Greensky Bluegrass Kicks Off D.C. Run, Invites Fruition Members For Wood Brothers Cover [Setlist/Watch]

first_imgLast night, Greensky Bluegrass hit Washington, DC for the first of their three nights at the 9:30 Club with friends Fruition. Greensky certainly rose to the occasion, putting together a solid show that inevitably will get fans stoked for the next two nights. In honor of Groundhog’s Day and in keeping with tradition, the band opened with “Groundhog.”Moving into the second set, the band was fired up, busting out “Cold Feet” to kick things off after set break for a stacked second set. After “Can’t Stop Now,” which featured quotes from Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream Speech,” the band began a cover of The Wood Brother’s “Luckiest Man.”  For this track, Mimi Naja and Jay Cobb Anderson of supporting band Fruition joined Greensky. Following this sit-in, Greensky busted out “Freeborn Man,” during which Michael Bont threw down an inspiring solo.The rest of the second set was a non-stop scorcher, which saw Mimi Naja return for “Worried About The Weather.” You can watch video of last night’s “Freeborn Man” below, courtesy of Troy Laur.You can see the setlist, courtesy of Lucas White, as well as a full gallery from Mark Raker below.Setlist: Greensky Bluegrass | 9:30 Club | Washington, DC | 2/2/2017Set 1: Groundhog (1) 》 Handle with Care, Depot Bay, Take Cover, Better Off, Reverend, Crying Holy Unto the Lord, While Waiting, All FourSet 2: Cold Feet, In Control > Can’t Stop Now (2), Luckiest Man (3)(4), Freeborn Man (5)(6) 》The Four, Wheel Hoss, Forget Everything (7), Worried About the Weather (8) 》Foxy Lady 》Worried about the WeatherE: Fixin’ to Ruin (9)Notes: (1) “Reuben’s Train” teases, (2) Martin Luther King “Dream” speech quotes, (3) With Jay Cobb Anderson and Mimi Naja, (4) “Say It Ain’t So” quotes, (5) Anders vocal mirror guitar during opening, (6) “Paint It Black” teases, (7) With Mimi Naja on harmony vocals, (8) “Dark Star’ teases, (9) Kevin Gregory on vibraslap Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Lightning In A Bottle 2017- A Preview of the Can’t Miss Music Magik!

first_imgLightning in a Bottle is not merely a music festival, but instead an unparalleled gathering where people congregate to experience open-minded community, and concepts for living a brighter tomorrow.  The instructions are quite simple, and the LIB Thrive Guide says it best: “Lead by example. Pack it In and Pack it Out. Honor the land. Respect others and their journey. Practice good citizenship. Own your actions. Go above and beyond.”LIB is unique for each person who attends the affair; no two LIBs are the same. Some focus on seminars and workshops, listening to ideas and inspirations from a cavalcade of gurus, experts, healers and leaders. Others seek out the litany of visionary installations and collaborative art projects evolving each year. People go to LIB for the diversified yoga programs, the learning kitchen, the spirituality, the tea houses, the improv troupes, the fashion, and the dozens of thriving subcultures. This year, The DoLab is unveiling The Compass; an evolution of educational workshops and content offerings. The Compass will bring a renewed focus on connecting activism and grassroots organizing to our core ethos of education, healthy living, environmental stewardship, and cultural respect. Families, loners, and longtime festival crews come back to LIB to experience what is among the most engaging, socially conscious, and interactive music festivals on the planet. The word “transformational” is thrown around a lot these days, but there is no irony, sarcasm, or tongue planted in cheek here; Lightning in a Bottle is a life affirming endeavor that can fundamentally change somebody, if they are willing and able to surrender to the flow.Lightning in a Bottle 2017, taking place over the long Memorial Day weekend holiday May 24-29, is shaping up to the best and most vibrant yet. Maybe the most amazing part of LIB is the wide-ranging blend of progressive music, across numerous genres and beyond! Below you will find a short list of B.Getz’s “Can’t Miss Musical Magik!”, you can check out his L4LM coverage from last year’s LIB revelation HERE.Have a gander at LIB 2017’s mammoth schedule right here!You can still cop tix to LIB 2017 HERE….but before we get to the epic tunes, a quick homie plug for Fest300’s Eamon Armstrong and his Thursday afternoon workshop. I feel this topic is extraordinarily relevant in this space and time, and encourage both sexes and all peoples to attend and engage.EAMON ARMSTRONG: HOW TO DISMANTLE TOXIC MASCULINITY 12:45 – 1:45 Thurs. BeaconThursday May 25thBeaconAabo- Thursday 9:15pm (and Fri. 3pm at Pagoda)Ultimate Fantastic-11:15pm Brian Hartman – 12:30am-  (and at Favela Bar 2:30pm Sunday) PagodaAn-ten-nae-  12am (midnight)  Friday, May 26thLightning StageClimbing Poetree (w/Lydia Violet) -5pmNicola Cruz 7:45pmThunder StageCharlesTheFirst- 2:45pmTroyBoi- 12:30amGrand ArtiqueElephant Revival 5:45pmOrgone- 7:15pmBootleg Sunshine 9:15pmDirtwire 2amPagodaSaqi- 7pm (and Beacon 2:30 am Friday)GoldRush 9pmBeaconMark Farina 7:30pmLodgeElisa Rose 10pmPavilionRyan Herr 10pm Saturday May 27thLightningBob Moses 11:15pmKaytranada 12:30amThunderSpacegeishA 12:15pmKalya Scintilla 7:45pmDimond Saints 9:30pm Kraddy 12 midnightFavela BarZach Walker 8pmSaand 12:30amPatricio 2amBeaconDJ Nadi 6:45pmLodgeMigaloo 8pmPavilionYaarrohs 1amwords: B.Getzfestival images: Jacob Avanzatocenter_img Crossroads PavillionSun Hop Fat 8pmSabo 9:45pmSunday May 28thLightningBonobo Live Band 10:30pmBassnectar 12:30amThunderMaddy O’Neal 1pmPaper Diamond 9:30pmIvy Lab 11pmWoogieKLMN 2:30pmMonolink 6:30pmGrand ArtiqueGene Evaro Jr. 5:45pmPagodaNaughty Princess 6pm Morillo 9pm WoogieHernan Cattaneo- 12 midnightPagodaSmasheltooth vs. The Pirate 3pmAndreilien 3amFavela BarMUSICIS4LOVERS PRESENTS: SUNSET SPANKING FT. FAT BITCH AND THE BOOTY BOSS (JIMBO JAMES B2B DADON) PLUS DINK! & HYLAS- 5pmBeaconStellamara 2:30amThe LodgeDELPHI 5:15pmlast_img read more

