A year long comparison of GPS TEC and global ionosphere-thermosphere models

first_imgThe prevalence of GPS total electron content (TEC) observations has provided an opportunity for extensive global ionosphere‐thermosphere model validation efforts. This study presents a year‐long data‐model comparison using the Global Ionosphere‐Thermosphere Model (GITM) and the Thermosphere‐Ionosphere‐Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE‐GCM). For the entire year of 2010, each model was run and compared to GPS TEC observations. The results were binned according to season, latitude, local time, and magnetic local time. GITM was found to overestimate the TEC everywhere, except on the midlatitude nightside, due to high O/N2 ratios. TIE‐GCM produced much less TEC and had lower O/N2 ratios and neutral wind speeds. Seasonal and regional biases in the models are discussed along with ideas for model improvements and further validation efforts.last_img read more

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Multi-tracer study of gas trapping in an East Antarctic ice core

first_imgWe study a firn and ice core drilled at the new “Lock-In” site in East Antarctica, located 136 km away from Concordia station towards Durmont d’Urville. High resolution chemical and physical measurements were performed on the core, with a particular focus on the trapping zone of the firn where air bubbles are formed. We measured the air content in the ice, closed and open porous volumes in the firn, firn density, firn liquid conductivity and major ion concentrations, as well as methane concentrations in the ice. The closed and open porosity volumes of firn samples were obtained by the two independent methods of pycnometry and tomography, that yield similar results. The measured increase of the closed porosity with density is used to estimate the air content trapped in the ice with the aid of a simple gas trapping model. Results show a discrepancy, with the model trapping too much air. Experimental errors have been considered but do not explain the discrepancy between the model and the observations. The model and data can be reconciled with the introduction of a reduced compression of the closed porosity compared to the open porosity. Yet, it is not clear if this limited compression of closed pores is the actual mechanism responsible for the low amount of air in the ice. High resolution density measurements reveal the presence of a strong layering, manifesting itself as centimeter scale variations. Despite this heterogeneous stratification, all layers, including the ones that are especially dense or less dense compared to their surroundings, display similar pore morphology and closed porosity as function of density. This implies that all layers close in a similar way, even though some close in advance or later compared to the bulk firn. Investigation of the chemistry data suggests that in the trapping zone, the observed stratification is partly related to the presence of chemical impurities.last_img read more

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Oxford researchers accurately trace Covid-19 transmission through genomic epidemiology

first_imgThe researchers drew on more than 50,000 virus genome sequences, in which 26,000 of these sequences were obtained from the Covid-19 Genomics UK (COG-UK) consortium. The results of the study offer a crucial context to what is happening now in the current wave of the pandemic in the UK. The same team have hence incorporated the genomic factor in identifying the latest variant (termed B.1.1.7) that is currently growing at rapid rates throughout the country.  The study is based on data from the first wave of the pandemic in early 2020, when the virus was first introduced into the region, and has found that the highest number of transmission chains had been introduced from Spain at 33%, France at 29%, and Italy at 12%. Transmission chains of the virus from China, meanwhile, accounted for only 0.4% of imports.  In a news article published by Oxford University, Professor Oliver Pybus, co-lead author based at Oxford’s Department of Zoology and the Oxford Martin School, said that by reconstructing where and when COVID-19 was introduced to the UK, we can see that earlier travel and quarantine interventions could have helped to reduce the acceleration and intensity of the UK’s first wave of cases.  Another co-lead author, Louis du Plessis, also from Oxford’s Department of Zoology, added that the UK shares large volumes of virus genetic data publicly on a weekly basis, and that “if you don’t have this level of surveillance, you won’t know the real situation of virus evolution and transmission.”  Researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh have recently published a comprehensive genomic analysis of the Covid-19 transmission. The full report was released on 8 January 2021, presenting detailed insights into the behaviour of Covid-19 transmission chains since the outbreak of the pandemic in the UK. center_img The team of scientists have suggested that a detailed comparison of the new variant’s behaviour with that of the first wave lineages will be crucial to understanding why the B.1.1.7 variant is spreading so quickly now. Before the March 2020 lockdown, high travel volumes and lax restrictions on international travel led to the circulation of more than 1,000 identifiable UK transmission lineages which had persisted into the summer of the same year.  Image Credit: iSO-FORM LLC. Licence: CC BY 4.0 PhD researcher Verity Hill also emphasised that this form of continuous, nationally coordinated genomic sequencing allows for high-resolution analysis and for other countries to place their genomic data into context. This would enable countries to strategise a more effective pandemic response.last_img read more

