Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) 2009 Annual Report

first_imgGuaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2009 annual report.For more information about Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (GUARAN.ng)  2009 annual report.Company ProfileGuaranty Trust Bank Plc (GTBank) is a leading financial services institution in Nigeria with business operations in Cote D’Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, Sierra Leone, Tanzania and the United Kingdom. The company provides banking products and services for the retail, commercial and corporate banking sectors. GTBank has received numerous accolades in recognition of excellent service, delivery, innovation, corporate social responsibility and good corporate governance include ‘The Best Banking Group by World Finance Magazine’ and ‘The Most Innovative African Bank by The African Banker Magazine’ in 2016/2017. GTBank’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Guaranty Trust Bank is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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First Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw) 2019 Abridged Report

first_imgFirst Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2019 abridged results.For more information about First Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the First Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: First Capital Bank Limited (FCA.zw)  2019 abridged results.Company ProfileFirst Capital Bank Limited (formerly Barclays Bank of Zimbabwe) was founded in 1912 and is an iconic institution in the local banking sector; operating across the full spectrum of retail and business banking, and corporate and investment banking with 38 branches nationwide. In addition to mainstream financial products, First Capital Bank offers motor, home, travel, business and personal insurance services. After more than a century operating under its parent company, Barclays plc has sold its majority stake in Barclays Bank of Zimbabwe to FMB Capital Holdings, the Mauritius based holding company, that has banking operations in Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia. FMB Capital Holdings is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange. First Capital Bank Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Red House / JVA

first_img “COPY” Red House / JVASave this projectSaveRed House / JVA Houses Norway Save this picture!© Nils Petter Dale+ 28 Share CopyHouses•Oslo, Norway Projects Architects: JVA Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/120851/red-house-jva Clipboardcenter_img “COPY” Red House / JVA ArchDaily CopyAbout this officeJVAOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesOsloWoodHousesNorwayPublished on March 19, 2011Cite: “Red House / JVA” 19 Mar 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogFaucetshansgroheKitchen MixersGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Classic™ SeriesPlumbingSanifloMacerator – Saniaccess®3WoodBruagAcoustic Panels with LEDMetallicsSculptformClick-on Battens in Ivanhoe ApartmentsSkylightsVELUX CommercialLonglight 5-30° – Modular SkylightsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteLove TilesPorcelain Tiles – SplashAluminium CompositesMetawellAluminum Panels for Interior DesignMetal PanelsRHEINZINKPanel Systems – Horizontal PanelEducationalLamitechChalk boardCarpetsCarpet ConceptCarpet – Eco IquMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/120851/red-house-jva Clipboard Area:  170 m² Photographs Photographs:  Nils Petter DaleText description provided by the architects. The Red house is located in the western suburbs of Oslo. The site for the house is a former garden on the east bank of a heavily wooded river valley. The building is placed perpendicular to the stream, to heighten the dramatic potential of the setting and to avoid obstructing the view for the house beyond. Save this picture!© Nils Petter DaleRecommended ProductsWindowsFAKRORoof Windows – FPP-V preSelect MAXWindowsKalwall®Facades – Window ReplacementsWindowsSolarluxSliding Window – CeroWindowsJansenWindows – Janisol PrimoThe house is organized on two floors. Living spaces are on the top floor, oriented towards south and the view, with a culmination in a covered terrace among the trees to the west. Save this picture!© Nils Petter DaleThe lower floor houses the children’s bedrooms, facing the river valley to the north beneath the trees. This double orientation is the basis for the architectonic dynamic of the project, and the design is in all dimensions focused on enhancing this theme. The neighborhood is characterised by post war wooden single family houses, and this local character has inspired both the development of the spatial concept and the detailing. Save this picture!© Nils Petter DaleThe use of color reflects the temperament of the client.Project gallerySee allShow lessBalloon House Takes FlightArticlesDutch House / Rem KoolhaasArticles Sharelast_img read more

