How the Ebenezer Baptist Church has been a seat of Black…

first_img Please enter your name here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSAfrican American TheologyEbenezer Baptist ChurchFaithInspirationMartin Luther King Jr.The Conversation Previous articleCity of Apopka ranks in top 15% for 2020’s safest small city in FloridaNext articleMLK: Protest with resolve, and without violence Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate center_img Faith and InspirationBy Jason Oliver Evans, University of VirginiaThe high-stakes U.S. Senate race in Georgia catapulted the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church back into the spotlight. For 135 years, the church played a vital role in the fight against racism and the civil rights movement. It was the spiritual home of the civil rights leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.It is now the home of the state’s first Black senator – the Rev. Raphael Warnock, the senior pastor at the church.As a scholar of African American religion and Christian theology, I believe it is important to understand how the Ebenezer Baptist Church has been a seat of Black power and organizing for generations in Atlanta.‘Stone of help’Ebenezer Baptist Church, a predominantly African American congregation, was founded in 1886, nearly 20 years after the end of the Civil War. The pastor, Rev. John Andrew Parker, served as Ebenezer’s first pastor from 1886 to 1894. Little is known about Parker and Ebenezer’s early years. But according to historian Benjamin C. Ridgeway, Parker organized the church in a small building located on Airline Avenue in Atlanta.The name Ebenezer, meaning “stone of help,” comes from the Hebrew Bible. In the First Book of Samuel, the Israelites are said to have gathered in the town of Mizpah to offer burnt offerings to God. When their enemies, the Philistines, received notice that the Israelites were in Mizpah, they sent forces to attack them.With God’s help, the Philistines were eventually defeated. Prophet Samuel then named a large stone “Ebenezer” to remind the Israelites of God’s intervention in their battle against the Philistine army.As historians Roswell F. Jackson and Rosalyn M. Patterson observed in their 1989 article, “The selection of the name Ebenezer, ‘Stone of help,’ was profoundly prophetic.” In their view, Ebenezer’s name proved fitting to describe the role the church would come to have in the subsequent civil rights movement.Growth of the churchThe Rev. Adam Daniel Williams, the maternal grandfather of King, served as the second pastor from 1894 to 1931. Williams led the Ebenezer Church into the 20th century as a religious community mobilized to fight the segregationist policies plaguing the African American community in the state of Georgia.By 1913, the church had grown from 13 to nearly 750 members. Williams developed a distinct form of the social gospel, which emphasized the importance of African Americans owning businesses and taking social action against racial and economic injustice in their local communities.Known for his powerful preaching, impressive organizing, and leadership skills, Williams led several initiatives, including boycotts against a local Atlanta newspaper, “The Georgian,” which was known for using racist language against African Americans.In 1906, Williams led a fight to end the white primary system which prohibited African Americans from voting in the Georgia primaries. In 1917, Williams helped establish the Atlanta chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the NAACP.A year later, he was elected as branch president of the Atlanta chapter of the NAACP, and, within five months of his tenure, the chapter’s membership grew to 1,400.As religious historian Lewis Baldwin remarks in his book “The Voice of Conscience,” “Clearly, Williams used the [Ebenezer] church as a power base and rallying point for such activities, an approach that would also be used by [Martin Luther] King, Sr. and King, Jr.”Working for social changeFollowing Williams’ death in 1931, the Rev. Martin Luther King Sr., Ebenezer’s assistant pastor, and Williams’ son-in-law, became the church’s third pastor. During his 40-year tenure as pastor, “Daddy” King, as he was affectionately known, led Ebenezer with a mixture of evangelical faith and progressive social action.Finding warrant for social action in the Christian scriptures, King Sr. challenged other Black churches to embrace the social gospel – a late 19th-century Protestant movement that emphasized the application of the Christian message to the social and moral concerns of society.Moreover, King Sr. led marches and rallies to protest discriminatory and segregationist policies in the city of Atlanta, including the desegregation of the Atlanta Police Department and the Atlanta Board of Education. In the first 15 years of King Sr.