Blues win after horror injury

first_imgOxford 1Royal Navy 0Blue was the colour as Oxford met the Navy at Iffley Road on Monday. Only the sky, a pale grey pall, failed to turn a matching shade, as swirling rain and a breezy wind joined force to inhibit Oxford’s passing game, though the home side eventually triumphed with a 1-0 win.Just five days earlier, the season opener against Loughborough III had fallen decidedly flat as the game was abandoned after five minutes. If expectation and hope were the predominant emotions for the Blues at the start of the Loughborough match then these were soon replaced with expectation and hope of a very different kind with players crossing their fingers for their injured team mate, James Perkins. As the ball broke outside the area, Perkins stretched for the first real tackle of the game. It seemed an innocuous tussle and play continued as a Loughborough attacker lashed a sumptuous drive which inched the wrong side of the post for a goal kick. But that goal kick was never taken as, immediately, both team benches jumped up and hollered for an ambulance. Perkins had broken his leg in what was a morose ending to a promising match. Rustiness turned to well-oiled, lamb to lion as the Oxford beast was woken from its slumber. Aided by the gale, Simon Jalie curled a well-worked free kick over the bar, and then bulleted a shot against the opposing keeper when put through one-on-one. Routine balls over the top were turned into lethal opportunities as the soddened turf favoured the mental and physical speed of the home attack. One might have thought that the Navy would be adept at watery situations. Yet they were more barnacle than good ship as they just about managed to hold out until the break. But on 47 minutes their defence was breached. A break down the left saw Luther Sullivan slide through a simple cross for the onrushing Vince Vitale, who evaded the all-at-sea defence and slotted into the empty net. A simple goal, almost matched seconds later when the omnipresent Vitale crossed for Joel Lazarus, who thrashed a fierce drive wide. Oxford were looking comfortable, the defence in particular excelling. The wiry James Doree ranged up and down the left flank, Owen Price was superb in the air, and the team was well marshalled at the back by the pairing of Captain Jack Hazzard and Paul Rainford. The five coaches of the mariners decided to make a change, bringing on the aptly named duo of Major and Salt. With the wind in their favour they pushed back the Oxford defensive line, and only a lack of polish on their final ball stopped them from getting back into the game. Referee Taylor turned down what seemed a legitimate penalty as the Navy’s Hirst was felled after a corner. A closer escape was to follow for Oxford as their opponents had a goal ruled out when Navy captain Thomas needlessly nodded in a goalbound shot from an offside position. Oxford clung on for a win that was, on balance, deserved. With their naval foe dispatched and Perkins’ injury partly exorcised, the Blues can look forward to the rest of the season with confidence and relish.After the match, Hazzard said he was “pleased with the result more than the performance.” But, he added, “conditions were tough and I know we can play better. We just needed to get our first win of the season. Hopefully the performances will come off that.” Of Perkins’ injury, Hazzard said it was too early to comment. Cherwell would like to wish him a speedy recovery.After an execrable opening period some observers might have wished that Referee Bruce Taylor would also swiftly end the match against the Royal Navy. The Oxford machine mirrored the rusty leaves falling from the trees. The only highlight, if one can call it that, was a facial injury to a Navy player who returned to the pitch with his face plastered with tape, looking like Hannibal Lecter from Silence of the Lambs. But it was Oxford who played like silent lambs until, on 25 minutes, from out of the grey, Matt Rigby bolted a 40-yard drive which cannoned back off the bar.ARCHIVE: 3rd week MT 2005last_img read more