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Gia Lai House / Vo Trong Nghia Architects

first_img Houses Save this picture!© Hiroyuki Oki+ 21 Share “COPY” Gia Lai House / Vo Trong Nghia Architects Photographs Architects: VTN Architects Area Area of this architecture project Gia Lai House / Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsSave this projectSaveGia Lai House / Vo Trong Nghia Architects Photographs:  Hiroyuki OkiText description provided by the architects. This is an individual residence located in Gia Lai city, Middle Vietnam. The site is 7 m wide and 40 m deep, which is the typical conditions for ”Tube House” in Vietnam. As is often the case with “Tube House”, Housing Planning is strongly influenced only by the layout of “Rooms” and “Corridor” since too many bedrooms are required in a narrow site.Save this picture!© Hiroyuki OkiIn this case, we designed the corridor not as a simple and boring path but as a continuous and sequential space which becomes Living space, Dining space and also outside Living space, changing its width and height as people step into the house. Save this picture!plansFor the wall of this corridor, we stacked 4m-length granite stones made in Gia Lai city as a reflector of the various top-light. The louvers on the top light are simulated carefully to cut the direct sunlight. This top light and louver also save energy by keeping the natural ventilation for this house.Save this picture!© Hiroyuki OkiProject gallerySee allShow lessSCI-Arc’s Ball-Nogues Studio Installation + 2×8: Taut ExhibitionsArticlesReSpace Design CompetitionArticles Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/239502/gia-lai-house-vo-trong-nghia-architects Clipboard Projectscenter_img 2011 “COPY” Area:  510 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/239502/gia-lai-house-vo-trong-nghia-architects Clipboard ArchDaily CopyHouses•Gia Lai, CopyAbout this officeVTN ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesDabasHousesGia Lai3D ModelingPublished on June 01, 2012Cite: “Gia Lai House / Vo Trong Nghia Architects” 01 Jun 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogShowershansgroheShower MixersVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Abrasion ResistantPartitionsSkyfoldIntegrating Operable Walls in a SpaceLightsVibiaLamps – NorthCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemSkylightsVELUX CommercialAtrium Longlight, DZNE GermanyHanging LampsLouis PoulsenLamp – PH ArtichokeTiles / Mosaic / GresiteHisbalitMosaic Tiles – TexturasAcousticMetawellAluminum Panels – Acoustic SailsMineral / Organic PaintsKEIMTiO2-free Mineral Paint – Soldalit®-ArteWall / Ceiling LightsA-LightWall Grazer Concealed LightsDoorsBuster and PunchDoor Hardware – Pull BarMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?嘉莱住宅 / Vo Trong Nghia Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Year: last_img read more

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Consortium announced to manage Futurebuilders fund

first_img Advertisement  19 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 7 January 2004 | News Consortium announced to manage Futurebuilders fund The group of charities that will manage the £125 million Futurebuilders fund to develop the voluntary sector’s infrastructure has been announced.The consortium will be lead by Charity Bank, NCVO and Unity Trust bank, with support from the Impetus Trust, the Community Fund and the Northern Rock Foundation. The details were announced by Paul Boateng, Chief Secretary to the Treasury. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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AngelShares launches new arts crowdfunding site

first_img  52 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AngelShares launches new arts crowdfunding site Howard Lake | 17 November 2011 | News AngelShares is a new philanthropic crowdfunding website for arts and cultural projects in the UK. Founded by Sarah Gee, a professional fundraiser and marketer for nearly 20 years, it aims to help the arts build stronger relationships with donors.Gee claims that it is “the only arts and cultural crowdfunding site that collects Gift Aid on donations”.Projects can be posted to the site by organisations or individual artists, and donors are then encouraged to invest to make the projects happen. In return donors receive exclusive benefits offered by the project owners. These are up to the project creator to choose: they could be opportunities for private visits to galleries or historic houses, meetings with creative artists, or other quirky gifts or acknowledgments of their support.Projects on the site at launch include collaborations with Turner Prize-winning artist Gillian Wearing, an appeal to save an art house cinema, and support for a craft collective of refugee and immigrant women.Projects can choose to set an income target by a timed deadline, or simply receive on-going donations.Gee said: “As a fundraiser, I had become fascinatedby the range of opportunities for building relationships through online giving. I could see that most of the existing crowdfunding sites were not maximizing tax efficient giving, so set out to create a site that would provide as much money as possible to support arts and cultural projects, but also build deep and long-lasting relationships with donors.“HM Government is encouraging philanthropy in the arts, and our aim is that AngelShares will help create a band of angels who are new philanthropists and help make art happen.”Interview with Sarah Gee of AngelSharesUK Fundraising’s Howard Lake met Sarah Gee a month or so before launch to find out about the service.www.angelshares.com AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Advertisement Tagged with: arts crowdfunding Digital Gift Aid About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Militias threaten journalists covering protests in Iraq