‘s pastorate at Ebenezer, church membership grew to 3,700.MLK’s spiritual homeMartin Luther King Jr. Annual Commemorative Service at Ebenezer Baptist Church on Jan. 21, 2019, in Atlanta, Ga. Paras Griffin/Getty ImagesEbenezer came into the global spotlight when Martin Luther King Jr. accepted the call to join his father as co-pastor in 1960. Before then, King had pastored Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama from 1954 to 1959.During his tenure at Dexter Avenue, King served as president of the Montgomery Improvement Association, the organization which successfully led the Montgomery Bus Boycott from Dec. 5, 1955, to Dec. 20, 1956. In 1959, King resigned from his position as pastor at Dexter Avenue to serve alongside his father as well as serve as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which is also based in Atlanta.From the pulpit of Ebenezer, King preached some of his more memorable sermons. In one of his sermons published in a collection titled “The Strength to Love,” King describes racial prejudice as indicative of “softmindedness,” a person’s tendency to uncritically adhere to unsupportable beliefs.In the same sermon, titled “A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart,” King argued, “Race prejudice is based on groundless fears, suspicions, and misunderstandings.” To overcome this, King argued that human beings must cultivate both a tough mind and a tender heart, a joining of a critical mind with a concern for fellow human beings.This message reverberates in contemporary movements for racial equity and justice, including the Black Lives Matter movement. While many BLM members are not affiliated with any organized religion, the movement emphasizes the importance of spiritual wellness for African Americans as they fight for Black liberation.Since its inception, Ebenezer Baptist Church has been an institution in which evangelical fervor and progressive social activism joined to foster societal change.This year, the COVID-19 pandemic has prevented the spiritual home of King from hosting the annual commemorative service in honor of the slain civil rights leader, which usually draws 1,700 attendees. But attention to the church has been renewed following the election of Pastor Warnock to the U.S. Senate.One cannot appreciate the importance of MLK Day without understanding the tradition that formed one of America’s most influential civil rights leaders.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. preaching from his pulpit in 1960 at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. Dozier Mobley/Getty Images The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more

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In with the new

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. In with the newOn 1 Jun 2004 in Personnel Today How does the new HSC strategy fit in with preceding government strategies onhealth and safety and how will it influence workplace practices?In February this year, the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) launched itsnew strategy for workplace health and safety in Great Britain to 2010 andbeyond.1 Chairman of HSC, Bill Callaghan, says the strategy sets out what the HSC wantsto achieve through the contributions of HSE and local authorities (LAs), andconfirms the HSC’s intentions to understand and value the contribution ofothers in improving health and safety. OH departments within companies have grown as the complexities andlegislation surrounding the subject have developed and people become more awareof the intricacies of employment and the effects it can have on health. Butdoes this new document offer any hope, help or support to the OH professionalor even the hard-pressed employers? Background Many government strategies for occupational health and safety have been putforward over the past 40 years. In Tunbridge’s 1968 report on the care of hospital workers, it wasrecommended that all NHS staff should have access to OH services.2 Today, that is still not completely the case. The first document on OH, asopposed to safety, from HSC/HSE was published by EMAS in 1977.3 It suggestedthat small occupational health services run by nurses should be tested. Nothing was done after this original document to pursue this aim, and it wasalmost 20 years before OH was mentioned again, when the HSE launched its GoodHealth is Good Business (GHGB) campaign to raise awareness of OH issues in theworkplace and to improve employers’ competence in the management of healthrisks.4 The evaluation research of the campaign said that the report had led to somesignificant changes, but that the content and delivery of such campaigns neededto be improved and further research was necessary to explore why someorganisations were aware of the campaign and others were not.5 Other government departments produced documents focusing on the impact ofwork on health, such as Health of the Nation in 1993,6 later updated by achange in government to Saving Lives, Our Healthier Nation in 1999.7 This wasclosely followed by the Department for the Environment’s Revitalising Healthand Safety: Strategy Statement in 2000,8 and the HSC’s Securing HealthTogether, also in 2000.9 In 1998, the Department of Health producedOccupational Health Nursing: Contributing to Healthier Workplaces,10 and lastyear it brought out Taking a Public Health Approach in the Workplace.11 But is this all just government rhetoric or have there actually been anypositive changes in the delivery of OH services or the health of the workforceas a result of all these strategies and documents? The second biggest cause of sickness absence for longer than three days isdue to stress.12 It is arguable that the pressure of all the health &safety legislation is a contributing factor to this stress, especially forsmall and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) trying to keep up with theever-increasing and demanding legislation. Moving forward The new HSC strategy says its mission is “to work with LAs to protectpeople’s health and safety by ensuring that risks in the changing