more effective networking seemed to happen locally, he said. “When we get together nationally, people’s contexts are so different.”Trinity Episcopal Cathedral volunteer Beth Yon shows a student some of the finer points of sewing a hem during an activity in 2018 at W.A. Perry Middle School in Columbia, South Carolina. The Diocese of Upper South Carolina has been active in education ministries and advocacy through the ecumenical Bishops’ Public Education Initiative. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceUpper South Carolina Bishop Andrew Waldo echoed those sentiments. His diocese hosted All Our Children’s biggest gathering, a three-day symposium in January 2018. But the symposium, nominally backed by a General Convention resolution, barely drew more than 100 participants. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry was scheduled to preach but canceled due to illness.“They did a wonderful job of trying to connect across the country,” Waldo said in an interview, expressing gratitude for Lloyd’s hard work. “To be a resource to congregations over such a geography might have been the most difficult part.”Lloyd alluded to that reality in her July 10 email to supporters. “Most people called to this work are called to serve their local communities and have limited capacity for the additional labor of building a national network,” she wrote.The network also struggled to raise enough money to make up for discontinued grants from Trinity Wall Street, which chose to phase out its financial support this year, Lloyd told ENS. And despite General Convention’s support for equity work, Episcopal leaders churchwide did not always share the enthusiasm of Gates, Waldo and a handful of other bishops, Lloyd said.Hope and caution for future of education equity workLloyd hinted at a more fundamental challenge with her reference to “white supremacy” in announcing the end of All Our Children. Lloyd told ENS she was acknowledging, as a white woman and a lay leader in a predominantly white Christian denomination, that she had not fully appreciated how All Our Children’s early development was hindered by power structures that privilege whiteness – through a lens that sees equity work as giving something of value to people in need.“That feels like toxic charity. It feels patronizing,” she said. “The danger is the way we talk and behave – in that way, we keep ourselves separate from the community around us.”All Our Children, from the start, lacked grounding in a coalition of diverse community partners, something that changed somewhat when Lloyd began collaborating with Jackson and The Expectation Project.By then, it may have been too late.Church-school partnerships are “not the same thing as creating an equitable school environment or creating an equitable school district,” Jackson said. “That requires a different sort of understanding of justice, a different understanding of whiteness.”Getting congregations and parishioners to that understanding often requires a leader who is an “agitator,” she added, a role not many people are comfortable filling.Steinhauser, for her part, has years of experience as a community organizer and is comfortable preaching on what might seem like thorny topics.But agitator? She suggested looking no further than the Gospel.The Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas picked up the theme in an interview with ENS about how education equity and race intersect with social justice issues, which she has elevated as dean of Episcopal Divinity School at Union Theological Seminary in New York.“Social justice work isn’t the extra. It’s the Gospel,” said Douglas, who also serves as Washington National Cathedral’s canon theologian. “That’s indeed why the presiding bishop has called us back into the Jesus Movement.” Social justice work shouldn’t be optional for Christians, she said. “This is what we call white privilege, the privilege of not doing it.”But how to do it right? Even the word “advocacy” carries the wrong connotations if it doesn’t first empower communities who have been disempowered by an unjust system, she said.“Before the church reaches out, the church needs to educate itself,” she said. “We don’t want to devolve into this old missionary model that The Episcopal Church was very good at, as if we were doing for a people what they can’t do for themselves.”Lloyd has attended a range of conferences to engage a broader spectrum of Christians and education advocates, from the Union of Black Episcopalians to something known as the Justice Conference. It was at the latter event, in 2016, that she met Jackson. The next year, they teamed up to lead a workshop at another conference, and Jackson agreed to help Lloyd plan the 2018 symposium in South Carolina.Campbell, the Richmond priest, said he thought highly of the “incredibly valiant work that Lallie and her staff did.” He also thought it helped to bring The Expectations Project on board, but he questioned whether a broad coalition of partners was something that could be effectively added midstream.