first_img Organisation Help by sharing this information Media outlets have not been spared either. Gunmen attacked and ransacked at least three Baghdad TV channels during the first week of the protests. The harassment is such that many journalists have opted to stop working. RSF has been told that many have left Baghdad or even Iraq altogether. Journalists covering a seven-week-old wave of protests in Iraq have repeatedly been threatened by local militias to get them stop their reporting. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the growing threats to Iraqi journalists and calls on the authorities to provide them with better protection. IraqMiddle East – North Africa Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists Armed conflicts Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” “In this climate of growing violence, which is targeting the media in particular, the Iraqi authorities are failing to fulfil their role and duty to protect journalists,” said Sabrina Bennoui, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “Everything must be done to prevent more serious violations of this kind. Journalists are already struggling to provide coverage and, if the state does nothing, they could be reduced to silence as in the worst dictatorships.” News February 15, 2021 Find out more Writer and citizen-journalist Amjed Al-Dahamat was gunned down by an unidentified armed group in the southeastern province of Maysan on 7 November after repeatedly being threatened for weeks. News December 16, 2020 Find out more December 28, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Iraq RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Muhammad Al-Shamari, a member of the Iraqi Observatory for Press Freedoms (which is linked to the national journalists’ union), was kidnapped near his home on 17 November and remained missing until released 24 hours later. He had often posted information on Facebook about the crackdown on the protests and had received threats from many quarters. No information about the circumstances of his abduction or release has emerged. Receive email alerts News News According to the Press Freedom Advocacy Association, 33 journalists have been threatened by members of unidentified militias since the protests began on 1 October. The figure is all the more alarming because the threats are increasingly being followed up by acts of violence. RSF_en to go further November 22, 2019 Militias threaten journalists covering protests in Iraq Aside from their armed wings, these various sources of influence have armies of anonymous online social network accounts, some of which have been sharing a blacklist of journalists said to work “for Israel and the United States.” Dozens of these accounts, now using an “Agents of the Joker” hashtag to allude to the United States, are currently circulating photos of journalists – identified as enemies and dressed like clowns against the backdrop of a US flag – like wanted notices.Iraq is ranked 156th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. IraqMiddle East – North Africa Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists Armed conflicts Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan For years, Iraq has had around 60 militias linked to religious groups, political parties or foreign governments that operate in parallel to the regular forces and often escape government control. Their existence makes it hard to identify who is responsible for threats. Taking advantage of the chaos accompanying the current protests, these groups are targeting reporters who film the unrest, especially live rounds being fired at protesters.last_img read more

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Harassment, exile, imprisonmentOne hundred independent journalists face the State

