Sensitive art

first_img The daytime look of Geros’ public art installation at the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Latent (e)Scapes Recent Harvard Graduate School of Design graduate Christina Leigh Geros is the winner of Radcliffe’s biennial public art competition. Her exhibit, “Latent (e)Scapes,” consists of 1,600, 1/8-inch acrylic rods that glow. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer A jury of Harvard faculty members including Radcliffe Dean Lizabeth Cohen selects the winner.“The public art competition invites students throughout the Harvard community to be part of Radcliffe’s mission of advanced study by being creative outside the classroom,” said Cohen. “Latent (e)Scapes is a breathtaking visual statement. And it’s also an inspiring blend of art, science, and landscape that captures well Radcliffe’s commitment to supporting work that crosses disciplines in new ways.”Inspiration struck Geros during January break in 2013. On a drive from the East Coast to Kansas, she was taken with the waving dune grasses along the New England shore and their icy inland counterparts — “a family of tall grasses frozen in time” that blanketed much of the Midwest state.“I had this idea that if those grasses were of a synthetic material but within a naturalistic environment to some degree … their movement would have this sort of natural state to it, [but] the synthetic-ness would call your attention to something seemingly out of place.”For the installation, Geros worked with Cambridge Landscape Co. on the fabrication of the nine different “scapes.” Her colleagues at the design collective SHO, GSD alumni Gregory Thomas Spaw and Lee-Su Huang, along with interactive design specialist Jake Marsico, helped her fine-tune the computer elements and the lighting. When it was complete, “the interactivity of it became everything we could imagine it to be,” she said.It also became a way to engage people with art in a different way.Some of the best public art makes “a statement about your interaction within that space or that place’s connection to a larger environment,” Geros said.Working in the natural environment brought a unique set of challenges. The no-mow grass was supposed to reach between four and eight inches, but Geros quickly noticed some patches weren’t getting anywhere near that long. The reason? “Hungry bunnies,” she said of the rabbits that make the garden lawn their regular twilight meal. “They are mowing the grass.”As the seasons turn, weather will become an important factor. Geros tested a few acrylic rods last winter and they held up to February’s frigid temperatures. She also planted a few rods near the GSD campus to check their durability under the weight of the snow. They didn’t bend, but she remains realistic about the primacy of New England winters. A repeat of last year’s would temporarily put her work out of sight.“Fingers crossed,” she said, “I really hope we don’t have a serious winter.”Latent (e)Scapes Geros: “I had this idea that if those grasses were of a synthetic material but within a naturalistic environment to some degree … their movement would have this sort of natural state to it, [but] the synthetic-ness would call your attention to something seemingly out of place.” Photo by Kevin Grady Inspiration struck Geros during January break in 2013. On a drive from the East Coast to Kansas, she was taken with the waving dune grasses along the New England shore and their icy inland counterparts — “a family of tall grasses frozen in time” that blanketed much of the Midwest state. Photo by Kevin Grady Growing up in east Tennessee, Christina Leigh Geros reveled in the natural fireworks exploding nightly in her yard.“When I think about summer or even spring and fall, I think about lightning bugs, because our lawns would just be covered in these glittering lights. To me, that’s an evening outdoor space,” said the Harvard Graduate School of Design grad, whose next stop is Indonesia for a year of digital storytelling on a Fulbright-National Geographic Fellowship.What she’ll leave behind at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study tells a physical story of nature, movement, space, and especially light. Those vivid firefly memories inspired a particularly brilliant feature in Geros’ installation at the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden. Unveiled in May as the winner of Radcliffe’s biennial public art competition, “Latent (e)Scapes” consists of 1,600, 1/8-inch acrylic rods that glow.In the daytime the translucent bars — planted in nine berms of long Pennsylvania sedge and a no-mow fescue mix — resemble long, sprouting extensions of the surrounding yellow-green grass. At night, LEDs embedded in the tubes transform the garden into a glowing landscape sensitive to its surroundings.The rods are connected to sensors that relay information to an intricate system of computers that regulate the light. They change color, shifting from solid white to red and orange, and fluctuating in intensity in response to motion from passersby. Soon, another computer connection will enable the rods to react to natural forces such as heat, wind, and humidity.The competition, which began in 2013, offers degree students from across the University, regardless of concentration, the chance to submit a design for the garden space in Radcliffe Yard. At night, embedded LEDs transform the garden into a glowing landscape sensitive to its surroundings. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6aXqgu8NOI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/k6aXqgu8NOI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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Handbell Choir to tour in China