“What would have happened if she had been able to be a part of a coalition like that from the beginning?” Campbell wondered. “I don’t know.”With the official network closing down, All Our Children members hardly see this as The Episcopal Church’s final word on education equity. The Rev. Rainey Dankel is among the hopeful.“I would not be surprised if individual relationships that came about as a result of that work do continue, because I think that we’re always trying to figure out better ways of doing what we’re doing,” said Dankel, who retired in March after seven years as associate rector at Trinity Church Boston.Dankel said she grew to appreciate that, in successful school partnerships and advocacy, “a lot of it has to do with, frankly, confronting white privilege and racism,” especially in Boston, where students of color are a majority in the public schools. It’s more than “just showing up with good intentions trying to fix some kids.”“We’re actually engaged in confronting and trying to transform both ourselves and our communities of which we are a part,” Dankel said, “which is a fundamental task of churches, that we are in the business of being transformed of God’s love and confronting our own complicity with the things that block people from experiencing that love.”She told a story of Trinity Church Boston’s relationship with McCormack Middle School. The church helped create a library at McCormack, similar to St. Stephen’s partnership with Blackstone. When a teacher at McCormack brought a class into the library for the first time, Dankel recalled one boy looking around in awe.“Wow,” the boy said. “This is so nice. What did we do to deserve this?”“Which is just so heartbreaking,” Dankel told ENS, “that he didn’t know that he deserves that.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Poverty & Hunger, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

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Santa Croce Goes To Japan / Boselli Arredamenti

first_img “COPY” Photographs Projects Area:  120 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Architects: Boselli Arredamenti Area Area of this architecture project Manufacturers: Fritz Hansen, Depadova, Källemo, Mox design, Reichenberg Weiss Firm, Seledue, Thut Mobel, ZeusNotoProject Of Structure, Installations And Supervision Of Works:Stefano Debiasi, Roberto DaneuElectrical Equipment:Skerk BorisCompany:Sandri Marco &, Mitia, Duino Aurisina (TS)Customer:private customerArchitect In Charge:Maximum Orio BoselliCity:Santa CroceCountry:ItalyMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Alessandra BelloRecommended ProductsPorcelain StonewareApariciPorcelain Tiles – BrickworkWoodAccoyaAccoya® CanalsPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural Solutions3D Facade PanelText description provided by the architects. In the small house, located in a village of the Karst region close to Trieste, practical sliding elements made in Dacron, appear in their lightness (at the same time items of furniture and lighting), concealing endless possibilities.This project takes place in a small town in the Karst plateau, not far from Trieste, characterized by its narrow alleys stretching around the old dwellings, overlooking the Gulf of Trieste.Save this picture!© Alessandra BelloThe will was that of avoiding the addition of an indoor staircase that of course it would have taken up too much room, so we have finally opted for connecting the different storeys, thanks to a tiny elevator and the staircase has been moved outside.Thus, space has become wider by giving the possibility to create new dimensions.Save this picture!SectionThe space is empty, just few dynamic elements with a light design represent those anchorage points to “make the conquest” and reinvent continually the space of experience.The total absence of furniture, substituted by lightweight sliding elements made in Dacron conceals endless possibilities, including the elevator.Save this picture!© Alessandra BelloThe same area on the ground floor can become a place for cooking, listening to music, meeting; on the first floor, a bedroom and a reading or listening room, while the second floor is a study that can be converted into a guest room.Save this picture!1st Floor PlanThe wall in Dacron becomes an  item of furniture, lighting and steady change of the space and ideally it extends to the first floor creating a continuity clearly visible from outside.Save this picture!© Alessandra BelloThis continuity is pointed out by a clear glass cutting, conceived to be walked, it is repeated on every loft corresponding  to the main façade and it allows to have a visual image on all floors, by highlighting the height of the building and the continuity of the light cutting and sliding elements.The fluid space winds the way, set completely free also thanks to the choice not to use any kind of close or door: this implies even more emphasis in the fluidity of every function.Save this picture!