Knowing where you come from

first_imgAshley’s mom.After writing my first contribution to the Bulldog, I thought about how Momma would react to it. She has dementia and lives in an assisted living facility in Tennessee, but was always sensitive to issues of spending equal time with her family. By the time I came along, when my parents were in their late 30s, most of Momma’s ten siblings had moved away from Wallen Creek in Lee County, VA where she was born and raised. Only a few family members remained in the area including my Grandmother Carroll, my Uncle Wiley and a few cousins. As one of my aunts explained to me, my Grandmother told her daughters that for them to have a better life, they must move away. My memories of the physical place are patchy at best. I remember narrow curvy mountain roads, small rough houses sitting on bare ground and terraced hillsides covered in tobacco and sorghum. From the stories I heard, most folks worked in the coal mines and practiced subsistence farming.In the summers, we would make road trips to visit so Momma could gather with her siblings at a small roadside motel in the nearby town of Jonesville. I can still hear what my Daddy called the Carroll cackle (Carroll is Momma’s maiden name). Momma and her siblings piled up in one of the hotel rooms laughing and telling stories of growing up on Wallen Creek. So many of these stories centered around their memories of watching and helping their mother prepare meals for the family table.She would harvest fresh wild greens known as garden sass or sallet. These greens likely included pokeweed, wood sorrel, sheep sorrel and bittercress. All of these were a nutritious addition to their diet. Grandmother Carroll knew and distinguished these plants at a premature stage of growth; because they should be collected early when they are tender. She knew that if you wait too long to gather them, they become tough and bitter as they get large in size. With these greens she would make something called Kilt (Killed) Salad. It is wilted greens salad with warm bacon drippings in the dressing. This salad can be easily reproduced with ingredients from the grocery store.Kilt SaladKilt SaladIngredients4 slices thick-cut bacon, cut into 1 inch pieces (lardons)2 scallions, white and green parts thinly sliced (she often used meadow onions)4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar6 cups greens (I use romaine and spinach)1 shallot, minced (optional)InstructionsHeat a cast iron skillet over medium heat, then add the bacon and cook until the fat has rendered, about 5 minutes. Put the pieces of bacon on a paper towel-lined plate. Keep the grease in the pan.Turn the heat down to medium low. Add the scallions and shallot. Saute until soft and do the same.Turn the heat to medium and add the vinegar. Stir to combine and scrape any brown bacon bits off the bottom of the pan. Pour the warm mixture over your greens and toss gently, just until slightly wilted. Add salt and pepper to taste.Serve with the bacon crumbles over top and add a fried egg to the top, if you like.NOTE: If you want to punch up the flavor, add a little dijon mustard or a splash of hot sauce to the dressing in the skillet.Saving the rendered fat from cooking bacon is a food tradition I practice today. If you take nothing else away from my cooking advice, SAVE YOUR BACON DRIPPINGS! Good bacon is expensive and the rendered bacon fat is terrific for cooking all kinds of things, so why not make use of the free grease that the bacon gives?After I cook bacon, I pour the drippings that remain in the pan through a fine mesh strainer into a jar I keep in the refrigerator. I strain it to remove any solids that might cause the saved fat to go rancid & I store it in the refrigerator to extend the shelf life. Bacon grease has a smoke point of 400F, so it is great for sautéing, pan-frying or roasting. If you combine it with canola or vegetable oil, you can raise that smoke point for recipes that require higher heat. The next time you are frying an egg or making biscuits, use some bacon grease instead of butter or other fat and don’t tell me they don’t taste better!Ashley Montgomery is a native Southerner with a deep love for collard greens, hot buttered biscuits and sweet tea. She married a boy from Maine, works at UMF and calls Wilton her home. She loves cooking, feeding people, learning about other folk’s food traditions and will eventually stop being afraid of pressure cookers.last_img read more

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Gifford holds 105th Annual Meeting, $27,000 in awards given