first_imgReports IntroductionState control of published or broadcast information has not slackened in Cuba. At a time when their potential audiences are increasing owing to the Internet, about one hundred independent journalists, considered by the authorities to be “counter-revolutionaries”, are one of the main targets of repression.Since 1997 five of them have been sentenced to between six months’ and six years’ imprisonment, and over one hundred arrests and cases of questioning have been reported. These journalists are frequently victims of accusations, attacks, seizure of equipment, house arrests, pressure on families, friends or contacts, and attempts to discredit or divide them.The relative respite from harassment of all “opponents” after the Pope’s January 1998 visit lasted no more than a year. Attempts by several heads of state or government (at the Ibero-American Summit in November 1999 in Havana) to get the Cuban government to democratize the regime were fruitless. Freedom of expression, of the press and of association are still not established in Cuba .Yet, despite the difficult conditions in which they work and the large numbers in voluntary or forced exile, the ranks of independent journalists continue to swell. According to the information collected by Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF), there are currently just over one hundred independent journalists in Cuba, as opposed to a handful in the early 1990s. Formerly with the official media (from which they resigned or were dismissed), the communication sector (editors, translators, archivists, librarians, etc.), the education world or simply technicians, they now work in Havana and in the provinces where police harassment is more intense.Most independent journalists work for agencies. The first was founded in 1988 by Yndamiro Restano Díaz (Asociación de Periodistas Independientes de Cuba, which in 1992 became the Agencia de Prensa Independiente de Cuba, APIC, still active). Today there are 18 such agencies , four of which are based in the provinces, not counting those that disseminate news on behalf of social actors such as farmers, educators or independent unions. Some claim to have about ten people working for them, with correspondents in the provinces (e.g. Cuba Press, Cooperativa de Periodistas Independientes, Centro Norte del País), others have only two or three. About ten journalists work outside these agencies, primarily in the capital.The French journalist Martine Jacot, sent by RSF to Cuba from 10 to 17 August 2000, met a dozen independent journalists in Ciego de Ávila and Havana, as well as the families of two of the three journalists currently in prison. On 17 August, as she was about to return to France, she was arrested and questioned for one and a half hours at Havana airport by six members of the security police. A video camera, two videotapes and documents were seized. Despite repeated requests by RSF this equipment has not been returned to the organisation.Internet to the rescueWhether they are experienced professionals, trained by their peers or self-taught, the possibilities open to independent journalists have widened owing to new technologies to which they themselves have no access. The creation in Western countries of Internet sites which host the news they transmit from Cuba (mostly by telephone or fax, when they have one) has widened the scope for dissemination of news that cannot be published in their own country. The number of their contributions (by telephone) to foreign radio stations, usually linked to exiles, has also increased.Deprived of direct access to official sources, expelled from government press conferences when they try to attend, they gather their information from all those who are dissatisfied in Cuba: opponents, human rights activists, civil servants (tired of noting that any negative news as regards the government, whether political, economic, social or environmental, is absent from the Cuban media), employees of foreign companies or the man in the street. Rationed for the past forty years, subjected to additional restrictions since 1991, the beginning of the “special peacetime period” after resources from the former Eastern Bloc dried up, the population is disgruntled about the increasing “dollarisation” of the Cuban economy in which it has no access itself to dollars.Facts such as the arrest of a Cuban opponent, a fit of ill humour by the population or an attempt to organise civil society, formerly unnoticed abroad, at least for some time, are now quickly relayed outside the country. Such information, as well as more global analyses, are heard in Cuba by those able to tune into foreign radio stations, especially Radio Martí (financed since 1982 by the US Congress to broadcast to the island). The jamming of such stations is often ineffective.New “gagging law”The Cuban authorities have a new legislative arsenal to gag these independent journalists and stop dissident activities. They were nevertheless reluctant to apply it when several European Union states made the improvement of the human rights situation in Cuba a condition, in the Lomé Convention, for increasing trade that the island sorely needs due to the US embargo.Promulgated in February 1999, the “88 Law” – soon nicknamed the “gagging law” in dissident circles – weighs like the Sword of Damocles over any person who “collaborates, by any means whatsoever, with radio or television programmes, magazines or any other foreign media” or “provides information” considered likely to serve US policy. The law provides for very heavy sentences: up to 20 years’ imprisonment, confiscation of all personal belongings and fines up to 100,000 pesos (close to 4,800 dollars, while the average Cuban salary is 250 pesos or 12 dollars per month). This law, that no court has taken advantage of as yet, also provides for punishment for “the promotion, organisation or encouragement of, or the participation in meetings or demonstrations”.”Independent journalists are mercenaries: the (US) Empire pays, organises, teaches, trains, arms and camouflages them, and orders them to shoot at their own people” commented the communist youth daily Juventud Rebelde after the law was passed. These were the words of Tubal Paez, president of the Cuban Journalists’ Union, an official