Senate discusses future of COVID-19 response financial account

first_imgAt its weekly meeting Thursday, Notre Dame’s student senate focused on questions related to an account created last year which set aside approximately $200,000 of unused Student Union funds when the spring semester was cut short due to COVID-19.Senate order 2021-02, which created the COVID-19 Response Financial Account, stated that when student activities returned this semester, the senate would decide exactly how the money should be used.Senior Grace Stephenson, chairwoman of the Financial Management Board (FMB), joined the senate to give a presentation on the account and deliver the FMB’s advice on how to handle the unusual fund.“The intent with passing this order was to say we don’t know what’s going to happen in the future … We’re going to set [the money] aside so we can be intentional,” she said.The FMB suggested the senate move to set aside $10,000 of the COVID-19 Response Financial Account to be used for allocation to organizations for the remaining three months of the allocation period. In this plan, the remaining money would be withheld until the winter reallocation process. This would allow the FMB to gather more information on the 2021-2022 fiscal year and better evaluate future needs.Stephenson said the FMB still has some hesitations about the language of the order. Key among these concerns is that sales for The Shirt are down this year which will decrease future funding.The motion to go forward with the FMB’s plan will be voted on at next week’s senate meeting on Sept. 10.Outside of the COVID-19 Response Financial Account, the senate briefly discussed a few other pertinent topics.Senior and student body vice president Sarah Galbenski commended the student advocacy by the Notre Dame Strike for Black Lives.“Born out of this movement we’re going to have a racial justice working group, this Saturday, Sept. 5 from 4-5 p.m.,” she said.Following this announcement, senior and chief of staff Aaron Benavides gave an update on campus dining.“Campus Dining is really at the mercy of the state of Indiana right now in dealing with all the health and safety guidelines that the state is putting out,” he said.Galbenski also detailed the actions of the faculty senate recently, specifically referring to two movements. The first presented was a motion to aid in student mental health through professor flexibility, and the second was to create a partnership between the group of Black student leaders working with the Division of Student Affairs and a task force related to academic affairs and curriculum.Senior and student body president Rachel Ingal discussed the off-campus town hall Wednesday. She also provided an update on her and Galbenski’s presidential initiative, the inaugural Women’s Leadership Forum.“The vision is that this will be a monthly series, and the student body will be able to tune in and listen to different diverse sets of speakers,” Ingal said.After these announcements, Galbenski led the oath of office for four newly elected members, sophomores Albertina Estrada Martinez and Theresa Salazar, junior Bianca Burnett and senior Blake Johnson. By taking the oath, they became official senators. These new senators will join the current senators in next week’s vote on the COVID-19 Response Financial Account and FMB proposal.Tags: COVID-19 Response Financial Account, Senatelast_img read more

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New side-track well to unlock 1.7 million barrels of oil from Anasuria Cluster

first_imgAccording to Hibiscus, the GUA‐P1 side‐track project is an opportunity to re‐enter the existing GUA‐P1 wellbore and potentially drain additional volumes of hydrocarbons. The drilling of the GUA‐P1 side‐track well is estimated to start by the first half of calendar year 2019.Hibiscus Petroleum’s Managing Director, Dr Kenneth Pereira, said, “The GUA‐P1 side‐track project follows the successful drilling of the GUA‐P2 side‐track project which was completed in the third quarter of 2018 and has since contributed to enhanced production in the Anasuria Cluster. The GUA‐ P1 side‐track project will be funded from internally generated funds and is part of a series of production enhancement projects which are targeted to increase net production to 5,000 barrels of oil per day by FY2020.”The Anasuria Cluster consists of the Teal, Teal South, Guillemot and Cook fields which produce to the Anasuria floating, production, storage and offloading vessel. The Anasuria Cluster is located offshore in the United Kingdom sector of North Sea. Hibiscus Petroleum’s wholly‐owned subsidiary, Anasuria Hibiscus UK Limited, holds 50% joint‐operating interests in the Teal, Teal South and Guillemot fields, as well as 19.3% non‐operating interest in the Cook field. Hibiscus Petroleum’s jointly‐controlled operating company, Anasuria Operating Company (AOC), is on track to execute the Guillemot A GUA‐P1 side‐track well, a planned production enhancement project at the Anasuria Cluster concession in the UK North Sea.AOC was incorporated as a private limited company in England and Wales on July 22, 2015.AOC is the joint operating company held equally by Ping Petroleum UK Limited (wholly owned by Ping Petroleum) and Anasuria Hibiscus UK Limited (wholly owned by Hibiscus Petroleum Berhad) to be the operator of the Anasuria Cluster.Hibiscus said on Monday that the side-track well is targeted to unlock approximately 1.7 million barrels of oil from its current net 2P (proven and probable) oil reserves.AOC has, on February 28, 2019, signed a rig sharing agreement with Ping Petroleum, whereby AOC will assume the services of the Stena Spey semi‐submersible offshore drilling unit, for a minimum duration of 45 days, to drill the GUA‐P1 side‐track well.The Stena Spey drilling rig – which is owned and operated by Stena Spey Services Limited, a subsidiary of Stena Drilling Limited – was chosen for several reasons including certainty of the rig’s delivery schedule and strong past operating performance in the UK North Sea.In addition, as AOC’s appointed well operator, Petrofac will be responsible for drilling the GUA‐P1 side‐track project and for all the existing wells in the Teal, Teal South and Guillemot A fields. Petrofac is also installation duty holder on the Anasuria FPSO, minimizing the number of interfaces to be managed during drilling. Drilling to start in 1H 2019last_img read more