© Alessandra BelloThe dialogue with outside is strong and any hour of the day or night priorities areas move outside and vice versa, depending on how you want to live the space; it happens through a wide glass window and glazing placed on a slight metal stand.Save this picture!© Alessandra BelloThanks to some devices (complete closure of the front door on the ground floor and black sliding wall in Dacron on the first floor), the space can be lived in intimacy, but also it can be transformed by opening outwards, so becoming a place for meeting many people.Project gallerySee allShow lessGrimshaw and MDT-tex Unveil New Tessellating Canopy System in FrankfurtArchitecture NewsPrison Puzzle Winners AnnouncedArchitecture News Share Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/784718/santa-croce-goes-to-japan-boselli-arredamenti Clipboard Santa Croce Goes To Japan / Boselli ArredamentiSave this projectSaveSanta Croce Goes To Japan / Boselli Arredamenti CopyHouses, Renovation•Santa Croce, Italy Save this picture!© Alessandra Bello+ 20 Sharecenter_img ArchDaily Italy 2015 “COPY” Photographs:  Alessandra Bello Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Houses ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/784718/santa-croce-goes-to-japan-boselli-arredamenti Clipboard Santa Croce Goes To Japan / Boselli Arredamenti CopyAbout this officeBoselli ArredamentiOfficeFollowProductsSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationSanta CroceItalyPublished on April 02, 2016Cite: “Santa Croce Goes To Japan / Boselli Arredamenti” 02 Apr 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsFaucetsDornbrachtKitchen Fittings – EnoWoodSculptformTimber Tongue and Groove CladdingMembranesEffisusFaçade Fire Weatherproofing Solutions in Design District Project LondonHanging LampsLouis PoulsenPendant Lights – KeglenBlinds / Mosquito Nets / CurtainsBANDALUXPleated ShadesEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAWoodBlumer LehmannCNC Production for Wood ProjectsMaterials / Construction SystemsCaneplex DesignPoles – Tonkin BambooFibre Cement / ConcreteTegralFibre Cement Slate Roofing – Thrutone Endurance SmoothMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Biofuels Coalition Files Brief Challenging 31 Small Refinery Exemptions in 2018

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Biofuels Coalition Files Brief Challenging 31 Small Refinery Exemptions in 2018 Biofuels Coalition Files Brief Challenging 31 Small Refinery Exemptions in 2018 Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter The Renewable Fuels Association, Growth Energy, National Corn Growers Association, National Biodiesel Board, American Coalition for Ethanol, and National Farmers Union filed a brief challenging EPA’s August 2019 decision to exempt 31 small refineries from their obligations to comply with the Renewable Fuel Standard in 2018. Collectively known as the Biofuels Coalition for this case, the group submitted its filing to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing that EPA lacked the authority to issue such exemptions and that it acted in an arbitrary and capricious manner in attempting to do so.In its brief, the Coalition asserts some of the same arguments that the Renewable Fuels Association, NCGA, NFU, and ACE successfully made in the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals against three small refinery exemptions, including the fact that EPA lacked the authority to extend small refinery exemptions that had lapsed in earlier years.The Coalition also took on EPA’s failure to provide its own refinery-by-refinery analysis to support a finding of a disproportionate economic hardship, particularly in the 20 instances where EPA decided to grant a full exemption despite the Department of Energy recommending that only a partial exemption be granted. In addition, the Biofuels Coalition posed the same question on which the Tenth Circuit found EPA inexcusably silent: If all RFS compliance costs are ultimately passed through to end users and recovered, as EPA has repeatedly maintained, how is it that any small refinery can suffer a disproportionate economic hardship?