organisation. To be allowed to practise, its 2,000 members had to undertake to be “loyal to the principles and values of the revolution and socialism”. In Cuba all the media are “state or social property”. The press (the dailies Granma, official communist party organ, and Jeventud Rebelde, the weekly Trabajadores of the official unions and the magazine Bohemia, in particular), the national and regional radio stations and the only two television channels in the country publish or broadcast articles and reports chosen, reviewed and amended to suite the government’s ideological interests. In early August 2000 a host of Radio Morón, a small station in central Cuba, was dismissed after reading over the air a poem by Raúl Rivero (founder and director of the agency Cuba Press).These media devote a large part of their meagre columns or limited broadcasting time (six hours per channel per day during the week and fifteen hours per day over week-ends) to speeches by President Fidel Castro and official propaganda. The population has no access to other sources of information, except for insufficiently jammed foreign radio stations.Three journalists jailedThe five independent journalists who were tried and sentenced to jail since 1997 were not clearly charged for disclosing information without authorisation, but for other offences. Three are still behind bars. All are considered by Amnesty International to be prisoners of opinion.Bernardo Arévalo Padrón: beaten up and in unauthorised exile35-year-old Bernardo Arévalo, founder of the news agency Linea Sur in October 1996 in Aguada de Pasajeros (a town 140 km south-east of Havana, in Cienfuegos province) was arrested on 18 November 1997. He was sentenced by the appeal court on 28 November to six years’ imprisonment for “insulting” President Fidel Castro and Vice-president Carlos Lage, by virtue of Article 144 of the Cuban penal code. This former railway worker had said on a foreign radio station that two Cuban leaders were “liars”, after accusing them of not meeting democratic commitments made during a Ibero-American Summit.In an open letter addressed to the Cuban head of state on 19 December 1998, the prisoner wrote: “I consider that my sentence of six years in jail is unjust and excessive, for in no other civilised country is someone who calls the head of state a ‘liar’ sentenced “. Stressing his “admiration” for Fidel Castro’s “struggle against the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista” in the 1950s, Bernardo Arévalo Padrón recalled that Fidel Castro himself had benefited from an amnesty when he was a political prisoner. “As for me, I decided in late 1988 to peacefully oppose your ideas”, continued the prisoner, who has asked (in vain as of yet) to be allowed to go to Spain, a country whose authorities have reportedly granted him a visa.In the Ariza high-security prison where he was initially jailed the journalist was beaten up on 23 April 1998 by two security police who accused him of handing out leaflets in the prison corridors. Injured in the head and subject to memory loss since that attack, he was subsequently put in a “punishment cell for his own safety because he could still be attacked or even killed by common law prisoners”, explained the prison authorities to his wife Libertad.On 15 May 1999 he was transferred to the “labour camp number 16”, close to Ariza prison. The journalist, a catholic deprived of religious assistance, is regularly threatened by his warden (also responsible for his “rehabilitation”) with transferral back to Ariza. He is accused of not filling his “quotas” of work allocated to him, consisting of weeding or cutting sugar cane. His wife has been allowed to take him tools to sharpen his machete because the camp does not have any. Since May 2000 he is allowed one family visit every three weeks and a “matrimonial” visit once a month (a night with his wife in the camp, in a room with bamboo walls in which there is no privacy). He is not allowed to see or enter into contact with his friends. In terms of Cuban law he should be allowed to visit his family every three weeks, especially his aged and ailing mother.To one of the numerous petitions by RSF for his release, the Cuban foreign affairs minister Felipe Pérez Roque replied on 17 April 2000 that Bernardo Arévalo “was working since 1991 with counter-revolutionary groups with the intention of committing violent acts, even if he was sentenced for insults”.Jesús Joel Díaz Hernández : a trial for “social dangerousness” as an exampleFor Odencio Diaz, the father of this 26-year-old journalist, the most unbearable thing is the “feeling of powerlessness faced with courts that fabricate ungrounded accusations and refuse to hear witnesses”. This former member of the communist party is convinced that his son was jailed to prevent him from sending articles abroad, first from the Pátria agency for which he worked since 1995, then from the Cooperativa avileña de periodistas independientes (CAPI) that he founded in December 1998 in Ciego de Ávila, 300 km east of Havana. He was arrested on 18 January 1999 at 6 a.m. at the family home in Morón, and accused of being “socially dangerous”. Article 73 of the Cuban penal code thus describes anyone “who regularly contravenes the rules of social life by acts of violence (…), disturbs the public order, lives as a social parasite, exploits others’ work or practices socially reprehensible vices”.During the trial on the day after his arrest, Jesús Joel Díaz Hernández was accused of no longer working for the state since 1996 (the year in which, those close to him affirm, he was dismissed from his job at the National Institute for Hydraulic Resources in Morón because he had been a human rights activist since 1993). He was also charged with “sometimes consuming alcoholic drinks which made him aggressive and caused him to provoke those around him” and for having “listened to loud music”. His lawyer’s plea was soon interrupted by the presiding judge and no witness for the defence was asked to give evidence during the public hearing which lasted several hours. The accused was sentenced to “four years’ deprival of liberty in a study or work centre with internment”. Since then he has been detained in Canaleta jail, near Morón, since Ciego de Ávila province does not have