Greensky Bluegrass Kicks Off D.C. Run, Invites Fruition Members For Wood Brothers Cover [Setlist/Watch]

first_imgLast night, Greensky Bluegrass hit Washington, DC for the first of their three nights at the 9:30 Club with friends Fruition. Greensky certainly rose to the occasion, putting together a solid show that inevitably will get fans stoked for the next two nights. In honor of Groundhog’s Day and in keeping with tradition, the band opened with “Groundhog.”Moving into the second set, the band was fired up, busting out “Cold Feet” to kick things off after set break for a stacked second set. After “Can’t Stop Now,” which featured quotes from Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream Speech,” the band began a cover of The Wood Brother’s “Luckiest Man.”  For this track, Mimi Naja and Jay Cobb Anderson of supporting band Fruition joined Greensky. Following this sit-in, Greensky busted out “Freeborn Man,” during which Michael Bont threw down an inspiring solo.The rest of the second set was a non-stop scorcher, which saw Mimi Naja return for “Worried About The Weather.” You can watch video of last night’s “Freeborn Man” below, courtesy of Troy Laur.You can see the setlist, courtesy of Lucas White, as well as a full gallery from Mark Raker below.Setlist: Greensky Bluegrass | 9:30 Club | Washington, DC | 2/2/2017Set 1: Groundhog (1) 》 Handle with Care, Depot Bay, Take Cover, Better Off, Reverend, Crying Holy Unto the Lord, While Waiting, All FourSet 2: Cold Feet, In Control > Can’t Stop Now (2), Luckiest Man (3)(4), Freeborn Man (5)(6) 》The Four, Wheel Hoss, Forget Everything (7), Worried About the Weather (8) 》Foxy Lady 》Worried about the WeatherE: Fixin’ to Ruin (9)Notes: (1) “Reuben’s Train” teases, (2) Martin Luther King “Dream” speech quotes, (3) With Jay Cobb Anderson and Mimi Naja, (4) “Say It Ain’t So” quotes, (5) Anders vocal mirror guitar during opening, (6) “Paint It Black” teases, (7) With Mimi Naja on harmony vocals, (8) “Dark Star’ teases, (9) Kevin Gregory on vibraslap Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Gifford holds 105th Annual Meeting, $27,000 in awards given

first_img*** Gifford Healthcare,Gifford’s Best Kept Secrets’ was the theme of the Randolph hospital’s 105th Annual Meeting of the Corporators held Saturday evening at Gifford. It is also the theme of the medical center’s 2010 year-in-review Annual Report.The report and meeting described the hospital’s efforts around cancer, surgical and emergency care. Talked about were little known programs like the Gifford Adult Day Program in Bethel and inpatient rehabilitation in Randolph, and the availability of high-tech diagnostic imaging.‘‘I didn’t know Gifford did that.’‘ It’s a statement hospital staff and leaders hear regularly, hospital Administrator Joseph Woodin told corporators filling Gifford’s Conference Center. ‘So we put it in the Annual Report. I hope you read it and get the word out.’Also described were the hospital’s 11 consecutive years making its budget and operating margin.‘Our goal has always been an operating margin of 2.5 to 3 percent,’ said Woodin.Others have seen their budget dollars and operating margins swing wildly from highs to lows. Showing Gifford’s financial stability over the past decade, and thus modest but consistent investment, Woodin noted, ‘We actually do work quite differently than other organizations.’Part of its success is due to its planning efforts. The medical center is amid its fourth consecutive three-year strategic plan.‘What does the community need? What do our patients need? What does the hospital need?’ Woodin said the planning process asks and addresses.The current plan aims to make Gifford a medical center of choice for patients, staff and health providers by addressing quality, relationship building and teamwork. Long-term facility planning is another important component, but temporarily on hold due to looming health care reform and budget cuts in Montpelier.Woodin called Vermont a leader in the nation when it came to health care and showed a chart from the Commonwealth Foundation, an independent, non-profit research institute, ranking Vermont top in the United States when it comes to health care.