workplace areproperly controlled”, a concept that was first enshrined in the Health andSafety at Work Act 1974. While it is indisputable that the HASAW Act has played a key role inreducing accidents and fatalities at work over the past 30 years, the workplacehas changed since then. In the UK today, the majority of businesses employ fewer than 10 people,most of whom struggle with the mountain of health and safety legislation theyhave to cope with. It seems, therefore, that the HSC’s strategy is more gearedtowards large companies with professional HR, health and safety and OH departments,but the majority of small employers don’t have that sort of expertise availableto them and trust on maintaining good relations with their few employees. Only when the public may be involved with their undertakings, or insurancecompanies ask for policies and risk assessments, may health and safety rear itshead. So the new aims for both the HSC and HSE outlined in the document will bea tall order for these smaller organisations. The document says that the strategy has been developed through a process ofconsultation. However, despite the outline of the consultation process and thenumbers involved, many of the small businesses have no idea about health andsafety, let alone any new strategy or how it may relate to them. Strategy themes The strategy is divided into themes, with key points to support them: Developing closer partnerships In this section, occupational health is acknowledged as a rising challengenow that “causes of safety failure” have been brought under some sortof control. It identifies that OH offers a proactive approach to the management ofhealth risks at work. But is this sufficient, especially with a NHS gearedtowards treating the sick and injured. Such proactive occupational health iscostly and is not available on the NHS. And even if there is a cost saving tobe made in preventing sickness absence, rehabilitation programmes and gettingpeople back to work after sick leave, there may not be enough manpower to putOH into practice. Helping people benefit from effective health and safety management and asensible health and safety culture The setting up of a free, independent health and safety advice centrefocusing primarily on occupational health, promoting rehabilitation and gettingpeople back to work more quickly would be a good move, provided that it is welladvertised to small businesses. SMEs could then receive help and advice on how to deal with these matters,especially as they can’t always afford to employ a dedicated OH member ofstaff. Focusing on our core business and the right interventions where we arebest placed to reduce workplace injury and ill health. This theme reiterates what the HSE and LAs are all about and have beeninvolved with for many years. It really concerns enforcement of the ‘big boys’in significantly harmful environments, such as the chemical, nuclear andrailways industries. The inclusion of the views of stakeholders is at least apositive move forward. Communicating the vision Communication is key to realising any vision, and stating that the HSC andHSE need to do this effectively for their new strategy to work should be takenas given. This, after all, was the conclusion from the evaluation research ofthe GHGB campaign. The HSC says that its goal is not to create a risk-free society. Indeed, TheRoyal Society states that ‘risk is ubiquitous and no human activity can beconsidered risk-free’.13 Rather, the new strategy is working towards a society where risk is properlyappreciated, understood and managed, defending the system against those who areover zealous and cannot recognise the appropriate balance between risk andbenefits. If this can be achieved, then the strategy will certainly have madesome advances in this litigious age. It will be interesting to see the business plans and developments thatemerge from the HSE’s strategy, and to read the evaluation report after 2010 tosee how its results compare with the strategies of the past. References 1. A Strategy for Workplace Health and Safety in Great Britain to 2010 andBeyond, HSC (2004) 2. The Care of the Health of Hospital Staff: Report of the Joint Committeeof the Central and Scottish Health Services Council, Tunbridge (1968), London:HMSO 3. Occupational Health Services: The Way Ahead. (Prevention and Health Series),HSC (1977), London: HMSO 4. Good Health is Good Business campaign, HSE (1995) 5. Evaluation of the Good Health is Good Business Campaign, ContractResearch Report 272/2000, HSE (2000) 6. The Health of the Nation: a Strategy for Health in England, DoH (1992),London: HMSO 7. Saving Lives: Our Healthier Nation, The Stationery Office, DoH (1999) 8. Revitalising Health and Safety: Strategy Statement, The StationeryOffice, DETR (2000) 9. Securing Health Together: A Long-Term Occupational Health Strategy forEngland, Scotland and Wales, HSC (2000) 10. Occupational Health Nursing; Contributing to Healthier Workplaces, DoHand the English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting(1998), London: ENB 11. Taking a Public Health Approach in the Workplace; a guide forOccupational Health Nurses, DoH (2003), London: DoH 12. www.hse.gov.uk/stress 13. Risk: Analysis, Perception and Management: Report of a Royal SocietyStudy Group, The Royal Society (1992), London: Royal Society last_img read more

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It’s all about the “fit” – get the absolute best out of employees!