such centres, according to the prison authorities.As soon as the sentence was pronounced the prisoner lodged an appeal and went on a hunger strike which caused him to be put into solitary confinement. On 22 January 1999 when his family visited him they learned that the first hearing of an appeal case was under way. The family’s lawyer had not been advised and had been replaced by one appointed by the court. On 27 January the prisoner was informed in his cell that his appeal had been dismissed. His family then applied for the case to be revised and in early February produced written testimonies from five neighbours. These persons swore (in front of a lawyer) that Joel had never, to their knowledge, abused alcohol nor caused any kind of trouble in public. They received no response from the authorities who even maintain that there never was any appeal against the initial sentence.Jesús Joel Díaz Hernández denounces the very bad conditions of his internment (with common law criminals). To eliminate the fleas, insects and rodents infesting the cells, he says, the prison authorities fumigate the prison without evacuating the prisoners. When the prisoners protest sedatives are administered. He also denounces the absence of medical assistance. In June 2000 his parents, recently allowed to visit him every three weeks, smuggled a urine sample out of the prison to have it analysed. Viral hepatitis was diagnosed by a laboratory in the region and only then was he given adequate treatment, even though he had been suffering from high fever for a while.”Joel Díaz is a common law delinquent who associated with anti-social elements involved in drug trafficking, procuring, smuggling and livestock theft”, wrote the Cuban foreign affairs minister Felipe Pérez Roque on 17 April 2000. None of these charges is featured on the documents given to the prisoner.Joel Diaz and his family believe that through this “expeditious” trial and the heavy sentence, the authorities wanted to strike quickly and “make an example of him”, in order to dissuade local youths from becoming or continuing their work as independent journalists.Manuel Antonio González Castellanos : from provocation to the “graveyard of the living”Manuel Antonio González Castellanos, aged 43, is a professional journalist and correspondent for the agency Cuba Press in Holguín in eastern Cuba. On the evening of 1 October 1998 he was on his way home, where his mother, the daughter of Lidia Doce’s, the famous “messenger of the Che” during the revolution, also lives, when he was shouted at and insulted by an Interior ministry official and two state security agents. The journalist lost his temper and ended up holding Fidel Castro personally responsible for such incessant harassment.Manuel Antonio González Castellanos was immediately accused of “insulting” the president. His family was given no news of him and their telephone line was cut the next day, while outside the house an “act of repudiation” (a crowd of communist party members shouting insults and throwing stones) was going strong. Leornardo Varona González, the prisoner’s nephew and correspondent for the agency Santiago Press was also arrested for protesting against his uncle’s arrest by writing “Down with Fidel!” on the walls of the family house. On 6 May 1999 he was sentenced to 16 months in jail (he was released in January 2000) and his uncle to 31 months in jail.Two months after his trial Manuel Antonio González Castellanos was transferred to the Holguin high security prison “Cuba sí”, nicknamed the “graveyard of the living” because of the deplorable conditions of detention. He has since been suffering from respiratory problems which persist despite his transfer to another prison in the province. He was forced to sleep on the ground for several days.On 26 June 2000, protesting against the confiscation of his notes in his cell, the prisoner was severely beaten and put into solitary confinement for ten days. His family, constantly harassed, fear that his respiratory problems will degenerate into tuberculosis, a disease from which several prisoners in the same prison are suffering.In his case the Foreign affairs minister wrote on 17 April 2000 that he had been sentenced for having “caused serious disturbances to the public order”.Accused of “enemy propaganda”Other journalists released on parole are have still not been tried, in some cases after several years. Apart from “insulting” the President and “social dangerousness”, the charges most often made against them include:- illicit association: In 1995 most news agencies filed applications for the legalisation of their status by the Cuban Justice minister, in compliance with the constitution of the country. None of them have received a reply.-enemy propaganda or collaboration with the enemy: These offences, which existed before the 88 Law, are aimed at collaboration with US radio stations.- espionage: This offence is often referred to when journalists have made contact with the US interests Section in Havana, with a view to obtaining a visa.- spreading false news.Among the accused are 55-year-old José Edel Garcia Diaz, director of the agency Centro Norte del País (CNP) who is awaiting trial for five of these offences (“insulting the President”, “illicit association”, “collaboration with the enemy”, “spreading false news” and “espionage”) and Oswaldo de Céspedes, a former hospital assistant, now manager of the agency Cooperativa de periodistas independientes (CPI), who has been accused since 1995 of “illicit association” and “enemy propaganda”. They both wrote articles on “sensitive” subjects such as pollution, nuclear energy and the risks of radioactivity, and new epidemics.Second part CubaAmericas Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internet RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago September 2000 Follow the news on Cuba to go further Help by sharing this information September 1, 2000 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Harassment, exile, imprisonmentOne hundred independent journalists face the State News May 6, 2020 Find out more RSF_en New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council CubaAmericas Receive email alerts News News October 15, 2020 Find out more Organisation October 12, 2018 Find out morelast_img read more