first_img*** Gifford Healthcare,Gifford’s Best Kept Secrets’ was the theme of the Randolph hospital’s 105th Annual Meeting of the Corporators held Saturday evening at Gifford. It is also the theme of the medical center’s 2010 year-in-review Annual Report.The report and meeting described the hospital’s efforts around cancer, surgical and emergency care. Talked about were little known programs like the Gifford Adult Day Program in Bethel and inpatient rehabilitation in Randolph, and the availability of high-tech diagnostic imaging.‘‘I didn’t know Gifford did that.’‘ It’s a statement hospital staff and leaders hear regularly, hospital Administrator Joseph Woodin told corporators filling Gifford’s Conference Center. ‘So we put it in the Annual Report. I hope you read it and get the word out.’Also described were the hospital’s 11 consecutive years making its budget and operating margin.‘Our goal has always been an operating margin of 2.5 to 3 percent,’ said Woodin.Others have seen their budget dollars and operating margins swing wildly from highs to lows. Showing Gifford’s financial stability over the past decade, and thus modest but consistent investment, Woodin noted, ‘We actually do work quite differently than other organizations.’Part of its success is due to its planning efforts. The medical center is amid its fourth consecutive three-year strategic plan.‘What does the community need? What do our patients need? What does the hospital need?’ Woodin said the planning process asks and addresses.The current plan aims to make Gifford a medical center of choice for patients, staff and health providers by addressing quality, relationship building and teamwork. Long-term facility planning is another important component, but temporarily on hold due to looming health care reform and budget cuts in Montpelier.Woodin called Vermont a leader in the nation when it came to health care and showed a chart from the Commonwealth Foundation, an independent, non-profit research institute, ranking Vermont top in the United States when it comes to health care.‘In Vermont, we do very well. We’re currently the standard,’ said Woodin, who has testified before the Senate Finance Committee on health care reform. ‘My caution to the politicians is that we’re not trying to go from a C or D grade. We already have an A.’Rather than complete reform, or slashing budget cuts, Woodin proposed cost saving ideas that could be implemented now to reduce health care costs statewide. Not duplicating X-rays or other studies as patients move between community and tertiary care hospitals was one example. Limiting health care advertising was another. A third addressed the hospital budgeting process and savings that could be realized from a two-year budget cycle.Health care reform has been, and will continue to be, a discussion at all hospital Board of Trustees meetings, Chairman Bob Wright said, describing the active board’s monthly meetings and participation in committees. ‘It’s a well-informed board,’ he said, calling Gifford an ‘affective’ and ‘conscientious team.’‘Gifford’s pretty special. I’ve heard this from many different sources and in many different circumstances,’ said Wright.ElectionsWelcomed to that active board was Lincoln Clark of Royalton, a past board member. Clark replaces former Vermont Technical College president Ty Handy who has moved to Florida. Corporators were unanimous in their support for Clark.Also unanimously supported were new corporator members Rod and Marilen Tilt, John and Ruth Lutz, Mona Colton, Carol Bushey and Mike Ross.Awards and scholarshipsA host of awards and scholarships were also announced.Betina Barrett-Gallant, a Gifford employee and daughter of the late Dr. Richard Barrett, named Stockbridge resident and operating room nurse Fern Rogers the winner of this year’s $1,000 Dr. Richard J. Barrett Health Professions Scholarship.The award is given annually by the Medical Staff to an employee or employee’s child pursuing a health career. Rogers is pursuing her registered nurse degree at Vermont Technical College.The Philip D. Levesque Memorial Community Award is given annually to a White River Valley organization involved in the arts, health, community development, education or the environment. Levesque was Gifford’s president and chief executive officer from 1973-1994.This year’s winner of the Levesque award is the Granville Volunteer Fire Department, family physician Dr. Ken Borie announced. The volunteer fire department will use the funds to buy medical equipment to help launch a first response team to medical emergencies in Granville, Hancock and the surrounding area as necessary.And William and Mary Markle Community Foundation grants amounting to nearly $25,000 were given to 14 area organizations, including several food shelves and many children’s recreation programs.This year’s winners, announced