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TORRELLA, FRANK ALBERT, SR.

first_img80, a lifelong resident of Bayonne, passed away peacefully at Bayonne Medical Center surrounded by his family on November 19, 2017. Frank was the owner/operator of Bayonne Roofing, a company he founded in 1957 and he served his country proudly in The US Army during the Korean Conflict. Frank was an avid member of The Freemasons Society, The Shriners and The Royal Order of Jesters. He was the husband to Dolores (nee: Scerbo), they were 4 days shy of their 60th wedding anniversary. Frank was the father to Denise Torrella-Kosakowski and her husband Kuzz, Charles “Chuckie” Torrella and his wife Ashley, Albert Torrella and his wife Karyn and to Julie Torrella. He was also the grandfather to Nichalos, Jesse, Danny, C.J., Michael, Alex, Vincent, Caitlyn & Juliana and great-grandfather to Sienna, Chloe & Chace. Frank was pre-deceased by his sister Rachel Torrella and his children Frankie A. Torrella Jr. and Wade Torrella and surviving him are his niece and nephew Jonathan & Trisha Tirella, his secretary for the last 21 years Cindy Whalen, his companion Petey the dog and a host of other family members and close friends. In lieu of any flowers the family requests that donations be made in Frank’s memory to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital with envelopes to be made available at the funeral home or with a link found on Frank’s obituary page at www.MigliaccioFuneralHome.com. Funeral arrangements by MIGLIACCIO Funeral Home, 851 Kennedy Blvd.last_img read more

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A Cloudy Start to Sunday…..

first_imgAn overcast start to Sunday morning will give way to partly Sunny skies later this morning. High temperatures expected to be right around 85 degrees with a 30% chance of a stray thunderstorm in the PM hours. Water temperatures are climbing up towards the mid-70’s and there is a nice breeze on the beach with about 1-2 foot wave heights. I hope everyone enjoys the last day of July and have a superb Sunday!last_img

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For love of the creepy, crawly

first_imgMore than 200 biologists who study the creepy, crawly world of insects, clams, snails, and other invertebrates are at Harvard this week, exchanging ideas and getting to know each other in the 2nd International Congress on Invertebrate Morphology.The biologists, who hail from about 20 countries, are participating in a four-day event ending Thursday (June 23) that is packed with technical presentations and discussions on invertebrate form, function, and development.Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Gonzalo Giribet, the incoming president of the International Society of Invertebrate Morphology, organized the event, which is hosted by Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH).Attendees will hear discussions of neurophylogeny, or the study of the nervous system and its use to determine how creatures are related to each other, developmental biology, the morphological evolution of arthropods, and invertebrates as parasites, among other topics.Giribet said attendees not only will share new findings and discuss scientific trends, but will also be able to examine special collections at the MCZ and at its Ernst Mayr Library. They’ll also examine the glass sea creatures, a lesser-known collection created in the 1800s by the artists who created the HMNH’s famed glass flowers, the Blaschkas.last_img read more

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WNY News Now Moving To Remote Production Following Positive COVID Test