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Indian reporter charged with defamation for exposing poor school meals

first_img News Organisation IndiaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms Freedom of expressionJudicial harassment Pawan Jaiswal released a video on the 2nd of September – here in screenshot – to explain his reasons for reporting on the issue after a local official contacted him (photo: Twitter). India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media RSF_en to go further News “We urge the Uttar Pradesh authorities, starting with First Minister Yogi Adityanath, to immediately drop these proceedings against Pawan Jaiswal, who just did his job as a journalist,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “This is clearly an attempt to intimidate a reporter who acted in the public interest. The ‘criminal conspiracy’ charge is a disgrace.” But the Uttar Pradesh authorities have not withdrawn the complaint against Jaiswal, which means he could be arrested at any time. IndiaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsOnline freedoms Freedom of expressionJudicial harassment February 23, 2021 Find out more September 3, 2019 Indian reporter charged with defamation for exposing poor school meals Follow the news on India Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is appalled by the complaint brought yesterday by the education ministry in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh against a journalist who filmed primary school students being fed a very inadequate midday meal. The complaint must be withdrawn at once, RSF said. Journalists demonstrated in support of Jaiswal in the city of Mirzapur this morning. Receive email alerts March 3, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Pawan Jaiswal, a reporter for the Hindi-language Jansandesh Times, is accused of “conspiracy to defame” the Uttar Pradesh government because he posted a video of children at a school in a rural part of Mirzapur district being fed nothing but roti (grilled flatbread) with salt for lunch. April 27, 2021 Find out more RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 News Indian journalist wrongly accused of “wantonly” inaccurate reporting News India is ranked 140th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. In a follow-up video yesterday, Jaiswal said a local official had told him about the inadequate school meals, and that he had notified the school’s authorities that he was coming to film. An official enquiry has confirmed the facts reported in the first video and, as a result, two members of the school’s staff have been fired. last_img read more