Development, Marketing and Public Relations Director Ashley Lincoln, were:â ¢ Bethel Food Shelf ‘ $1,490 to purchase a refrigerator and freezer⠢⠢ Cabot Recreation Dept. ‘ $1,500 for snowshoes and soccer goals⠢⠢ Chelsea Little League Baseball ‘ $1,580 for a pitching machine and pitchers’ screen⠢⠢ Chelsea Recreation Association ‘ $2,000 for summer camp swimming lessons⠢⠢ Gifford Family Center ‘ $1,800 for family educational workshops⠢⠢ Gifford Pharmacy Department ‘ $2,718 for ‘Cactus Smart Sinks’ for the safer disposal of medications⠢⠢ Green Mountain United Way ‘ $1,200 for its Building Healthy Communities activity program⠢⠢ Randolph Area Food Shelf ‘ $2,500 toward its building relocation and renovations⠢⠢ Randolph Elementary School ‘ $1,500 for an industrial-grade food processor for the Farm to School Program⠢⠢ Randolph Village Fire Dept. ‘ $750 for a gas detector for a new pumper truck⠢⠢ Randolph Wrestling Club ‘ $1,500 to create a nonprofit club and program support⠢⠢ Randolph Youth Basketball ‘ $1,575 for a score clock and other program supports⠢⠢ Rochester Public Library ‘ $2,000 in matching dollars toward the purchase of an elevator⠢⠢ South Royalton Community Food Shelf ‘ $2,495 for a freezerâ ¢Formally the Gifford Community Health Grant Program, the grants were renamed for the late Bill Markle and his wife Mary in 2009. Bill Markle had been a former board member and long-time supporter of Gifford. Mary Markle was in attendance, along with about 90 others, at this year’s Annual Meeting when the grants were announced.Gifford has been offering the annual grants to community non-profits for 10 years, amounting to nearly $250,000 given to the community in the last decade, Lincoln noted.Special presentationThe meeting concluded with a special presentation from Gifford’s Surgery Division leaders ‘ Medical Director and general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli, Vice President of Surgery Rebecca O’Berry and nurse manager Jamie Floyd.The trio described the breadth of surgical and specialty services at Gifford, including podiatry, urology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, general surgery, anesthesia, neurology and pain management.‘We’re very unique. Many hospitals of larger size don’t have this amenity,’ Dr. Ciccarelli said of the pain management care provided by specialist Dr. Lan Knoff.O’Berry said that was the beauty of Gifford.‘We never think of ourselves as a small institution. We look at ‘What does the community need?’‘ she said.Urology is an example. There are only 400 urologist in all of the United States and Canada. Gifford currently has two working part-time as well as a full-time, experienced urology physician assistant. And the medical center just recruited a third provider, Dr. Richard Graham, who is slated to start in May.Gifford also offers some specialties in multiple locations for the convenience of patients, including urology, which is in Randolph and White River Junction. Podiatry is in three locations ‘ Berlin, Randolph and Sharon.Specific services were also described along with technology and quality improvements.Floyd called cataract surgery ‘ a simple, quick and needle-free procedure ‘ one of the most ‘life altering’ surgeries. ‘It’s really amazing to walk into an OR with someone who can’t see and to walk out 20 minutes later with someone with nearly 20/20 vision,’ he said.New technology included updated sterilization machines, a new ‘mini c-arm’ for use by primarily Gifford’s podiatrists to get an image or continuous live view of a joint during surgery.Thanks to the generosity of a donor, who gave the hospital $200,000 to purchase a stereotactic breast biopsy system, the hospital will soon add this technology. Stereotactic breast biopsies are less invasive than surgical options and especially beneficial for women with an abnormality near the chest wall.Quality improvements have included a move toward a latex-free operating room, a surgical safety checklist and patient survey, and even new clocks ‘ a small but meaningful change.Previously, clock times varied by several minutes one way or the other. A patient could leave the operating room at say 11:26 a.m. and ‘ remarkably ‘ arrive in recovery suite at 11:24 a.m. Or, they could leave operating room at 11:26 a.m. and not arrive in the recovery suite ‘ just a short distance away ‘ until quite a few minutes later.The new clocks are linked to a central radio transmitter, meaning each reads the same time and patient charts reflect these accurate, consistent times.Source: Gifford www.giffordmed.org(link is external). Photos Gifford Medical Center Administrator Joseph Woodin speaks at Saturday’s 105th Annual Meeting of the Gifford Corporators ‘ a citizen body that helps oversee the hospital, serves as community liaisons and committee members, and elects the Board of Trustees.Kitchen and maintenance teams.Surgery Division Medical Director and general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli describes the vast array of surgery and specialty services available at Gifford.Podiatrist Dr. Paul Smith uses the ‘mini C-arm’ during surgery.last_img read more