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The community builders

first_imgWhen the leadership of Harvard College changes hands later this summer from interim Dean Donald Pfister to incoming Dean Rakesh Khurana, undergraduates will find that while the life experiences and research backgrounds of the two couldn’t be more different, their focus on the job of dean is the same.Both Pfister and Khurana believe strongly that an important role for the dean is to foster and build the College community of learning.“My goals were modest in a way, but they were really about reaching out and connecting with the students, and working within the College to make sure we weren’t merely in a transition, but moving the College forward,” said Pfister, the Asa Gray Professor of Systematic Botany. “When I think about the year, a lot of what we have been able to do has been about community, which is good because that is where I started when I came in.”Pfister was named interim dean in July, taking over for Evelynn M. Hammonds, who completed her five-year term as dean shortly after Commencement 2013. As Faculty of Arts and Sciences Dean Michael D. Smith put together a search committee to find a replacement, he appointed Pfister on an interim basis.Immediately, Pfister, who has taught at Harvard for 40 years and had served as master of Kirkland House from 1982 to 2000, sought to connect directly with students by word and action. He began sending all undergraduates periodic email messages touching on a wide variety of topics, such as some of the incredible things College students were doing, the latest book he was reading, and — he’s a botanist — the trees of the Yard and certain fungi he had come across.“Nearly every conversation I have had with a student has almost always started with, ‘I just love your emails.’ I was a surprised because when I send an email out to students in my class, they never read them. But these emails seem to have been very widely read,” Pfister said. “I was thinking emails were kind of retro, but they worked, and I think they worked because it set the tone that someone was listening. It goes back to community.”In addition to his emails, Pfister made it a point to be out around the campus, visiting the Houses, attending festivities and performances, and meeting with students as much as possible. One winter morning, he rode the shuttle, where he interacted with students and even handed out bookmarks with his office hours listed on the back.“I was concerned office hours were just going to be a thing where students would come in and complain, but it was really an opportunity to help students, and to direct them to resources,” he said. “And it was a great way to hear what was really on the minds of the students.”While his research interests are different, Khurana is coming into the job on a path that has some similarities to that which Pfister traveled. Both are highly respected teachers, veterans of various committees, and have served as House masters. In fact, as dean, Khurana will continue to serve as co-master of Cabot House.His vision for the future of the College builds on the foundation that Pfister has laid.“We want to ensure we are providing students a deeply transformative experience, one that is transformative intellectually, socially, and personally, that will prepare them for a life of service and leadership,” Khurana said. “Our students have the opportunity to interact with the best faculty in the world, who are doing research that is changing the way we think about and understand the human condition. They are asking fundamental questions about the nature of life and where we come from, and imagining new futures.”The Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development at Harvard Business School (HBS) and professor of sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), Khurana said that for nearly 400 years Harvard has produced leaders and shaped academia, and that should continue.“Harvard College should be seen as the leading College in the world and will set the standard for liberal arts colleges for the next 100 years. We should be providing a model for other schools to revitalize and reenergize their programs,” Khurana said. “This is who we are. Our students leave here and exert ripples across the world.”last_img read more

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ROTC works to ‘serve others’ with blood drive

first_img “A central idea of the military is looking to serve others at all times,” senior Army ROTC cadet Kyle Hanratty said. “This event is a great way for us to accomplish that goal.” The blood drive takes place from noon to 6 p.m. both days in the LaFortune Ballroom. The drive will be run by the service clubs of the Army, Navy and Air Force branches: the Alliance to Lead and Serve (ATLAS) Club, the Trident Naval Society and the Arnold Air Society.  Hanratty also said ATLAS is looking to have a group of students travel with non-ROTC Notre Dame students to Honduras during fall break to work in orphanages there.  Hanratty said the blood drive is open to all students, staff and faculty, not just ROTC students, and that campus-wide participation is necessary for the three service clubs to surpass last year’s total of 235 pints of blood donated. In order to address this “vital need” for blood as fully as possible, all the blood donated at the event will be given to the American Red Cross. In addition, snacks and drinks will be provided to all donors. The semi-annual blood drive is one of several service events sponsored by the three ROTC service clubs, including the Trident Naval Society’s 24-hour run around campus and ATLAS’s volunteer program at the Robinson Community Learning Center. center_img “Being in the military gives you a whole different perspective on the vital need for blood as a means of saving lives,” Hanratty said. “But that need is a common one that isn’t just limited to the military.” In keeping with the spirit of service at Notre Dame, the University’s three Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) branches are sponsoring their semi-annual blood drive today and Thursday. But Hanratty said achieving the blood donation goal is not simply a matter of beating last year’s total; rather, the more blood donated, the more people will benefit from the generosity of the Notre Dame community. “This blood drive and the other ROTC service projects really represent the military’s commitment to service,” Hanratty said. “But we need the help of all students to accomplish our service goals.”last_img read more

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