Greyboy All Stars, Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band & More To Play Mustache Bash

first_imgWho doesn’t like a good mustache, right? Whether it is a Magnum P.I., the Fu Manchu, a solid Handlbar, or whatever you please, the mustache is certainly a symbol. If you are down with the stache, you can see plenty of them this Saturday, April 2nd, as The Greyboy Allstars, along with Yo Mamas Big Fat Booty Band, Stache Bash Family Band, and The Routine will be playing The 9th Annual Mustache Bash at The Port Pavilion in San Diego, CA.What began as a house party several years back has grown into a serious event in the San Diego area. There will also be an after-party featuring Con Brio and Groove Session at The Music Box. Sounds like a party to us!For more information about the event, head to their official website!last_img

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Watch Nathan Lane & James Corden Get Inappropriate

first_imgTwo-time Tony winner Nathan Lane (with new hairdo) stopped by The Late Late Show on October 8 and the inevitable happened with its host, Tony winner James Corden. The pair teamed up to do a number. Several numbers, in fact. The Broadway duo, alongside comedian Rachel Bloom, joined forces for Inappropriate Musicals, transforming classic scenes from The Terminator, The Exorcist and Se7en into musical theater. The results, below, were predictably hysterical. We’ll never hear the words “I’ll be back” in quite the same way ever again. Star Files View Commentscenter_img Nathan Lanelast_img

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Schools get smarter at discipline

first_imgNZHerald 29 Jan 2013 Fewer suspensions and expulsions do not mean kids are behaving better, writes Vaimoana Tapaleao. The number of students being stood down for bad behaviour is at its lowest point for more than a decade. Suspensions and exclusions are slightly lower than previous years and the number of pupils being expelled from school is also the lowest it has been in years. But principals, teachers and other experts say there is still an increasing number of children who are difficult to handle and that schools simply had better restorative programmes in place now – rather than children becoming better behaved. The latest figures on stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsion rates, released by the Ministry of Education, show a drop in all areas. In particular, stand-down rates have fallen for the fifth consecutive year since peaking in 2006. Back then, the age-standardised stand-down rate stood at 30.9 per 1000 students. The numbers fell to 24.5 stand-downs per 1000 students in 2011. Maori pupils and male students in particular continue to top the number of stand-downs.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10861951last_img read more

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LIAT appoints new director of flight operations

first_img Share Sharing is caring! 69 Views   no discussions Tweet Sharecenter_img BusinessLifestyleTravel LIAT appoints new director of flight operations by: Caribbean News Service – September 21, 2015 Share Captain Arthur SenhouseST JOHN’S, Antigua, Sep 21, 2015 – LIAT announced today the appointment of Captain Arthur Senhouse as Director Flight Operations (DFO) effective September 01, 2015, with responsibility for all aspects of the airline’s flight operations.Prior to taking up his current role, Captain Senhouse was the Chief Pilot – a position he took up in February 2014. He was responsible for the pilots and line operations.Captain Senhouse joined LIAT in April 1987. Since then he has held a number of senior positions within the company including Training Captain on the Twin Otter aircraft. He also served as Chairman of the Leeward Islands Airline Pilots Association (LIALPA).“We are pleased to announce the appointment of Captain Senhouse in the role of Director Flight Operations, overseeing one of the most important aspects of our airline’s operations,” Chief Executive Officer David Evans said.“His extensive experience within the airline will certainly add strength and depth to our senior management team.”Meantime, the new DFO said he is humbled by being chosen to head one of the most complex departments within the airline industry.“I have joined the management team of LIAT when the airline is at the crossroads of completing its fleet renewal programme and totally reinventing itself into a Caribbean entity we can be proud of,” Senhouse said.“I’d like to thank LIALPA, which I led in 2012, for providing exposure and training consistent with our line of work. I will work tirelessly to ensure that LIAT continues long after I’m gone so that, just as I dreamt to fly a LIAT aircraft; other Caribbean boys and girls may live that dream.”last_img read more

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PAHO/WHO Urges Northern Hemisphere Countries to Prepare for Heatwaves

first_imgWashington, D.C. (PAHO) – In view of the current heatwaves in Europe and predictions that this phenomenon will hit various parts of the Americas, the Pan American Health Organization/ World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) is urging countries in the North American, Central American and Caribbean region to be prepared for heatwaves, due to the impact that this could have on peoples’ health, including the risk of death.The heatwaves that have had the greatest impact since 2000 were the one in Brazil in 2010 that caused the death of 737 people, and the one in Argentina in the summer of 2013-2014 that caused 1,877 deaths and left 800,000 people with no power, which increased heat stress in that population. According to health authorities in the United States, heatwaves are the natural phenomenon that caused the highest number of deaths in that country.Weather forecasts for North America, Central America and the Caribbean (the Region) predict heat waves during the summer of 2019. This could increase drought-induced stress, lead to forest fires, and have harmful effects on human health.Contingency plans to address heatwaves Due to the situation, PAHO has developed a guide to help countries in the Region formulate contingency plans to address heatwaves. This guide provides recommendations that the health sector and meteorological agencies can implement to prepare for and better respond to this threat, promote health, prevent the adverse effects of heatwaves, treat affected people, and save lives.The document stresses that heatwave contingency plans should be able to determine the extent of the threat, with alert activation procedures, a description of roles and functions, and intra- and inter-agency coordination mechanisms.The document also highlights that countries should strengthen the epidemiological surveillance of heat-related morbidity and mortality, the capacity of health services (training of staff, improvements in the design of new hospitals, and equipping of existing hospitals in high-risk areas), and enhance the actions of local authorities, the media, and communities in terms of inter-agency response measures, prevention measures, and self-care. The impact of heatwaves on health Exposure to heat causes severe symptoms such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke (a condition which causes faintness, as well as dry, warm skin, due to the inability of the body to control high temperatures). The majority of heat-related deaths are due to the worsening of cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine and psychiatric conditions. Other symptoms include edema in the lower limbs, heat rash on the neck, cramps, headache, irritability, lethargy and weakness.People with chronic diseases that take daily medications have a greater risk of complications and death during a heatwave, as do older people and children.Reactions to heat depend on each person’s ability to adapt and serious effects can appear suddenly. This is why it is important to pay attention to the alerts and recommendations of local authorities.Preventing the harmful effects of heatStay tuned to weather alerts and forecasts.Avoid sun exposure between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.Do not leave children or older persons in parked vehiclesDo not exercise or engage in intense outdoor activities without proper protectionDrink water every 2 hours, even if you aren’t thirsty.Keep the home cool by covering windows during the day and using air conditioners or fans during the hottest hours.If you have a chronic disease and take drugs, consult your doctor. What to do if there are signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion or heat stroke:Heatstroke is a life-threatening medical emergency. The individual should receive medical care in a hospitalStop all physical activity.Call an ambulance immediately.Go to or move the affected person to a cool site.Use any physical means to facilitate cooling (such as cooling the head and body down with water and fanning the person to reduce their temperature).Warning signs in moderate and severe cases:Heat exhaustion:Heavy sweatingCool, pale skinTemperature < 40º CDizziness or faintnessHeadacheRapid breathingWeak, rapid pulse Heatstroke:Red, hot, and dry skinTemperature > 40ºCThrobbing headacheUnconscious or in a comaRapid, strong pulselast_img read more

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