first_imgWNY News Now’s Justin Gould anchoring our daily ‘News Now @Noon’ broadcast. File photo.App users, tap here to watch the video interview.JAMESTOWN – WNY News Now News Director Justin Gould says that he found out Thursday morning that he’s tested positive for COVID-19, less than 24 hours after being tested at Jones Memorial Hospital. The announcement came after his girlfriend, McKenzie, received a positive test Wednesday evening. Gould says he wanted to share his status with the community in an effort to provide transparency throughout the process, including the precautions that the he and the WNY News Now staff have taken to minimize the spread of the virus.Gould explains that his girlfriend started exhibiting symptoms of the virus over the weekend, which resulted in her getting tested. Gould, himself, started to experience symptoms earlier this week, which ranged from a “tickle” in the throat, to a temporary loss of taste as well as cold symptoms. “Both of us are doing well, minus general cold symptoms,” Gould told me Thursday. “A lot of people say what separates COVID from a cold can be loss of taste, without a stuffy nose. This morning I have a stuffy nose. Last night I didn’t have a stuffy nose, and it was within an hours time, my taste faded. I was busy working on my computer here, and then I went to eat dinner and I couldn’t taste anything, and at that point, I had a pretty good suspicion I was going to test positive.”Gould is the first person to be exclusively interviewed by WNY News Now after receiving a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. I asked him to guide us through the emotions that he and his girlfriend were experiencing after receiving the diagnosis.“It is upsetting. Very upsetting,” Gould said. “Last night, when my girlfriend learned she tested positive, we were both pretty upset, mainly because with PPE and precautions that we’ve taken, we like many other people, are out in the community. And we’re very concerned for the loved ones that we’re in contact with. It’s not so much we are concerned for us because we are young and healthy and, thank God, right now our symptoms are mild, but our concerns were for other people.”The News Director says that he began the transition of working from home Tuesday afternoon in preparation of a positive test for himself, as well as his girlfriend. Gould additionally details how he worked remotely from home that evening as WNY News Now provided live coverage of the 2020 Chautauqua County election night.Gould explains that his contagious period is considered to have begun on Monday, according to information that he’s received from contract tracers.At the start of the pandemic, WNY News Now implemented sanitation, social distancing and other CDC guidelines for the staff when working for the company, whether it’d be in or out of the newsroom.Gould did wear extra PPE Monday and Tuesday as he transitioned to working from home.“As essential workers, we still go into work, but I’m still very much afraid for you guys, (others who work in the newsroom) all of you, because I don’t want us to have bad side effects of it,” Gould said. “And it’s not even so much I think about us, but I think about the people that we’ve come into contact with. That’s what was going through my mind.”A journalist who is writing a story very rarely uses the words “I” or “Me” in their articles, simply because the story is not about the writer. In this case, the story really isn’t about Gould or myself.I am making an exception in this case, though. I want to inform those who’ve watched the interview and who’ve read the article that I am also quarantining myself effective last night, other than working in any essential capacity, pending a negative test. I will be tested through my other place of employment Thursday afternoon, with the results expected by Friday evening.As of publish time, I am awaiting an expected call from a contact tracer. The rest of our staff will also be working from home for the time being as a precaution.The video above contains the full 22-minute Zoom interview with myself and Gould. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Lara Denning & More Will Join West End’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

first_img Additionally, current cast members Ross Dawes and Derek Hagen will take over in the roles of Mr. Salt and Mr. Bucket, respectively. Also joining the cast on May 4 is Mark Oxtoby as Jerry. View Comments Some new faces are about to visit Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. On May 4, the West End production of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory will welcome Lara Denning as Mrs. Buckett and Kraig Thornber as Grandpa George. They take over for Kirsty Malpass and Billy Boyle, respectively, and join the previously announced Jonathan Slinger, who will assume the role of the whimsical candyman. The musical features a book by David Greig and music and lyrics by March Shaiman and Scott Wittman. Based on Roald Dahl’s 1964 children’s book, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory follows the adventures of young Charlie Bucket as he and four other children win golden tickets to visit the strange and eccentric world of Willy Wonka and his chocolate factory. The West End production officially opened on July 25, 2013, starring Tony and Olivier Award winner Douglas Hodge as Willy Wonka. Denning previously appeared on the West End stage in Matilda. Thornber’s London credits include Return to the Forbidden Planet, Guys and Dolls and Oh! What a Lovely War.last_img read more

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The Photo – November 2013

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York STANDING UNITED: Long Beach residents form a human chain of hands in remembrance to mark the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, which devastated much of the City by the Sea. (Joe Abate/Long Island Press)last_img

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It’s all about the “fit” – get the absolute best out of employees!