first_imgIf you’re a sports fan like me, it’s interesting to see how players can struggle with one team, get traded to another, and all of a sudden blossom into a superstar. That process is especially maddening if a player started with your team and blossoms while playing for your rival! Often, the explanation for this occurrence is that he/she was a better “fit” with the new team.When thinking about it further, that player could’ve been a better fit with the new team’s coaching, system/style of play, or structure and discipline – in other words, they fit better with the culture. Additionally, the reference to fit could also apply to his/her new teammates or maybe a slight change in positioning – in other words, they fit better into a new role.Both of these issues – culture and role – are vital to your credit union’s ability to attract and retain the best talent … to produce your version of “superstars”!Before any long-term success can be attained, you need to do two things:Clearly define your desired culture. And be specific about the qualities you will demand in future employees who will perform within your culture.Identify the desired competencies for each role. Again, specificity is important but so is prioritization. Don’t create a list of 20 competencies; create a list of the most critical one or two.Consider the following retail examples and how they may apply to your organization:For their retail stores, Nike hires people who are passionate about sports. They may not be great athletes themselves, but they love sports, both as a player and fan. Are your employees passionate about working at the credit union and serving your members?Apple knows that most customers come into their stores with a tech problem – either their current tech isn’t working and/or they need new, better tech. As a result, the number one quality they look for in a retail associate is empathy. Your employees are tasked with solving member’s financial problems, too … is empathy the number one quality possessed by each employee?Regardless of the position, Disney says their candidates must immediately demonstrate friendliness in the interview process. If a candidate doesn’t freely and obviously smile, make eye contact, be genuinely warm, etc. they will not advance to a second interview (regardless of how much experience they have). Do your employees immediately and obviously demonstrate friendliness?Unlike other restaurants, Chick-fil-a does not look for previous experience in their recruiting process. In fact, they would prefer to hire someone who has never worked in fast-food before. They don’t want to break old habits; they want to shape new ones. How important is previous credit union or banking experience in your selection process?As each of these companies has done, your credit union should identify what’s most important to you and your culture. Then, once you’ve identified it, don’t waver from it – don’t give in to the temptation to hire someone who looks/sounds good but isn’t passionate or empathetic or obviously friendly. As an old boss used to tell me, “Your biggest fear will be an empty chair. But don’t make hiring decisions out of fear.” You only get one chance to fill that empty chair; make sure you do it right the first time by sticking to what you said is most important to your culture and organization.The retail examples above focus on the need for a strong culture fit; now let’s talk about the equally important need for position or role fit. In the sports analogy mentioned in the first paragraph, the new team wants to acquire a player who possesses the talents, skills, and competencies that are appropriate for the game plan they want to deploy – not what the other team(s) deploy. What game plan is your credit union looking to deploy?During a recent culture assessment with a client, we received the three following responses to survey questions:I enjoy the sales aspect of my job – 74% of member facing staff and 75% of branch managers could not agree with thisI enjoy the service aspect of my job – 89% of frontline staff agreed with thisI’m motivated by offering the right products and services to members – only 43% agreed with thisThink about the impact of this dynamic and how it would impact your credit union’s ability to execute your game plan. Largely, they have employees who do not like offering or selling products to members. Well, if their “game plan” is to become the PFI for their members, they have people who don’t fit. Conversely, if their game plan is be all about service, they may have the right people fit. At best, the wrong people-fit will restrict your ability to succeed; at worst, it will sabotage all other efforts to become top-of-wallet with your membership.There are various ways to address this issue of “fit” and there are multiple layers to it but here are four quick recommendations as you think about the