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‘Do They Have No Right To Express An Opinion?’ : Supreme Court Asks Petitioner Challenging State Assembly Resolutions On Central Laws To Do More Research

first_imgTop Stories’Do They Have No Right To Express An Opinion?’ : Supreme Court Asks Petitioner Challenging State Assembly Resolutions On Central Laws To Do More Research LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK18 March 2021 11:59 PMShare This – xThe Supreme Court on Friday adjourned a petition which challenges the competence of state legislative assemblies to pass resolutions about Parliamentary laws, by asking the petitioner’s lawyer to do more research.”You do more research. We don’t want to create more problems than solving”, the Chief Justice of India told Senior Advocate Soumya Chakraborty, who was representing the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court on Friday adjourned a petition which challenges the competence of state legislative assemblies to pass resolutions about Parliamentary laws, by asking the petitioner’s lawyer to do more research.”You do more research. We don’t want to create more problems than solving”, the Chief Justice of India told Senior Advocate Soumya Chakraborty, who was representing the petitioner.The petition was filed by a NGO called “Samta Andolan Samiti” challenging the practice of assemblies passing resolutions criticizing central laws such as CAA, farm laws etc.Senior Advocate Chakraborty submitted before the bench comprising CJI, Justices AS Bopanna and V Ramasubramaninan that the privileges of the legislators cannot be used to comment on matters which are beyond the jurisdiction of the legislature.”The immunity given to legislators under Article 194(2) are with regard to adherence to rules and procedure of legislative assembles. If they make a departure from rules of legislative procedure ,there is absolutely no immunity given to legislators”, the senior lawyer submitted.When the counsel cited the example of the resolution passed by the Kerala assembly against the Citizenship Amendment Act in December 2019, the CJI asked : “Why can’t such a resolution be passed?””This is the opinion of members of Kerala assembly. They have not told people to disobey the law. They have only requested the Parliament to abrogate the law. It is only an opinion expressed by the Kerala assembly, which has no force of law”, the CJI continued.In reply, the lawyer said that the assembly has no jurisdiction to comment about CAA. “We are with you if you say that Kerala Assembly has no jurisdiction to set aide the law made by the Parliament. But do they have no right to express an opinion?”, the CJI asked.Responding to this, Chakraborty argued that the rules of procedure of the assemblies barred such resolutions. The lawyer cited Rule 109 of the Kerala Assembly procedure which deals with admissibility of resolutions. According to this rule, a resolution should not relate to a matter which is primarily not the concern of the State, the lawyer said.”How can you say this is not a concern of the state?”, CJI asked.The counsel then referred to another clause of Rule 109 which state that a resolution should not relate to a matter which is pending adjudication in court. Since the Supreme Court was already seized of over 60 writ petitions challenging the CAA on the date of resolution, the Speaker of Kerala Assembly should not have allowed the presentation of the resolution, the lawyer argued.At this point, the bench asked the lawyer if there is any precedent interpreting the scope of such legislative rules.Chakraborty replied that there is no precedent as such; but he referred to the judgment authored by Justice PB Gajendragadkar in the Special Reference case reported in 1965(1) SCR 143. He said that the decision has interpreted the interplay between the fundamental right to free speech under Article 19(1)(a) and the legislative privileges under Article 194.At this point, the bench asked Chakraborty to do more research on the issue and adjourned the matter by four weeks.Next Storylast_img read more

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