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Kearns not overly concerned by Kerry defeat

first_imgAmongst the other fixtures Clare beat Waterford by 1-10 to 0-8 at Meelick.It was a successful competitive start for new Wexford boss Davy Fitzgerald.They beat UCD by 5-31 to 1-08 in the first round of the Walsh Cup in Gorey.Tipperary native Eamonn Kelly’s first match in charge of Laois ended in a 3-18 to 0-22 win over NUIG in Rathdowney. The senior side went down 3-11 to 1-3 to Eamon Fitzmaurice’s side in their Group A clashDiarmuid Foley got Tipp’s goal in yesterday’s match at Austin Stack Park, Tralee.Kearns wasn’t overly concerned about the result last_img

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Are mail-in rebates too much work?

first_img Put a value on your time. “I just got the last two of five rebates,” one reader wrote. “I had to make three trips back to the computer store, use loads of my own ink to copy everything, waste about a day on useless phone calls, and in general experience so much frustration I almost threw the printer out. Never again!” My recommendation: Determine whether you’re being “paid” enough for the time spent to claim the rebate. On my average pay, I would have made more money writing. Calculate your true savings. From the advertised rebate amount, subtract the costs you incur for postage, envelopes, printing and copying. And don’t forget sales tax. “One of the worst things about rebates is that you have to pay sales tax on money not actually spent on the product,” a reader wrote. (The tax is typically levied on the full purchase price, before the rebate is applied.) You are put off, put out and for the most part thoroughly disgusted. Some of you fight back. And a few – I hand it to you – seem to have licked the system and offer smart tips. I’m talking about the labyrinth of mail-in rebates, the often mind-numbing chore of finding, cutting out, putting together and mailing the required universal product codes, proofs of purchase and sales receipts, then waiting weeks, if not months, for rebate checks to start trickling in. And that’s without having to deal with claims you did not send a form you did submit, when it becomes your word against theirs. I wrote in January about my own rebate hassles on a computer purchase. In response, I’ve received upward of 200 e-mails from readers, most with their own horror stories. From these e-mails – more than on any other subject in years – I’ve gleaned the following observations and suggestions: Know the rules. “I’ve been notified several times that an original UPC (universal product code) was not included with my submission,” a reader wrote. “But this was not one of the terms.” This reader, who knew that the rules required only a copy, had the rebates validated on the spot over the phone. Ask about store policy on receipts before you part with originals. “I bought a cookware set, which included a mail-in rebate for $20,” a reader wrote. “One stipulation was to include the original receipt. I did get the rebate, but then two of the pots’ handles cracked. You guessed it. I couldn’t return the set because I didn’t have the original receipt.” If you must submit the original of anything, get written confirmation of when and to whom you sent it, and keep a copy. Several readers told me that, thanks to their documentation, they received rebates denied at first. But not everybody succeeds. “My rebate was refused because they said I did not send in the original receipt,” a reader wrote. “I knew I had, but they refused the copies. I gave up and just let the $60 go on a printer. I found that if you can wait and watch for sales, you may actually save some money” without a rebate. Complain all the way up. “I didn’t know whom to turn to after my rebate request was rejected and the representative at the toll-free number could give me only scripted answers,” a reader wrote. “I went directly to the retailer that sold me the product. The situation was resolved, but I still had lingering feelings so I went on to make a complaint to my State Attorney General’s office.” Well done. If you are getting the runaround on rebates, the Federal Trade Commission recommends you complain to the state Attorney General’s Office, local Better Business Bureau or the FTC. For more information on consumer issues, go to the FTC Web site www.ftc.gov or call toll-free, 877-FTC-HELP (877-382-4357).160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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