“Among all of EPA’s indefensible actions surrounding small refinery exemptions in recent years, the Agency’s two-page decision to grant 31 waivers from 2018 RFS compliance really takes the cake. Enough is enough,” Coalition representatives said. “The EPA had absolutely no legal basis for continuing to destroy demand for renewable fuels, which is contrary to the intent of Congress for the RFS program.When it adopted the RFS in 2005, Congress clearly intended for small refinery exemptions to be temporary in nature. Yet, 15 years later, some refiners-most of whom have readily complied with RFS obligations in the past-are trying to claim they need more time to prepare for compliance with RFS requirements. If these exemptions were meant to be a ‘bridge to compliance’, as concluded by the courts, it should be obvious that we all crossed that bridge many years ago.”In prior years, EPA would respond separately to each small refinery exemption petition with several pages of analysis on the individual refinery’s unique circumstances. However, for the 2018 exemptions, EPA announced its decisions on more than three dozen refinery petitions in a single, two-page memorandum issued by Acting Assistant Administrator Anne Idsal. That brevity alone reflects EPA’s reflexive reaction to exempt oil interests from compliance whenever they asked without justification.Source: Renewable Fuels Association Previous articleCo-Alliance to Offer $20,000 in ScholarshipsNext articleUSDA Announces Increase to Certain Incentive Payments for Continuous Conservation Reserve Program Hoosier Ag Today SHARE By Hoosier Ag Today – Dec 9, 2020 SHARElast_img read more

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Update – Missing Derry man found

first_img Pinterest The 86 year old Derry man who went missing last evening has been found safe and well.William Doherty from the Culmore Road area of Derry, was reported missing yesterday having been last seen at a service station at the bottom of Glenshane Road at around 4.15pm.A cross border search was launched amid speculation he might have travelled to Fermanagh and then cropssed the border into Donegal. The PSNI have now confirmed he has been located and is safe. No further details have been released. WhatsApp Facebook WhatsApp Google+ Update – Missing Derry man found Previous articleInto the West accuse Translink of “continuing discrimination” against DerryNext articleJason Smyth through to 200m final admin Twitter 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Pinterest Twittercenter_img By admin – August 21, 2014 Google+ Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Homepage BannerNews Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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The Legislature In Its Wisdom Has Conferred Precedence On The POCSO Act Above The Atrocity Act: Gujarat HC [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesThe Legislature In Its Wisdom Has Conferred Precedence On The POCSO Act Above The Atrocity Act: Gujarat HC [Read Order] Sparsh Upadhyay7 Oct 2020 2:24 AMShare This – xThe Gujarat High Court on Monday (05th October) ruled that the comparative analysis of provisions of both the Acts [Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989 & The Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, 2012] leads to the sole conclusion – that the legislature in its wisdom has conferred precedence on the POCSO Act above the Atrocity Act.Notably,…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Gujarat High Court on Monday (05th October) ruled that the comparative analysis of provisions of both the Acts [Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989 & The Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, 2012] leads to the sole conclusion – that the legislature in its wisdom has conferred precedence on the POCSO Act above the Atrocity Act.Notably, in the present matter, the Bench of Justice A. S. Supehia was confronted with the issue of maintainability of the an application filed under section 439 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 instead of an appeal under section 14-A(2) of the Scheduled Castes and Schedules Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989.The matter before the CourtPursuant to the offences registered vide C.R No.I-11187006200762 of 2020 for the offences under section 376, 376(d), 201 and 506(2) of Indian Penal Code, 1860, under sections 4 and 12 of the POCSO Act and sections 3(1) (r), 3(1) (w) (1), 3 (2) (v) of the Atrocity Act, at Lunavada Police Station, Dist. Mahisagar, the applicant was arrested on 22.05.2020.After filing of the charge-sheet, he filed Criminal Misc. Application No.272 of 2020 in the Court of Additional Sessions Judge & Special POCSO Judge & Special Atrocity Judge, Mahisagar at Lunwada.The same met with the fate of rejection vide order dated 09.07.2020. As a sequel, he filed the present application under section 439 of the Cr.P.C before the High Court.Argument put forth by the Counsel for the ApplicantIn the response, the advocate appearing for the applicant, placed reliance on the judgement dated 07.11.2019 of the Single Bench of the Hon’ble High Court of Judicature at Patna passed in the case of Guddu Kumar Yadav vs The State of Bihar Criminal Misc. No.52792 of 2019, and submitted that while dealing with the analogous issue, the Hon’ble Patna High