culture you need to create for optimal success in 2021:Defining your culture fit and role fit is not something defined and executed by the HR exec only. This must be a collaborative process that is strategic in nature (especially the culture piece of it) and needs to be decided and supported by the entire executive/leadership team.When determining the role fit, be sure to recognize the various sales and service roles within your credit union and accept the fact that the primary talents, skills, and competencies are likely distinctly different for each role. (The top quality for a Call Center Rep is different than a Universal Banker, for instance.)Make the future process of recruiting and selection of talent a highly collaborative one. Yes, it is ultimately HR’s responsibility but everyone needs to play a role in making sure you get the right people for your culture and they get into the most appropriate roles.Referring back to the empty-chair metaphor above, be patient in your recruiting and selection process but also be proactive – seek out talent even when you don’t have an immediate need and when you do find the right fit, act swiftly to hire that person.It can be very challenging for most organizations to work through this process of defining your culture and role fits. Politics often get in the way; loud voices influence the final decision; execs can get distracted by chasing purple squirrels. If you need an outside, unbiased facilitator to keep you focused and lead you to a successful completion of this critical process, we can help. Please reach out to www.fi-strategies.com/contact-us. 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Robert Paul Robert has been helping financial institutions drive their retail growth strategies for over 20 years. Paul is the Chief Executive Officer for FI Strategies, LLC, a private consulting company … Web: fi-strategies.com Detailslast_img read more

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West Florida Wins Intense Battle Over Montevallo

first_imgWest Florida Wins Intense Battle Over Montevallo Oct. 27, 2007Box ScorePENSACOLA, Fla. – With eight minutes left in the match Dusty Fouser scored his second goal in his West Florida career, and first this season, lifting No. 3 West Florida (15-1-0, 6-0-0 GSC) to a 3-2 triumph over No.17 Montevallo (15-2-1, 5-1-0 GSC) Friday night at the UWF Sports complex. With the win the Argonauts improve their school record winning streak to 15 and clinched the top seed in next week’s Gulf South Conference Championship.The Falcons cracked the score board first when Glenn Murphy and Nathan Archard connected on a pair of passes setting up Milan Pualic with a shot from the top of the box, which he buried to give Montevallo a 1-0 lead.The Argonauts responded with a pair of goals from Jimmy McHenry and Rafael Segal over the next six minutes to take their first lead of the fixture.Exactly 53 seconds following the Falcons goal Jay Mainville pushed a pass to McHenry from inside the box and the team leader in goals netted his 15th of the season. McHenry now has 39 points this season.Two minutes before the break, Matt Williams sent a cross back post for Segal to control and finish, giving West Florida a 2-1 at the break. In his first season with West Florida Segal has contributed 10 goals and seven assists to the Argonaut attack.Both team continued to apply pressure in the second half and Montevallo has able to even the score in the 60th minute when Parker Ingle nailed a shot from outside the 18-yard box to the upper corner of the net.At the 81:30 mark of the match, Curtis Brashear carried the ball into the corner and drove a cross into the box to a streaking Fouser who headed the game winning goal past the keeper.In the first half the Argonauts out shot the Falcons 9-6, but in the second half Montevallo evened the shot count as they fired up 10 shots to West Florida’s 7, leaving the shot count at 16 a piece for the match.West Florida goal keeper Juan Garcia collected four saves bring his season total to 62. The junior has a goals-against-average of 0.78 this season and it is only the fourth time this season the Argonauts have allowed more then one goal in a match.The Argonauts will have one final match at the UWF Sports Complex this Sunday against Thomas University before beginning post season play. During halftime of the match West Florida athletics will honor the five seniors, Keith Savage, Jimmy McHenry, Nick Mroczkowski, Patrick McLean and Dusty Fouser. “Live Stats” will be available during the match.West Florida will be the top seed in the GSC Championship which will be played at Brosnaham Park. The Argonauts opening match will be against Harding University. West Florida defeated the Bisons 5-0 when they meet earlier this season. Print Friendly Version Sharelast_img read more

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