‘In Vermont, we do very well. We’re currently the standard,’ said Woodin, who has testified before the Senate Finance Committee on health care reform. ‘My caution to the politicians is that we’re not trying to go from a C or D grade. We already have an A.’Rather than complete reform, or slashing budget cuts, Woodin proposed cost saving ideas that could be implemented now to reduce health care costs statewide. Not duplicating X-rays or other studies as patients move between community and tertiary care hospitals was one example. Limiting health care advertising was another. A third addressed the hospital budgeting process and savings that could be realized from a two-year budget cycle.Health care reform has been, and will continue to be, a discussion at all hospital Board of Trustees meetings, Chairman Bob Wright said, describing the active board’s monthly meetings and participation in committees. ‘It’s a well-informed board,’ he said, calling Gifford an ‘affective’ and ‘conscientious team.’‘Gifford’s pretty special. I’ve heard this from many different sources and in many different circumstances,’ said Wright.ElectionsWelcomed to that active board was Lincoln Clark of Royalton, a past board member. Clark replaces former Vermont Technical College president Ty Handy who has moved to Florida. Corporators were unanimous in their support for Clark.Also unanimously supported were new corporator members Rod and Marilen Tilt, John and Ruth Lutz, Mona Colton, Carol Bushey and Mike Ross.Awards and scholarshipsA host of awards and scholarships were also announced.Betina Barrett-Gallant, a Gifford employee and daughter of the late Dr. Richard Barrett, named Stockbridge resident and operating room nurse Fern Rogers the winner of this year’s $1,000 Dr. Richard J. Barrett Health Professions Scholarship.The award is given annually by the Medical Staff to an employee or employee’s child pursuing a health career. Rogers is pursuing her registered nurse degree at Vermont Technical College.The Philip D. Levesque Memorial Community Award is given annually to a White River Valley organization involved in the arts, health, community development, education or the environment. Levesque was Gifford’s president and chief executive officer from 1973-1994.This year’s winner of the Levesque award is the Granville Volunteer Fire Department, family physician Dr. Ken Borie announced. The volunteer fire department will use the funds to buy medical equipment to help launch a first response team to medical emergencies in Granville, Hancock and the surrounding area as necessary.And William and Mary Markle Community Foundation grants amounting to nearly $25,000 were given to 14 area organizations, including several food shelves and many children’s recreation programs.This year’s winners, announced Development, Marketing and Public Relations Director Ashley Lincoln, were:â ¢ Bethel Food Shelf ‘ $1,490 to purchase a refrigerator and freezer⠢⠢ Cabot Recreation Dept. ‘ $1,500 for snowshoes and soccer goals⠢⠢ Chelsea Little League Baseball ‘ $1,580 for a pitching machine and pitchers’ screen⠢⠢ Chelsea Recreation Association ‘ $2,000 for summer camp swimming lessons⠢⠢ Gifford Family Center ‘ $1,800 for family educational workshops⠢⠢ Gifford Pharmacy Department ‘ $2,718 for ‘Cactus Smart Sinks’ for the safer disposal of medications⠢⠢ Green Mountain United Way ‘ $1,200 for its Building Healthy Communities activity program⠢⠢ Randolph Area Food Shelf ‘ $2,500 toward its building relocation and renovations⠢⠢ Randolph Elementary School ‘ $1,500 for an industrial-grade food processor for the Farm to School Program⠢⠢ Randolph Village Fire Dept. ‘ $750 for a gas detector for a new pumper truck⠢⠢ Randolph Wrestling Club ‘ $1,500 to create a nonprofit club and program support⠢⠢ Randolph Youth Basketball ‘ $1,575 for a score clock and other program supports⠢⠢ Rochester Public Library ‘ $2,000 in matching dollars toward the purchase of an elevator⠢⠢ South Royalton Community Food Shelf ‘ $2,495 for a freezerâ ¢Formally the Gifford Community Health Grant Program, the grants were renamed for the late Bill Markle and his wife Mary in 2009. Bill Markle had been a former board member and long-time supporter of Gifford. Mary Markle was in attendance, along with about 90 others, at this year’s Annual Meeting when the grants were announced.Gifford has been offering the annual grants to community non-profits for 10 years, amounting to nearly $250,000 given to the community in the last decade, Lincoln noted.Special presentationThe meeting concluded with a special presentation from Gifford’s Surgery Division leaders ‘ Medical Director and general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli, Vice President of Surgery Rebecca O’Berry and nurse manager Jamie Floyd.The trio described the breadth of surgical and specialty services at Gifford, including podiatry, urology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, general surgery, anesthesia, neurology and pain management.