Court has held that in a case involving offences under both Acts, i.e. the POCSO Act and the Atrocity Act, the same would not be appealable under section 14-A(2) of the Atrocity Act and only the bail application under section 439 of the Cr.P.C. would alone be maintainable.It was submitted by him that the POCSO Act, being a Special Act enacted for the purpose of protection of children would prevail over the Atrocity Act, hence the bail application under the provision of section 439 of the Cr.P.C. is precisely filed by the applicant.Argument put forth by the StateThe State raised the preliminary objection with regard to the maintainability, whereas it is the case of the applicant-accused that the application is precisely filed under the provision of section 439 of the Cr.P.C. as he is arrested in connection with the offences under the POCSO Act.While referring to the provision of Section 14-A(2) of the Atrocity Act, the Public Prosecutor urged that the application (filed under Section 439 CrPC) may be rejected as non-maintainable since the applicant has to file an appeal under the said provision (i.e., Section 14-A(2) of the Atrocity Act).He also submitted that section 14-A(2) was inserted vide Amendment Act, 2015, which is subsequent to the POCSO Act, 2012, and hence the later Act would prevail.The question before the CourtThe issue which needed deliberation was – whether the subsequent amendment in the Atrocity Act will have the overriding effect to the former POCSO Act by the virtue of “principle of later act will prevail”?Court’s AnalysisThe Court acknowledged the fact that the non-obstante clauses are manifested in both the Acts. There cannot be any scintilla of doubt that both the Acts are Special Acts enacted through the wisdom of the Legislature for the benefit of the respective classes.Further, the High Court cited two rulings of the Apex Court in the cases of Sarwan Singh Vs Kasturilal, AIR 1977 SC 265 and Bank of India vs Ketan Parekh, 2008(8)SCC 148, to drive home the point that in case, two or more laws having non-obstante clause operate in the same field, then(a) in such conflict in the provisions of law cases have to be decided in reference to the object and purpose of the laws under consideration; and(b) the other test would be that the later enactment must prevail over the earlier one.Further, the Court observed,”The protection of the interest of the child is the supreme and penultimate objective of the POCSO Act. Similarly, the Government enacted the Atrocity Act in 1989 to prevent atrocity and violence on the members of the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes meted out to them by the perpetrators other than the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes.”In the present case, the Court observed, the victim is a child below 18 years, who belongs to schedule caste.”The contentious issue which requires deliberation is whether the social status of the child will eclipse his or her wellbeing or safety. The answer is apparent. The caste of a child cannot override or prejudice the security and wellbeing of a child”, the Court stated. (emphasis supplied)In this context, the Court remarked,”Thus, a bare glance on the laudable objects of the POCSO Act will illuminate its supremacy on the Atrocity Act, though both the Acts can be termed as Special Acts. Hence, in case both the Special Acts are armed with non-obstante clauses, but the one which has the dominant feature of having supremacy in object and purpose of the laws for which it was enacted, the same will prevail over the other Act irrespective of the date of its promulgation. In such circumstances, the principle of “later Act shall prevail” will cease to apply.” (emphasis supplied)Lastly, the Court observed that in the present application, the applicant accused had approached the Court of Additional Sessions Judge & Special POCSO Judge & Special Atrocity Judge by filing Criminal Misc. Application No.272 of 2020 under section 439 of the Cr.P.C, which resulted into rejection.The applicant thereafter filed the present application seeking bail by invoking the provisions of section 439 of the Cr.P.C.The Court noted,”The powers of granting bail by the High Court under section 439 of the Cr.P.C. will not get diluted even after the special court has exercised such powers. Once it is established that the POCSO Act will have an overriding effect on the Atrocity Act, the provisions of section 31 of the POCSO Act will come into play which speaks of applicability of the provisions of Cr.P.C.”Consequently, the registry was directed to register the bail application under the provisions of section 439 of the Cr.P.C. in case, the same is filed pertaining to the offences registered under both — the POCSO Act and the Atrocity Act.Click Here To Download Order[Read Order]Next Storylast_img read more

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Personnel Today Awards 2001 update