first_imgIf you’re a sports fan like me, it’s interesting to see how players can struggle with one team, get traded to another, and all of a sudden blossom into a superstar. That process is especially maddening if a player started with your team and blossoms while playing for your rival! Often, the explanation for this occurrence is that he/she was a better “fit” with the new team.When thinking about it further, that player could’ve been a better fit with the new team’s coaching, system/style of play, or structure and discipline – in other words, they fit better with the culture. Additionally, the reference to fit could also apply to his/her new teammates or maybe a slight change in positioning – in other words, they fit better into a new role.Both of these issues – culture and role – are vital to your credit union’s ability to attract and retain the best talent … to produce your version of “superstars”!Before any long-term success can be attained, you need to do two things:Clearly define your desired culture. And be specific about the qualities you will demand in future employees who will perform within your culture.Identify the desired competencies for each role. Again, specificity is important but so is prioritization. Don’t create a list of 20 competencies; create a list of the most critical one or two.Consider the following retail examples and how they may apply to your organization:For their retail stores, Nike hires people who are passionate about sports. They may not be great athletes themselves, but they love sports, both as a player and fan. Are your employees passionate about working at the credit union and serving your members?Apple knows that most customers come into their stores with a tech problem – either their current tech isn’t working and/or they need new, better tech. As a result, the number one quality they look for in a retail associate is empathy. Your employees are tasked with solving member’s financial problems, too … is empathy the number one quality possessed by each employee?Regardless of the position, Disney says their candidates must immediately demonstrate friendliness in the interview process. If a candidate doesn’t freely and obviously smile, make eye contact, be genuinely warm, etc. they will not advance to a second interview (regardless of how much experience they have). Do your employees immediately and obviously demonstrate friendliness?Unlike other restaurants, Chick-fil-a does not look for previous experience in their recruiting process. In fact, they would prefer to hire someone who has never worked in fast-food before. They don’t want to break old habits; they want to shape new ones. How important is previous credit union or banking experience in your selection process?As each of these companies has done, your credit union should identify what’s most important to you and your culture. Then, once you’ve identified it, don’t waver from it – don’t give in to the temptation to hire someone who looks/sounds good but isn’t passionate or empathetic or obviously friendly. As an old boss used to tell me, “Your biggest fear will be an empty chair. But don’t make hiring decisions out of fear.” You only get one chance to fill that empty chair; make sure you do it right the first time by sticking to what you said is most important to your culture and organization.The retail examples above focus on the need for a strong culture fit; now let’s talk about the equally important need for position or role fit. In the sports analogy mentioned in the first paragraph, the new team wants to acquire a player who possesses the talents, skills, and competencies that are appropriate for the game plan they want to deploy – not what the other team(s) deploy. What game plan is your credit union looking to deploy?During a recent culture assessment with a client, we received the three following responses to survey questions:I enjoy the sales aspect of my job – 74% of member facing staff and 75% of branch managers could not agree with thisI enjoy the service aspect of my job – 89% of frontline staff agreed with thisI’m motivated by offering the right products and services to members – only 43% agreed with thisThink about the impact of this dynamic and how it would impact your credit union’s ability to execute your game plan. Largely, they have employees who do not like offering or selling products to members. Well, if their “game plan” is to become the PFI for their members, they have people who don’t fit. Conversely, if their game plan is be all about service, they may have the right people fit. At best, the wrong people-fit will restrict your ability to succeed; at worst, it will sabotage all other efforts to become top-of-wallet with your membership.There are various ways to address this issue of “fit” and there are multiple layers to it but here are four quick recommendations as you think about the culture you need to create for optimal success in 2021:Defining your culture fit and role fit is not something defined and executed by the HR exec only. This must be a collaborative process that is strategic in nature (especially the culture piece of it) and needs to be decided and supported by the entire executive/leadership team.When determining the role fit, be sure to recognize the various sales and service roles within your credit union and accept the fact that the primary talents, skills, and competencies are likely distinctly different for each role. (The top quality for a Call Center Rep is different than a Universal Banker, for instance.)Make the future process of recruiting and selection of talent a highly collaborative one. Yes, it is ultimately HR’s responsibility but everyone needs to play a role in making sure you get the right people for your culture and they get into the most appropriate roles.Referring back to the empty-chair metaphor above, be patient in your recruiting and selection process but also be proactive – seek out talent even when you don’t have an immediate need and when you do find the right fit, act swiftly to hire that person.It can be very challenging for most organizations to work through this process of defining your culture and role fits. Politics often get in the way; loud voices influence the final decision; execs can get distracted by chasing purple squirrels. If you need an outside, unbiased facilitator to keep you focused and lead you to a successful completion of this critical process, we can help. Please reach out to www.fi-strategies.com/contact-us. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Robert Paul Robert has been helping financial institutions drive their retail growth strategies for over 20 years. Paul is the Chief Executive Officer for FI Strategies, LLC, a private consulting company … Web: fi-strategies.com Detailslast_img read more

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