Choosing TCU as a religious minority student

first_imgTexas Frog Camps are now free for incoming students Kaylee Bowershttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaylee-bowers/ Previous articleSGA supports addition of new minorNext articleWomen’s tennis signs five-star players to 2017 class Kaylee Bowers RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Graduation: Looking back Kaylee Bowershttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaylee-bowers/ + posts World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TAGSaudiovideo Bollywood cardio class spreads cultural awareness Twitter From Muscat to Fort Worth ReddIt printSome question why a religious minority student would choose to come to a majority Christian school.The answer for Hira Chaudhary, a senior political science major and the co-president of the Muslim Student Association, was simple.“I just wanted to stay close to home,” Chaudhary said. “And this was the closest college.”Staying local and finding good programs are driving factors for other religious minority students to come to TCU as well, said Britt Luby, an associate chaplain in Religious & Spiritual Life.Chaudhary is a Sunni Muslim who grew up in a religious home in Roswell, New Mexico. She said Roswell did not have a masjid, or a Muslim Sunday school, so her family would meet with other families nearby and form their own groups.Chaudhary said that this resulted in an inclusive and enjoyable atmosphere. She wanted to learn more about her faith, rather than feeling obligated to.When she moved to Fort Worth, Chaudhary said she went to a high school with a somewhat similar environment as TCU, so entering a new, majority Christian setting was never a huge concern.“I feel like TCU is a very open community, very welcoming,” Chaudhary said.Chaudhary joined MSA as a first-year student and has continued to be a member ever since.Photos from MSA’s Facebook pageThe group is small, consisting of only about 15 to 20 members, but Chaudhary said it is important to have on campus.“It’s important not to sequester ourselves, but to raise our awareness to the rest of the community; just to let them know that we’re here,” Chaudhary said.Luby says it’s easy for people to be afraid of what they do not know, and religious minority groups like MSA give more information about what Muslims students are really like.Other TCU religious organizations include Hillel, Young Life, Chi Alpha, Better Together and the Latter-Day Saint Student Association.Religious & Spiritual Life wants to make sure the minority religious students can grow in their faith just like the majority groups, according to Luby.Audio Playerhttps://www.tcu360.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Britt-Luby.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Luby discusses some of the common challenges faced by religious minority students. “Minority religious communities make our campus richer and give TCU students an opportunity to meet people who maybe aren’t exactly like them,” Luby said.Read more about the Muslim student experience at TCU here. Kaylee Bowershttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaylee-bowers/ ReddIt Facebook MSA co-presidents, Hira Chaudhary and Amal Khan Facebook Linkedin TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Kaylee Bowers Linkedin Kaylee Bowershttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaylee-bowers/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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Say your prayers for Theology degrees

first_imgOxford is considering a proposal to reform the university’s Theology course to give students scope to study a wider range of religions.The suggestion comes as a result of a 40 page review from the Faculty of Theology last year. The report recommends that the Faculty should “strongly consider” changing its name to Religious Studies in order to reflect the research interests of its academics and students.It said that “the requirement for all students to study Old Testament, New Testament, ancient doctrine and modern doctrine is old-fashioned, and whilst Oxford has traditional strengths in these areas, the argument that it offers a distinctive programme is no longer  adequate.” Oxford has led the world in the study of the divine for more than 800 years.Whilst some are supportive of the changes and believe them necessary to keep up with modern times, others have described them as a “suicide note”, believing that a Religious Studies faculty would quickly end up subsumed by History or Cultural Studies. It has been suggested by some academics that the university should offer an alternative course for those with an interest in the study of other religions.The changes have caused some controversy among current Theology students. Tim Bateman at Regent’s Park said, “I think the Theology degree does accommodate for the needs of those who want to study other religions.“If the course was changed, it would provide a wider spectrum of study. It would open up more options for a religiously diverse Britain. However… You might increase the breadth of study for undergraduates, but may compromise the depth of study for its specialised area, namely, Christian Theology.’However, second year Evie Deavall said, “The change from Theology to Religious Studies is, of course, a better reflection of the religious state of the world at the moment. It is a testament to the way in which Oxford is willing to change according to what is relevant.”In a public statement, Dr Paul Joyce, chair of the Theology Faculty, said, “Over the last 20 years, the curriculum has expanded to include the study of other faiths in addition to, and often comparatively with, Christianity. No decision to change the Faculty’s name to reflect that more diverse programme has yet been taken. Although the question is being discussed, it will not be resolved before the end of this academic year.“An alternative might be to change the name of the Final Honour School of Theology rather than that of the Faculty itself, but at this stage this remains only one possibility. Oxford Theology continues to affirm its strong commitment to teaching and research in the areas core to its discipline: Biblical Studies, Doctrine, and Church History.’No final decision is expected until October.last_img read more

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