first_imgPersonnel Today Awards 2001 updateOn 4 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Shortlisted teams for the MicrosoftGreat Plains Award for Excellence in HR Through TechnologyThisaward is aimed at HR teams who have seized the opportunities offered bysoftware and Internet solutions to deliver tangible benefits to theirorganisations.  The judge will look forevidence of technology’s full impact in meeting strategic objectivesLloydsTSBCentre for Career Management Whatthe team didLloydsTSB launched its Centre for Career Management in February 2000 to provide allemployees with information and guidance on their careers with the company. Itincludes a website on the corporate intranet and the University for LearningTSB website, which has a range of careers information and self-assessmenttools. The centre also provides advice on careers and learning opportunitiesthrough the HR call centre and gives access to coaches who offer careers adviceon a one-to-one basis.RobBriggs, senior manager of the Centre for Career Management, says the intranetplays a fundamental role in employees’ career development. It gives staffinformation on vacancies in the various business units in the group andincorporates learning maps that outline the knowledge, skills and competenciesrequired for each role.Whythey did itAstaff survey showed in 1999 that 65 per cent of employees were unhappy with theinformation available to them to help them manage their careers in Lloyds TSBand 75 per cent were dissatisfied with career opportunities within the group.”Over the last 10 years the organisation had been telling its employees itwas their responsibility to manage their careers but there was no constructivesupport to enable them to do that. There was a perception that there was a lackof career opportunities but in reality there were more since the merger thanever before,” says Briggs.Benefitsand achievementsTheCentre for Career Management is available to all Lloyds TSB’s 60,000 employeesand is one of the most visited sites on the corporate intranet with more than200,000 hits since it was launched. The centre has been responsible for a25-point increase in satisfaction among employees with career developmentopportunities at Lloyds TSB, according to staff attitude surveys. The centrehas helped reduce turnover rates of employees with less than one year’sservice, increase the proportion of women in senior management from 11.7 percent to 14.4 per cent and boost the proportion of ethnic minorities in seniormanagement from 0.7 per cent to 1 per cent.TheteamNumberin team 4 Staff responsible for 1,100 in HR department, 60,000employees nationallySenior manager, Centre for Career Management Rob BriggsCareer management consultant Sheila BoothCareer management consultant Angie CharlesHead of career management Jacey GrahamCareer management consultant Geoff PalinICLDelivering Through e-HRWhatthe team didITsolutions company ICL has developed its intranet to enable employees to benefitfrom e-learning, allow them to adjust their HR records and make choices on benefits.One of the most important sites on the intranet is the Learning Gateway, adatabase with more than 5,000 learning options incorporating online, CD Rom,classroom courses, books and videos. In addition there is a community homepagewhich links to a range of material including management development, personalprofiling and online libraries.ICLhas also developed a Personal Choices site, which enables employees to choosetheir benefits online. The site also allows ICL employees to organise travel servicesand health club membership at preferential rates. ICL’s most recent e-HRdevelopment is its Self-Service portal, which enables employees to view andmake adjustments to their HR records, including updating personal informationand ordering equipment such as IT software and mobile phones. Group employmentmanager Deirdre Murphy expects 35 per cent of ICL’s employees to be mobileworkers by 2002 and she says the intranet would enable all staff to accessinformation and e-learning so they can work effectively either from home orremotely.Whythey did itICLbelieves that in order to compete effectively it needs to allow its employeesto make full use of the opportunities technology affords. “It was part ofour e-ICL programme. We provided a portal for our suppliers and customers. Weused that same philosophy in terms of our employees,” Murphy explains.”We are in e-business and we want to make sure we reflect that in the waywe operate as company.”Benefitsand achievementsIntranetdevelopments have allowed ICL to improve the efficiency of administration andallows the HR function to concentrate on supporting managers and employees tomeet the needs of the business and employees. “Our employees like the factthey can access information directly as well as the ease of use. It hasprovided costs