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Activation of air traffic is crucial for the recovery of tourism, and three prerequisites are needed for this

first_imgIn line with the aforementioned efforts of IATA, a member of the U.S. Senate for Trade, Science and Transportation, Mary Cantwell from Washington and Senator Rick scott from Florida, presented a bill proposing that U.S. Traffic Safety Administration (TSA) conducts temperature checks at existing airport control points in order to increase the safety of passenger air traffic in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. What is crucial is to standardize all protocols at the global level, in order to bridge the problem that each country has its own different rules and not to depend on the measures of individual countries. Because unbalanced and constant changes in measures lead to the impossibility of travel planning, and as we know air transport is crucial for the tourism sector. It would be testing at airports that would allow airlines to operate relatively normally. It is estimated that since the outbreak of the pandemic, profits of $ 400 billion have been lost so far, and the entire industry could make a record net loss of over $ 2020 billion in 80 (an optimistic scenario). You can see more information about the Council’s Aviation Recovery Task Force (CART) protocols HERE With rapid tests as well as non-contact temperature measurement technologies, things would improve significantly and gain the confidence of both passengers and the state to open borders. These are the challenges and preconditions that must be met, in order to re-actualize global tourist travel, despite the coronavirus. / / / THE QUESTION THAT EVERYONE IS ASKING: WHAT WILL THE NEXT TOURIST YEAR BE LIKE? HERE ARE SOME LOUD THINKINGS Airport temperature checks would be carried out using innovative, contactless technologies thermal cameras capable of automatically viewing a large number of passengers passing through existing TSA checkpoints. It is simple and non-invasive, and such systems have already been shown to be effective in identifying infected individuals and mitigating the spread of COVID-19 in other countries. International passenger air traffic fell by 92% compared to last year. To conclude. Thus, by using innovative, contactless thermal camera technology, it is possible to automatically view a large number of passengers, without contact and creating crowds. Photo: Negative Space The economic collapse that threatens the aviation industry, on which more than 66 million jobs worldwide depend, must not be left to fend for itself because there is a danger of a chain of airlines collapsing before the global pandemic ends, de Juniac said, adding that the resulting loss disruption of global connectivity makes investing in airport testing justified and a priority. Cover photo: Skitterphoto In addition to opening borders, public opinion research has also shown that testing will help restore passengers’ confidence in aviation, which is again crucial, ie the perception of safety. – The key to restoring freedom of cross-border mobility is to systematically test all passengers for COVID-19 before traveling. This will give governments around the world the confidence to open their borders, which would be a great substitute for current self-isolation or quarantine measures. Testing all passengers will give people back their freedom of movement by air, and millions would return to work in the aviation industry because of such a decision, said Alexandre de Juniac, Director General of IATA.center_img Respondents in the survey identified the implementation of COVID-19 protection measures for all passengers as an effective measure in achieving safety. The availability of rapid testing on COVID-19 is what gives passengers the most safety. On the other hand, the big problem is that on test results on covid19 waited too long. However, intensive work is being done in this field as well, and several companies around the world have announced that they are working or have already developed rapid tests for coronavirus, thanks to which test results are obtained within 30 seconds.  