first_imgFive years ago, Jonathan Noble, director of Notre Dame’s Beijing Global Gateway, heard the Notre Dame Handbell Choir perform before a group of senior Chinese education officials. With plans underway to open a new location, Noble decided the handbells would play at its dedication, Karen Schneider-Kirner, director of the Handbell Choir, said. This weekend, 14 members of the Handbell Choir will travel to Beijing to play for the long-anticipated dedication, followed by a week of concerts before Chinese audiences.“For the staff that works there, it’s a big deal to highlight why they’re there,” Schneider-Kirner said. “They want to introduce more Chinese students to Notre Dame, but also provide a space where American students can go and learn more about Chinese business practices or get involved in other universities over China.”The new center is located in Genesis Beijing, a state-of-the-art building offering filtered air and access to cultural events, lectures and an art museum. After the Gateway’s dedication ceremony, the choir will play several more concerts in Beijing before traveling to Chengdu.“The bells originated in China. It’s one of the oldest musical instruments we have, but Chinese people in general know nothing about what we know as a handbell choir today, with the smaller brass bells playing different tunes and intricate patterns,” Schneider-Kirner said. “It will be something very unique to the people we’ll be playing for.”In addition to the cultural connection, the bells offer a means of avoiding the censorship of China’s atheist government, Schneider-Kirner said.“With the bells, it doesn’t involve lyrics. As more of a sacred music group, I think we can translate better since China overall is a pretty atheistic country,” she added.The Handbell Choir will, however, be able to participate in Catholic services at South Cathedral in Beijing and Pinganqiao Cathedral in Chengdu.“This is a pretty groundbreaking trip because we’re also doing things within the Catholic Church,” Schneider-Kirner said. “About a year ago, a Fr. Matthew, the rector of South Cathedral in Beijing, came to meet with [University president] Fr. John [Jenkins] as a way to open up doors for collaboration. He’ll be saying a Mass with us and then we’ll be doing a concert at the Cathedral for a hundred seminarians.”The Handbell Choir will play several more concerts in and near Beijing over the next few days: three at an international school, one in collaboration with a Chinese instrument orchestra at Peking University and one on the Great Wall.“We’re just stuffing bells in our backpacks and bringing portable music stands,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Apparently it’s nothing we can ask permission for; we’re just going to do it and see what happens.”After a few days in Beijing, the choir will fly to Chengdu, where they will play two more concerts in collaboration with Szechuan University.“We’ll combine with different groups: There’s a Chinese instrument orchestra, a 25-member erhu orchestra, a 50-member choir and a symphony orchestra from the school,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Some of these pieces we’re doing together; in order to bridge the gap, I’ve arranged a bunch of traditional Chinese music pieces that I think will work well on the bells, just so we’re not bringing completely unfamiliar music.” About one third of the music the choir will play on the trip is traditional Chinese music, while the other two thirds are drawn from their usual repertoire, Schneider-Kirner said. The choir will finish their tour playing at a Mass and concert at Pinganqiao Cathedral in Chengdu and sharing a dinner with the parents of a former choir member. Schneider-Kirner explained that the purpose of the trip is to convey a message of welcome from Notre Dame to the students at the various universities they will perform at and to bridge the cultural gap.“We thought it would be a great opportunity … to do things within the Catholic church, which is pretty phenomenal. I don’t know if any other Notre Dame groups, particularly religiously affiliated, have ever done anything in China. It’s definitely groundbreaking in that way,” Schneider-Kirner said. “Primarily, it’s a great opportunity to promote peace and understanding and building bridges with our sisters and brothers in Asia.”Tags: China, fall break, Handbell Choirlast_img read more

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Property software + new media: surf’s up for commercial sales