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Dean Khurana’s freshman year

first_imgRakesh Khurana, the Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development at Harvard Business School, professor of sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and co-master of Cabot House, took the helm as dean of Harvard College last July. Khurana has been a member of the Harvard community for 16 years, earning his Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1998. As Cabot House co-masters, Khurana and his wife, Stephanie, have lived at Cabot with their three children and 375 undergraduates since 2010. Khurana is an award-winning teacher and widely recognized scholar. In a question-and-answer session, he spoke about his first year as dean: Taking stock of the College’s successes and challenges, contemplating its future, and letting loose with his iTunes playlist.GAZETTE: As a scholar of management and leadership, how have you approached your role as dean?KHURANA: I’ve tried not to have any preconceptions of what the right approach is. For me, it’s been about listening very carefully to my faculty colleagues, my student colleagues, and my staff to find the opportunities to ensure the mission of the College is accomplished in a way that is both consistent with our values and meaningful to the present day in the context of the changes that are happening in the landscape of higher education and the increased diversity of our student body and faculty. This first year has also been about ensuring that in all those areas — academic, social, and supporting students — that it’s done in a way that is consistent with the mission of the College to educate citizens and citizen-leaders for our society.GAZETTE: From Harvard defeating Yale for its eighth straight Ivy League title to responding to record snowfall, Harvard College has experienced great success this year. What were your favorite moments with students?KHURANA: Of course there are those big moments, but I found the small moments with students to be the most impactful. One that stands out: Early in the fall semester I stayed over in one of the freshman dorms and we had dinner together. It was such a beautiful night we ended up outside on the grass spending time talking about the things that are important — students’ experiences and perspectives and everyone’s dreams and hopes for their Harvard education.GAZETTE: You have often said you are most proud of the collaborations the College has built with students. How does this collaboration help support the mission of the College?KHURANA: Most of the significant challenges and opportunities we face in the world are not things that anybody faces alone. They require building a foundation of trust and understanding, while also finding common ground with others. It’s hard for me to separate students, faculty, and administration — and while I know different people play different roles, ultimately I believe we are all “Harvard.” How we work together and how we share our diverse perspectives has led to a deeper understanding of each other. This type of capacity-building has been central to creating a supportive and diverse living environment where students can safely embark on their journey of intellectual transformation.GAZETTE: What changes can new and returning students expect when they arrive on campus this fall?KHURANA: I think this year has been a time of active discussion about how we create a more inclusive Harvard community. Additionally, we have sought to strengthen ourselves as a learning community in which the intellectual experience is the foreground of the Harvard College student experience. I think we can expect those discussions to continue to evolve this fall, and we will see meaningful progress in strengthening important academic aspects of the College, including expository writing, freshman seminars, and the General Education program. Also, students will see a renewed focus from the College on ensuring the Houses and the residential Yard experience provides greater inclusive social alternatives for students to engage with each other.GAZETTE: You’ve made diversity and inclusion a central part of your work this year as dean. Why does Harvard College place so much value on a diverse community of students?KHURANA: Our diversity is our strength. To me, diversity of intellectual thought, which is deeply enriched by people who bring different cultural perspectives and lived experiences, is what is most valued here at Harvard College. We are educating our students to be citizens and citizen-leaders in one of the most diverse societies in the world, one that is becoming even more diverse, and the challenge for the American experiment — the challenge for the global experiment — is how we continue to thrive in that world, rather than retreat back into tribalism, conformity of values, and closed-minded thinking.GAZETTE: Finally, perhaps most importantly for some of your students, what are the three most recently played songs on your iTunes playlist?KHURANA: [Laughs.] “Wagon Wheel” by Darius Rucker, “Come On Eileen” by Dexys Midnight Runners, and “Shake It Off” by Taylor Swift.GAZETTE: Any parting words as you close out your final weeks of your freshman year as dean?KHURANA: I want to express my gratitude to the faculty, the students, and the staff of Harvard College for being so helpful and supportive in welcoming me to this community and to this role. I knew that the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the College was special, but being part of it this year has made me realize the positive and important role the College plays not just in in higher education, but also … in creating an environment that cultivates respect for differences in points of view, and where all of us can learn from each other. We are all teachers and we are all learners.last_img read more