Thus, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) called for the development and implementation of fast, accurate, affordable and systematic testing on COVID-19 for all passengers before traveling as an alternative to quarantine. IATA is thus cooperating with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and with the health authorities in order to implement this solution as soon as possible in airports around the world, reports Croatian Aviation. Thus, 88% of respondents are ready to take the test as part of the travel process, while 88% of respondents are ready to take the test as part of the travel process. – IATA Quick testing i temperature measurement – as key challenges – As our economy reopens and Americans begin to travel more, we must do everything we can to make travel safe. ”said the senator Rick scott and added that consumer protection must also be ensured against unfair airline pricing tactics. “This law will make it possible to check the temperature, while at the same time ensuring the flexibility of airlines with customers who get sick after buying a flight. If passengers are not allowed to fly due to fever, airlines will need to work with the client to transfer or cancel the flight free of charge.”Scott points out. IATA’s opinion poll revealed support for testing for COVID-19 in the air travel process. Approximately 65% ​​of passengers surveyed agreed that quarantine should not be required if a person is tested for COVID-19 and has a negative result. 84% of respondents agreed that testing should be mandatory for all passengers, Photo: JJ Jordan I recently wrote that globally the tourism sector at the time of the coronavirus pandemic, has two big challenges which must be resolved in order to attempt to return confidence global travelers, which are: rapid testing i temperature measurement at the entrance of both the state and the destination.  Activation of air traffic is key to the recovery of tourism, and they are needed for that three key prerequisites: Standardization of security protocols in airports and airlines, fast testing, ie fast obtaining of test results, and contactless thermal camera technology capable of automatically screening a large number of passengers. – Safety is the highest priority of aviation. We are the safest form of transport because we work together with governments to implement global standards. With the costs associated with daily border closures and the emergence of a second wave of contagion, the aviation industry needs to bring all parties together and find a solution, and that is testing each passenger. It must be fast, accurate and simple. This will certainly allow the market to recover, adds de Juniac. For the right start and a new impetus for global tourism, it is crucial to start international air transport. It is on this topic that the global scene is intensively discussed and guidelines and protocols are proposed for the creation of security protocols, both when boarding planes and in airports in general. last_img read more

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Shafer arrives in Chicago for NCAA investigation, per report

first_imgSyracuse head football coach Scott Shafer joined a contingent of Syracuse officials in Chicago on Thursday morning for a hearing on potential NCAA violations committed by the university, according to a report by The Post-Standard.The hearing, which will play out over Thursday and Friday, will determine whether or not SU violated NCAA rules and a ruling is expected within 30-60 days. The Syracuse football and men’s basketball teams are under investigation, according to multiple reports.Current and former Syracuse officials have been interviewed about issues in academics, benefits to athletes and drug policy failures, according to The Post-Standard.SU basketball head coach Jim Boeheim and his associate head coach Mike Hopkins were also invited to the hearing as were at least four former employees of SU’s academic support system for athletes, according to The Post-Standard. Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford confirmed at Wednesday’s men’s basketball media day that the conference would be sending a representative to the hearing.Shafer entered the Chicago Hilton at around 8:45 a.m., according to The Post-Standard. His weekly Thursday press conference in Manley Field House’s Iocolano-Petty Football Wing auditorium was rescheduled from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 8:11 a.m. on Thursday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU’s senior vice president for public affairs, Kevin Quinn, was also seen at the hotel, according to The Post-Standard. Published on October 30, 2014 at 10:49 am Contact Jacob: [email protected] | @Jacob_Klinger_ Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more

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