savings as well as benefits in terms of speed. Streamlining thebusiness has proved a major benefit,” Murphy adds.TheteamNumberin team 180 in departmentStaff responsible for 11,000 nationallyInternational communications manager Vanessa BrewerPeople development coordinator Carole HoughtonTeam administrator Daljeet PallInternational communications assistant Robert StephensonGroup employment manager Deirdre MurphyBritannicMoneyMaximising Workforce EngagementWhatthe team didBritannicMoney has worked with Ceridian HR to introduce an e-HR system that is cost andtime effective, requires minimum in-house IT support and reduces theadministrative burden on HR and payroll. The new system has helped the BritannicMoney HR team and managers slash the amount of time spent on recruitment andflexible benefits administration as well as monitor staff training. HRdirector Anne Ridge explains, “We have streamlined our recruitment processsignificantly. We can turn things around much more quickly for our applicantsand save time for our staff.”Ridgesays the system enables Britannic Money to improve the way it administers itsflexible benefits package, reducing both administration time and cost. Itallows HR administrators and payroll staff to change staff benefits on-line,such as family private health insurance, travel insurance, retail vouchers andpensions. Line managers and employees will soon be able to benefit from aself-service facility on the intranet, which will allow them to input absenceand overtime data, amend personal details and book training courses.Whythey did itAswell as the obvious business benefits provided by the new e-HR approach, Ridgesays it also frees up the HR team to add value to the company. “It hashelped our HR people to add value to their own careers and the business ratherthan spending time inputting information,” she says.Benefitsand achievementsQuickerrecruitment administration has helped Britannic Money’s recruitment drive toemploy more than 100 additional staff during 2001. It has also cut thepreviously high cost of external administration of flexible benefits for newmembers of staff to no cost and has given directors and managers access toreal-time management information. The system allows the HR team to record,monitor and evaluate staff training to enable Britannic Money to help itacquire a banking licence – one of its key corporate objectives for 2001.TheteamNumberin team 7 in project team, 10 in HR teamStaff responsible for 440Head of human resources Sharon DouglasCompensation and benefits manager Julie QuickHR adviser Sarah KesnerHR director Anne RidgeJudge’scommentJohn Cooper, European managing director,Concours GroupLloydsTSB “Thebefore and after measures for career management and opportunities demonstratedthe value of the investment. It is very much an employee-centric solution thatdelivers immediate benefits to the business.”BritannicMoney”Aninnovative approach and successful implementation through close team workingwith the external supplier. It delivered measurable financial benefits in termsof reduced costs in both HR management and IT delivery.”ICL”Caf‚VIK and the supporting e-HR programmes go past HR productivity to employeeproductivity by providing access to knowledge. It also recognised thatknowledge workers value being part of a community and provided a means ofachieving this in a virtual way for a distributed workforce.” Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Comment on Agency recruitment is not dying. It’s growing! by Steve Sykora

first_img Very much looking forward to that blog Greg!! Couldn’t agree more!Read full article Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Comment on Agency recruitment is not dying. It’s growing! by Steve SykoraShared from missc on 14 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img

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A year long comparison of GPS TEC and global ionosphere-thermosphere models

first_imgThe prevalence of GPS total electron content (TEC) observations has provided an opportunity for extensive global ionosphere‐thermosphere model validation efforts. This study presents a year‐long data‐model comparison using the Global Ionosphere‐Thermosphere Model (GITM) and the Thermosphere‐Ionosphere‐Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE‐GCM). For the entire year of 2010, each model was run and compared to GPS TEC observations. The results were binned according to season, latitude, local time, and magnetic local time. GITM was found to overestimate the TEC everywhere, except on the midlatitude nightside, due to high O/N2 ratios. TIE‐GCM produced much less TEC and had lower O/N2 ratios and neutral wind speeds. Seasonal and regional biases in the models are discussed along with ideas for model improvements and further validation efforts.last_img read more

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