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Revised IORP Directive could be ‘impossible’ to pass, MEP warns

first_imgThe revised IORP Directive could remain “impossible” as European Union member states continue their opposition to Brussels being granted the requisite competences, the MEP charged with scrutinising European pensions legislation has said.However, Thomas Händel, elected this week as chairman of the European Parliament’s Employment and Social Affairs Committee (EMPL), said it was still important for him and his four committee colleagues to continue the push for a more integrated employment market, including a focus on pension matters.The MEP, a member of Die Linke – the left-leaning opposition party to Germany’s governing grand coalition – told IPE the “main question” for EMPL in the coming years would be how to address issues of social equality by addressing workers rights.Asked about the passage of the revised IORP Directive, published by internal markets commissioner Michel Barnier in March, he said he believed it would “remain impossible” so long as any of the 28 member states “oppose and deny any EU competences”. “In addition, the very different systems might be impossible to equalise,” he said.Händel said he was uncertain whether any elements of the former Portability Directive, revived last year after Barnier dropped more stringent capital requirements from the revised IORP Directive, would once again be discussed.“Concerning certain elements of the Portability Directive,” Händel said, “we have to wait for the first exchange of views between the political groups here in the Parliament.“But the increase of eurosceptics and the anti-EU movement will not make it easier to discuss the free movement of workers, and therefore pensions as well.”The Portability Directive was eventually passed by Parliament in April as a directive on supplementary pensions rights.It introduced universal vesting periods for benefit accrual but backed away from 2005’s initial suggestion that rights should be transferable when a worker moves to a new employer.Händel, now in his second term as an MEP, said he hoped a parliamentary majority could be found to “ensure the promise” made by the EU decades ago to create an environment where employees were free to work and live wherever they chose.“That necessarily means everyone should have the right to take pension credits with him, wherever he chooses to live,” he said.His comments come after the newly elected deputy chairman of the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee (ECON) – in charge of tax affairs, as well as scrutiny of proposals to allow the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority to raise a direct levy to fund itself – said the pensions industry should not cry foul, as it had never been hit.last_img read more

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UCLA steals one from Gonzaga

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) – Luc Richard Mbah a Moute provided a shocking ending to Adam Morrison’s amazing season. Mbah a Moute scored underneath with 10 seconds left and the second-seeded Bruins scored the final 11 points of the game to knock out Morrison and third-seeded Gonzaga 73-71 Thursday night to advance to the regional final. Morrison, Gonzaga’s shaggy-haired star, made two free throws with 3:26 to go, giving him 24 on the night and the Bulldogs (29-4) a 71-62 lead. But the Bruins (30-6) didn’t wilt. Mbah a Moute scored six of the final 11 points and got a key steal in the final seconds to seal the win and send UCLA to its first regional final since 1997. The Bruins will play Saturday against Memphis (33-3), which beat Bradley 80-64 in the first semifinal of the Oakland regional. The Tigers beat the Bruins 88-80 in November. Morrison put his hands on his head and leaned over, overcome with emotion, Mbah a Moute stole the ball from Derek Raivio with 2.6 seconds left, fighting tears in what was probably his final game in a Zags uniform. He is expected to turn pro. J.P. Batista missed a desperation 15-footer at the buzzer and fell into the Zags’ bench, where coach Mark Few helped him up. When the buzzer sounded, UCLA senior Cedric Bozeman ran around the court with the ball in his hands – Ryan Hollins right with him. Hollins and Afflalo went to help up Morrison, who was spread on the floor at midcourt. Few then came to hug the crying Morrison.last_img read more

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