Pro-Shot Video Of Aqueous, Joel Cummins, And Vinnie Amico’s “Kid Charlemagne” From SCAMP

first_imgOne of the most talked-about highlights in the wake of the annual Summer Camp Music Festival this Memorial Day has been groove rock quartet Aqueous‘s Thursday, 5/25 sunset performance. The set was the first of two full-band slots over the course of the festival (guitarist Mike Gantzer also joined Umphrey’s McGee member Ryan Stasik and Kris Myers for a tribute to Green Day‘s pop-punk classic Dookie), and the Buffalo natives made it count, offering up some incredible improv as well as a couple of very special surprise guests.Summer Camp Music Festival Kicks Off With Massive Thursday Pre-Party [Photos]The previously-planned Dookie set turned out to not be the only Aqueous/Umphrey’s crossover of the weekend, as Aqueous was joined by Umphrey’s keyboardist Joel Cummins and moe. drummer Vinnie Amico for a funky run through Steely Dan‘s 1976 hit “Kid Charlemagne.” Today, Aqueous has finally released pro-shot video of the Umphreys/moe. collaboration, so we can all relive the surprise sit-in in full multi-camera HD. You can check Joel and Vinnie’s guest appearance with Aqueous at Summer Camp below, via the band’s YouTube page:SETLIST: Aqueous | Summer Camp Music Festival | 5/25/17SET 1: Skyway > Origami1 > Second Sight, Kid Charlemagne2 3, Triangle > Strange TimesNOTES:1 Unfinished2 First Time Played, Steely Dan Cover3 Featuring Vinnie Amico (moe.) on drums, Joel Cummins (Umphrey’s McGee) on keyboards[Cover photo via Phierce Photo by Keith G.] Although collaborations like this double-trouble sit-in at Summer Camp tend to be rare, fans will have the chance to see some brand new Aqueous/Umphrey’s McGee crossover action next Friday, July 7th, Umphrey’s McGee will return to Central Park’s SummerStage, with Aqueous serving as the band’s opening act. Immediately following the SummerStage performance, fans will head downtown to the Highline Ballroom, where Aqueous will host their own headlining official late-night show featuring help from Joel Cummins and his Umphrey’s bandmate, guitarist Jake Cinninger.  Tickets are still available for both the SummerStage show and the Highline Ballroom late-night.last_img read more

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Sensitive art

first_img The daytime look of Geros’ public art installation at the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Latent (e)Scapes Recent Harvard Graduate School of Design graduate Christina Leigh Geros is the winner of Radcliffe’s biennial public art competition. Her exhibit, “Latent (e)Scapes,” consists of 1,600, 1/8-inch acrylic rods that glow. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer A jury of Harvard faculty members including Radcliffe Dean Lizabeth Cohen selects the winner.“The public art competition invites students throughout the Harvard community to be part of Radcliffe’s mission of advanced study by being creative outside the classroom,” said Cohen. “Latent (e)Scapes is a breathtaking visual statement. And it’s also an inspiring blend of art, science, and landscape that captures well Radcliffe’s commitment to supporting work that crosses disciplines in new ways.”Inspiration struck Geros during January break in 2013. On a drive from the East Coast to Kansas, she was taken with the waving dune grasses along the New England shore and their icy inland counterparts — “a family of tall grasses frozen in time” that blanketed much of the Midwest state.“I had this idea that if those grasses were of a synthetic material but within a naturalistic environment to some degree … their movement would have this sort of natural state to it, [but] the synthetic-ness would call your attention to something seemingly out of place.”For the installation, Geros worked with Cambridge Landscape Co. on the fabrication of the nine different “scapes.” Her colleagues at the design collective SHO, GSD alumni Gregory Thomas Spaw and Lee-Su Huang, along with interactive design specialist Jake Marsico, helped her fine-tune the computer elements and the lighting. When it was complete, “the interactivity of it became everything we could imagine it to be,” she said.It also became a way to engage people with art in a different way.Some of the best public art makes “a statement about your interaction within that space or that place’s connection to a larger environment,” Geros said.Working in the natural environment brought a unique set of challenges. The no-mow grass was supposed to reach between four and eight inches, but Geros quickly noticed some patches weren’t getting anywhere near that long. The reason? “Hungry bunnies,” she said of the rabbits that make the garden lawn their regular twilight meal. “They are mowing the grass.”As the seasons turn, weather will become an important factor. Geros tested a few acrylic rods last winter and they held up to February’s frigid temperatures. She also planted a few rods near the GSD campus to check their durability under the weight of the snow. They didn’t bend, but she remains realistic about the primacy of New England winters. A repeat of last year’s would temporarily put her work out of sight.“Fingers crossed,” she said, “I really hope we don’t have a serious winter.”Latent (e)Scapes Geros: “I had this idea that if those grasses were of a synthetic material but within a naturalistic environment to some degree … their movement would have this sort of natural state to it, [but] the synthetic-ness would call your attention to something seemingly out of place.” Photo by Kevin Grady Inspiration struck Geros during January break in 2013. On a drive from the East Coast to Kansas, she was taken with the waving dune grasses along the New England shore and their icy inland counterparts — “a family of tall grasses frozen in time” that blanketed much of the Midwest state. Photo by Kevin Grady Growing up in east Tennessee, Christina Leigh Geros reveled in the natural fireworks exploding nightly in her yard.“When I think about summer or even spring and fall, I think about lightning bugs, because our lawns would just be covered in these glittering lights. To me, that’s an evening outdoor space,” said the Harvard Graduate School of Design grad, whose next stop is Indonesia for a year of digital storytelling on a Fulbright-National Geographic Fellowship.What she’ll leave behind at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study tells a physical story of nature, movement, space, and especially light. Those vivid firefly memories inspired a particularly brilliant feature in Geros’ installation at the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden. Unveiled in May as the winner of Radcliffe’s biennial public art competition, “Latent (e)Scapes” consists of 1,600, 1/8-inch acrylic rods that glow.In the daytime the translucent bars — planted in nine berms of long Pennsylvania sedge and a no-mow fescue mix — resemble long, sprouting extensions of the surrounding yellow-green grass. At night, LEDs embedded in the tubes transform the garden into a glowing landscape sensitive to its surroundings.The rods are connected to sensors that relay information to an intricate system of computers that regulate the light. They change color, shifting from solid white to red and orange, and fluctuating in intensity in response to motion from passersby. Soon, another computer connection will enable the rods to react to natural forces such as heat, wind, and humidity.The competition, which began in 2013, offers degree students from across the University, regardless of concentration, the chance to submit a design for the garden space in Radcliffe Yard. At night, embedded LEDs transform the garden into a glowing landscape sensitive to its surroundings. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6aXqgu8NOI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/k6aXqgu8NOI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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USC continues winning ways with final-day surge

