Virgin London Marathon 2012 runners raise record £52.8m

Virgin London Marathon 2012 runners raise record £52.8m Tagged with: Events Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 14 September 2012 | News Runners in April’s Virgin London Marathon raised £52.8 million for good causes, bringing the total raised since the race began in 1981 to £610.7 million.This is the sixth consecutive year that London Marathon runners have broken the Guinness World Record for charity fundraising at a single annual event.This year’s run, which took place on 22 April 2012, featured a record 36,705 runners who finished the course. According to the organisers, 74% of them were raising money for good causes.Virgin London Marathon race director Hugh Brasher said: “This is an especially impressive total and the fact that this figure increased again for the sixth year in a row, despite the well publicised economic woes, shows just how committed our runners are to raising funds for good causes”.London Marathon fundraising totals2007 £46.5 million2008 £46.7 million2009 £47.2 million2010 £50.6 million2011 £51.8 million2012 £52.8 millionVirgin London Marathon 2013Next year’s Virgin London Marathon takes place on Sunday 21 April 2013. The official charities will be Age UK and YouthNet.www.runforit.org.ukPhoto: Pablo Gomez on Flickr.com Advertisement  37 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

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Garda appeal to mind your mental health

first_imgLinkedin Twitter Advertisement Print GARDAÍ in Limerick say they are increasingly encountering people with mental health difficulties and are appealing to people who find themselves in that situation to look for help.Garda John Finnerty told the Limerick Post that given the unprecedented times people were going through, local Gardaí wanted to stress how important it was for them to maintain their mental wellbeingSign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “This is a difficult time for everybody but if you already suffer from anxiety or depression, you will be challenged even more. Given the nature of the work of An Garda Siochana we’re encountering increased incidents where mental health is a primary factor.“If you need help,  help is available,” he added.“I particularly want to mention the website yourmentalhealth.ie which is operated collectively by the HSE, Healthy Ireland and the Samaritans. The information is very simple,  easy to follow and very relevant.”“ALONE  is an excellent service for the older person, their number is 0818-222024, the Samaritans number is 116 123 and Pieta House is 1800 247247. Finally, the Limerick community response number is 1800-832 005 and they can assist callers with any and all information they might need,” Garda Finnerty explained.The HSE reminds people in difficulty that they should contact their family doctor for immediate support or to get a referral to the mental health services.Mental health help is also available through the emergency department at the University Hospital Limerick in Dooradoyle for any person who is in crisis, having suicidal thoughts or likely to self-harm. Emailcenter_img Facebook Previous article€6.5bn business support package must be reallocated or SME’s will become the nursing homes of the economyNext articlePost Punk and PPE: New music from Sons of Southern Ulster Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. WhatsApp NewsHealthGarda appeal to mind your mental healthBy Bernie English – June 11, 2020 371 last_img read more

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Origins of the Swiss Army Knife

first_imgA red handle, a small white cross, a blade or two, and fold-out tools for the job— a Swiss Army Knife is an icon of utility and smart design recognizable the world over. Invented in the 1880s, and today still made exclusively in only two factories in Switzerland, the pocket knives are produced in dozens of varieties at a tune of more than 15 million per year.This summer, on a trip to Europe, I toured Swiss Army Knife factories in Ibach and Delemont, the idyll Swiss towns where pocket knives have been made for more than 100 years. Amid the pounding of machines and the bins of knife implements on the factory floor, workers assembled knife after knife to meet the world’s demand.It was in Ibach, in 1884, where Karl Elsener and his mother, Victoria, opened a cutlery cooperative that would soon produce the first knives sold to the Swiss Army. The original model, called the Soldier Knife, was made for troops who needed a foldable tool that could open canned food and aid in disassembling a rifle. The Soldier Knife included a blade, a reamer, a can opener, a screwdriver, and oak handles.Today, similar simple pocket knives roll continuously off the line at Victorinox A.G., the company that grew out of Elsener’s small cooperative decades back. Blades, corkscrews, files, punches, can openers, scissors, saws, and tiny toothpicks are long-time features.Other Victorinox knives include 21st-century touches like laser pointers, USB storage drives, and fingerprint scanners with data encryption built in. All the implements, from blades to data drives, are foldable or set on springs to disappear when not in use.In Switzerland, I traveled by train from city to city. Across the country, in the French-speaking region of Jura, I toured Wenger S.A., the other half of the Swiss Army coin.The Delemont company, founded as a cutler in the 19th century and later modernized by businessman Theodore Wenger, shares the Swiss Army knife trademark with Victorinox. Both companies’ knives have a similar history, and both have been purchased in bulk quantities by the Swiss Army since the 1890s.Like Victorinox, the Wenger Swiss Army Knives come in dozens of types. The company sells simple pocket knives on up to multitools like the Mike Horn Knife, a half-pound beast with two blades and a pliers. Its EvoGrip line has added ergonomic contours to knife handles. In 2006, Wenger introduced the Giant, a gargantuan, nine-inch-wide “pocket knife” with 85 implements that sells as a collector’s item for $1,400.Wenger and Victorinox are distinct companies. But both are owned by the Elsener family, with the great-grandchildren of Karl Elsener still overseeing production and managing a business that employs thousands of Swiss workers.In Ibach, after a tour of a factory where up to 28,000 Swiss Army Knives are made every day, I sat down with Charles Elsener, one of the great-grandchildren of the company’s founder. He pulled a couple knives from his pocket and started snapping blades and implements out for show.Charles Elsener talked about the hidden springs on which the blades and screwdrivers snap open and closed. It was a type of this spring mechanism, invented in the original Ibach cutlery, that made Swiss Army Knives stand out 100 years back.At my meeting this summer, Charles Elsener spoke about new implements, test products, and the science of metallurgy for making a perfect blade. From the factory below, I could hear the machines beat. It’s been 126 years in Ibach. The Swiss Army Knife machine continues to crank on.—Stephen Regenold is founder and editor of www.gearjunkie.com.last_img read more

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