‘We’re very unique. Many hospitals of larger size don’t have this amenity,’ Dr. Ciccarelli said of the pain management care provided by specialist Dr. Lan Knoff.O’Berry said that was the beauty of Gifford.‘We never think of ourselves as a small institution. We look at ‘What does the community need?’‘ she said.Urology is an example. There are only 400 urologist in all of the United States and Canada. Gifford currently has two working part-time as well as a full-time, experienced urology physician assistant. And the medical center just recruited a third provider, Dr. Richard Graham, who is slated to start in May.Gifford also offers some specialties in multiple locations for the convenience of patients, including urology, which is in Randolph and White River Junction. Podiatry is in three locations ‘ Berlin, Randolph and Sharon.Specific services were also described along with technology and quality improvements.Floyd called cataract surgery ‘ a simple, quick and needle-free procedure ‘ one of the most ‘life altering’ surgeries. ‘It’s really amazing to walk into an OR with someone who can’t see and to walk out 20 minutes later with someone with nearly 20/20 vision,’ he said.New technology included updated sterilization machines, a new ‘mini c-arm’ for use by primarily Gifford’s podiatrists to get an image or continuous live view of a joint during surgery.Thanks to the generosity of a donor, who gave the hospital $200,000 to purchase a stereotactic breast biopsy system, the hospital will soon add this technology. Stereotactic breast biopsies are less invasive than surgical options and especially beneficial for women with an abnormality near the chest wall.Quality improvements have included a move toward a latex-free operating room, a surgical safety checklist and patient survey, and even new clocks ‘ a small but meaningful change.Previously, clock times varied by several minutes one way or the other. A patient could leave the operating room at say 11:26 a.m. and ‘ remarkably ‘ arrive in recovery suite at 11:24 a.m. Or, they could leave operating room at 11:26 a.m. and not arrive in the recovery suite ‘ just a short distance away ‘ until quite a few minutes later.The new clocks are linked to a central radio transmitter, meaning each reads the same time and patient charts reflect these accurate, consistent times.Source: Gifford www.giffordmed.org(link is external). Photos Gifford Medical Center Administrator Joseph Woodin speaks at Saturday’s 105th Annual Meeting of the Gifford Corporators ‘ a citizen body that helps oversee the hospital, serves as community liaisons and committee members, and elects the Board of Trustees.Kitchen and maintenance teams.Surgery Division Medical Director and general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli describes the vast array of surgery and specialty services available at Gifford.Podiatrist Dr. Paul Smith uses the ‘mini C-arm’ during surgery.last_img read more

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Naval Special Warfare Operators Assist Honduran Military in Establishing Elite Maritime Unit

first_img NSWTE-A also focused its efforts on partner nation self-sustainment strategies when seven FEN members were selected as future instructors, shadowing NSW counterparts during all training evolutions. This mentorship provided each Honduran instructor with the competence and confidence to conduct future selection courses and internal sustainment training unilaterally. Outside of the physical and technical training that is associated with a special operator, NSWTE-A focused on creating a team of communication specialists within the FEN to become experts in Harris radio technologies, a skill set that is lacking in most Central American units due to the lack of expertise. During a recent six-month deployment, members of Naval Special Warfare Task Element-Alpha (NSWTE-A), a deployed maneuver element attached to Naval Special Warfare Unit-FOUR (NSWU-4) in support of Special Operations Command South, partnered with their Honduran counterparts to train and increase the military capacity of the newly established Honduran Fuerza Especiales Naval or (FEN). The FEN is a maritime unit of Special Operators capable of combating transnational organized crime in and around their waterways. “The unique task organization, presentation of functional skill sets, and development of unit pride and esprit de corps has effectively paved the way for continued Honduran led training and operations in the future in order to keep their borders secure against transnational organized crime and illicit trafficking,” said the NSWTE-A officer in charge. NSWU4, stationed in Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek, Va., and in