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Ellen Receives New UNMEER Head

first_imgPresident Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has met with the new Special Representative of the United Nations (UN) Secretary General and Head of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), Mr. Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed.The Liberian President received Mr. Ahmed and his delegation at her Foreign Ministry office during a courtesy call on Tuesday, January 6, 2015,  where brief acquaintance pleasantries were exchanged.   Mr. Ahmed, a Mauritanian, replaces Mr. Anthony Banbury. Special Representative Banbury was the first envoy appointed by UN0 Secretary Ban Ki-Moon during the heat of the Ebola crisis in the sub-region. He initially noted that his mandate was to eradicate the virus from the sub-region. Mr. Banbury’s tour of duty ended over the weekend, thereby ushering in the new envoy.President Sirleaf welcomed the new Head of UMEER to Liberia and described the work of his predecessor as excellent and very supportive of the country’s fight to contain the deadly ebola virus disease.“Your predecessor effectively spearheaded the operations of UMEER with huge progress. Even though the country still has a lot to be done with regards to Ebola, much was achieved with the assistance and cooperation of UNMEER,” President Sirleaf indicated.She pledged her government’s support to the transitional process in UNMEER and emphasized the need for improved and strengthened regional collaboration and cooperation in the continued fight against the further spread of the deadly Ebola virus disease.She named exchange of information, experiences and best practices as important elements required to enhance regional cooperation and collaboration in the Ebola fight, thereby acknowledging that some level of regional collaboration is taking place, but still below the level it ought to be and stressed that the regional dimension of the virus makes it difficult for progress to be made in one country without the corresponding progress in the others.The new UNMEER Head, Cheikh Ahmed, expressed appreciation for the leadership and commitment of the Liberian government, which he considers the main factor responsible for the level of progress made in Liberia’s fight against the further spread of the Ebola virus disease.He pointed out that the mechanism for coordination may not be perfect but has impacted the Ebola fight in Liberia and the region very efficiently.Mr. Ahmed indicated that UNMEER will also focus on helping government reactivate the educational system and declared the mission’s support to the back to school effort. He,  however, advised that appropriate measures and processes be put into place to protect both the students and staff as Ebola is still active in Liberia.Mr. Ahmed was accompanied by the Secretary General’s  Special Representative of the UN Mission in Liberia, Karin Landgren; UN Ebola Envoy, David Nabarro; and Mr. Peter Graff; while Health Minister, Dr. Walter Gwenigale; Minister of State Without Portfolio, Mr. Sylvester Grigsby; and Dr. Emmanuel Dolo, were also in attendance.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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SPORT RESULTS 7 LST

first_img7th last Race: The Cochin Plate, Div-I, 1200M.7th last Race: The Cochin Plate, Div-I, 1200M.Mountain Force (Mr C R Balakumar and Mr Fazal-Ul-Rehman) 52 Tanveer Alam, First.Golden Millenium 61 A Imran Khan, Second.Glorious Crown 56.5 C Umesh, Third.City Of Song 54 P M Bopanna, Fourth.Not Run:Deal Maker,Rest All Ran.Won by: S.Neck, 3-3/4L and 3/4LTime: One Min and 15.31 secs.Winner trained by: Fazal-Ul-RehmanFavourite: Golden Millenium.PTI COR ROH KK KK PMlast_img

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How the CEO Should Launch a Blogging Program

first_imgKeyboard / TastaturThis is a part of a series that was cre­at­ed to help you get the prac­tice of cor­po­rate blog­ging built into your com­pany.  This series will walk through the process, nec­es­sary roles, in addi­tion to guides for each role to help your com­pany get started quickly.Use the following checklist to ensure that this effort will have the greatest probability of success.The executive team should ensure that all items are checked off and the blogging administrator should ensure that the executive team is following through on the checklist. We have discussed, prioritized, and approved this effort as a corporate initiative.We have set quantitative goals for this effort.We have communicated the importance of this initiative to our employees and have made it clear that blogging is a corporate priority.Employees who will be blogging understand that blogging is now a part of their performance goals.We have assigned a blogging administrator who is committed to the goals.The blogging administrator has developed an appropriate plan and we have approved the resources that will be necessary to execute the plan.The blogging administrator has set up the blogging platform and the training program and is ready to train the bloggers.The blogging administrator will report the results to us each quarter.We will adjust the communication and the goals based on the results from the effort.Next week I’ll post a checklist for the blogging administrator that will help your team get the most out of their blogging experience.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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