first_imgThe No. 1-ranked USC women’s rowing team capped off another successful weekend up in Gold River, Calif., winning yet another team championship at the 2013 Lake Natoma Invitational on Sunday.Leading the pack · The No. 1-ranked USC women’s rowing team boasts two first-place finishes in 2013 as it nears closer to the postseason. – Courtesty of Dan AvilaThe Women of Troy proved victorious in the varsity eight event and finished second in both the varsity four boats and the second varsity eight.“This was a very good regatta for us,” USC head coach Zenon Babraj told USCTrojans.com. “It was a good experience and especially difficult because it was after a couple of big wins in San Diego. We beat the No. 2 crew in the country today. We had a good Saturday and won all our races, but the main races were today when we raced Cal and Stanford in the finals.”On the final day of races, USC was tested on the 2,000-meter course by two of the top teams in the nation, taking on No. 2-ranked California followed by No. 9-ranked Stanford.In its first race of the day, USC’s varsity four squad, coxed by sophomore Paige Fernandes, logged in a time of 7:20:00, which was good enough for second place behind Cal’s  time of 7:16:10, 3.90 seconds faster than the Trojans.The foursome, stroked by freshmen Kamali Houston and Darian DiCianno along with juniors Kajsa Olsson and Eglit Vosu, came in 2.20 seconds ahead of the Stanford four in order to capture that second-place spot.“The four did a very good job. Cal didn’t race its four down in San Diego at the Crew Classic. They are ranked really high and some people think that they are the fastest four in the country,” Babraj told                    USCTrojans.com. “We did well, though, with some fight. Our four was only four seconds behind so that’s very promising.”In the day’s closest race, USC’s second varsity eight battled Cal’s boat for the entire 2,000 meters, but sophomore starboard Elizabeth Turner and the Trojan bow ball crossed the line just 1.90 seconds after the Golden Bears (6:31:30). Both teams handedly beat the Cardinal, who came in at a time of 6:46:40.“We had a good race, but the young boat with a freshman stroke struggled a little bit in the middle of the race,” Babraj told                                                          USCTrojans.com. “The fight lasted the entire 2,000 meters. With four weeks to go before the Pac-12 championships, there’s still some work to do, and we can field a second varsity eight that can be even more competitive.”Determined to overcome two second-place finishes, the Trojan boat strived to come out on top in the day’s main event, the first varsity eight. Coxed by Jennah Blau and with junior All-American Vineta Moca at stroke, the USC boat trailed early to both Cal and Stanford through 500 meters, but made its move across the halfway mark to take the lead.The Women of Troy held their water the rest of the way to capture the win in a time of 6:20:40 and remain undefeated in 2013. Cal finished 3.6 seconds slower at 6:24:00 and staved off Stanford, who came in at 6:25:90.“This was a good experience,” Babraj told USCTrojans.com. “It’s something that gives us good information on what we need to work on and what we need to do. This was a very important race for the first eight and they gave a great performance. Everybody was prepared for them, but they were ready and came out on top. That was great for the entire team.”In the final team standings, Cal finished second behind USC with Stanford and No. 12 Notre Dame tying for third.USC will have a break from racing next weekend, as it prepares to take on crosstown rival UCLA in their annual dual on May 4 in Marina Del Rey, Calif.last_img read more

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