support of SOCSOUTH, headquartered at Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla., designed and implemented a comprehensive training and maintenance plan to build the FEN into a strong counter-narcotic force. Organizational departments were also created to include assault, boats, communications, engineering and training with a senior officer and enlisted advisor assigned to each department. To compliment the efforts of the Navy SEALs, members from Naval Special Warfare Special Boat Team 22 also spent a month with counterparts from NSWTE-A training the FEN in basic watercraft maintenance skills and procedures, nautical chart familiarization, boat vectoring and intercepting techniques, small boat handling tactics, and long-range navigation exercises. With a rate of 86 people killed for every 100,000 inhabitants, Honduras is considered one of the most dangerous countries in the world according to statistics from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) report in 2011. center_img By Dialogo February 08, 2013 Some of the conditioning assessments included an eight-mile log physical training event and a six-nautical mile ocean swim across the Bahia de Trujillo. After completing these physical and mental hardships to become a member of the FEN, the 45 qualified individuals continued through more rigorous and operationally-focused skills training, which completed their transformation into a disciplined and dedicated team capable of providing the Honduran Fuerza Naval a capable maritime branch of special operations. Ten operators from SEAL Team 18, attached to NSWU-4, spent six months training and observing the FEN in a multi-disciplinary approach, resulting in 45 highly qualified Honduran Special Operators by the end of the two, eight-week Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/s) style training. These courses were modeled after the BUD/s selection training done by the U.S. Navy SEALs in Coronado, Calif. “In my whole military career, I can only remember three times when radios were used successfully on a mission,” said the FEN’s commanding officer. He added that the skills learned during this training should improve the success rate of radios during military movements. With a murder rate four times higher than Mexico, these alarming numbers depict a nation where violence is part of everyday life. Many of these casualties are linked to narcotics trafficking, where Honduras and other Central American nations are used as a transit point from South America into Mexico and the U.S.; the preponderance of these illicit activities enter the region by maritime. “The combination of SEALs and Special Boat Operators provided the FEN with arguably the best maritime training available within USSOF”, said the NSWTE-A officer in charge. last_img read more

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Studies reaffirm 2 vaccine doses in kids, show safety in pregnant women

first_imgNov 2, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Interim clinical trial findings announced today affirm that children younger than 10 need two pandemic H1N1 vaccine doses, and initial findings in pregnant women reveal no safety concerns and a need for only one dose.Federal officials also detailed the role of an independent panel of experts to review vaccine safety data and released a report outlining the government’s vaccine safety monitoring system.At a media briefing today, Bruce Gellin, MD, director of the National Vaccine Program at the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), said federal officials realize that, despite problems with vaccine supply and demand, Americans still have concerns about its safety. He told reporters that an independent expert group charged with reviewing vaccine safety data met for the first time today to become familiar with the data sources they’ll be reviewing.In addition, a federal task force today released a 20-page report that outlines beefed-up systems that officials have put in place to monitor the safety of the vaccine. US health officials are mindful of the 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign, which reached more than 40 million people but was associated with an increase in cases of Guillian-Barre syndrome, a temporary paralytic condition.Though vaccine safety and purifications steps are much more advanced today, officials have added new systems to track the pandemic H1N1 vaccine and are taking extra steps to add transparency to the process, in hopes of reassuring the public.Anne Schuchat, MD, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters that a cumulative total of 30 million doses of pandemic H1N1 vaccine have been produced for states to order, which represents an increase of 3.4 million since Friday.Vaccine data for childrenThe latest findings of vaccine efficacy in children come on the heels of a recommendation from World Health Organization (WHO) vaccine experts who on Oct 30 recommended that most people, even young children, receive just one dose of the vaccine.Though the group acknowledged they didn’t have much data to base their guidance on, they said countries that have placed children as a high-priority group to receive the vaccine should administer one dose so they can immunize as many children as possible.Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the findings today, from National Institutes of Health (NIH) studies, are critical to public health officials who are charged with making policy decisions and to the public for making personal decisions for themselves and their loved ones.He said interim results on vaccine in healthy children ages 6 months to 17 years confirm early results reported on Sep 21. The new findings show that children younger than 10 who receive a second 15-microgram (mcg) dose of pandemic H1N1 vaccine have significant immune response improvement.The new data were obtained 8 to 10 days after the second vaccine dose, compared with the first findings, which were obtained 21 days after the first dose.In the youngest children (6 to 35 months), 100% had a robust immune response after the second dose compared with only 25% after the first dose. In those ages 3 through 9, 94% had a robust immune response after the second dose, compared with 55% after the first dose.Immune responses were comparable in those receiving two 15-mcg doses and in those who got two 30-mcg doses, suggesting that the smaller dose is enough to elicit a strong immune response, according to an NIH press release today.”Our guidelines seem to fit quite nicely with the science,” Fauci said at the news conference. “We would like to get children as fully protected as we can.”Efficacy in pregnant womenIn the initial results on the vaccine in pregnant women, immune response to the pandemic H1N1 shot was similar to that seen in healthy adults.Public health officials have placed pregnant women at the front of the line to receive the vaccine because they have been disproportionately hit by the virus. So far the CDC has received reports of at least 100 pandemic flu infections in pregnant women that required intensive care unit (ICU) treatment, as well as reports of 28 deaths.In a subgroup of 50 pregnant women participating in an NIH clinical trial, a preliminary analysis of blood drawn 21 days after vaccination showed the vaccine was likely protective in 23 of 25 women (92%) who received a single 15-mcg dose and that it was likely protective in 24 of 25 (96%) who received a single 30-mcg dose.The trial began on Sep 9, according to an NIH press release. Participants were between ages 18 and 39 and were in their second or third trimester when they began the study. The ongoing study will also assess the effects of a second dose. Investigators are using Sanofi’s pandemic H1N1 vaccine, which does not contain the preservative thimerosal or an immune-response-boosting adjuvant.Despite the heightened threat of the virus to pregnant women, public health officials worry about the uptake of the pandemic vaccine in this group, because only about 15% of pregnant women typically receive the seasonal vaccine. Safety monitoring of the drug conducted by researchers and an independent expert panel so far suggests that the vaccine is well tolerated, with no safety concerns so far.”For pregnant women, who are among the most vulnerable to serious health problems from 2009 H1N1 infection, these initial results are very reassuring,” Fauci said.Vaccine-safety groupGellin said the independent vaccine safety expert group that met today in its first face-to-face meeting will meet biweekly to review the latest data and will report its findings each month in a publicly accessible conference call with the HHS’s National Vaccine Advisory Committee.The vaccine safety group will be receiving regular briefings from the NIH and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency (BARDA) and can convene rapidly if needed.See also:Nov 2 NIH press release on vaccine response in childrenNov 2 NIH press release on vaccine response in pregnant womenFederal Immunization Task Force report on plans for monitoring pandemic H1N1 vaccine safetySep 21 CIDRAP News story “Trial predicts 2 H1N1 shots for young kids, 1 for older”last_img read more

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