Adam Jones & Boston racism at Fenway Park

first_imgBy mYia X & Phebe EckfeldtBostonIn April, Major League Baseball celebrated the 70th anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier. However, on May 2, Baltimore Orioles player Adam Jones was on the receiving end of racist attacks by Red Sox fans at Fenway Park.Jones stated that “a disrespectful person threw a bag of peanuts at me and I got called the N-word a handful of times. … It’s unfortunate that people need to resort to those types of epithets to degrade another human being. I’m trying to make a living for myself and for my family.” (USA Today, May 2)Once this attack was revealed, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh tweeted, “This is unacceptable” and “Not who we are as a city. These words and actions have no place in Fenway, Boston, or anywhere.”Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker called it “shameful.” And during a press conference, Jones stated that John Henry, principal owner of the Red Sox, met with him in person.New York Yankees pitcher C.C. Sabathia revealed that the only place he’s ever been attacked with racial slurs was in Boston. Sabathia added, “[T]here’s 62 of us. We all know. When you go to Boston, expect it.” (www.si.com, May 5)In solidarity with Jones, Red Sox pitcher David Price discussed various racist incidents he has endured from fans at Fenway.On May 3, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred issued a public statement that read in part: “The racist words and actions directed at Jones at Fenway Park last night are completely unacceptable and will not be tolerated at any of our ballparks.“Jones returned to Fenway Park on May 3 to a standing ovation. However, moments later, Calvin Hennick, a Boston Globe writer who is white, confronted a racist Red Sox fan publicly attacking an unnamed Kenyan singer performing the national anthem.When confronted by Hennick about the attack, the fan reportedly said, “Yeah, that’s what I said, and I stand by it.” (bet.com, May 4) The racist fan was eventually banned.The norm, not the exceptionThese attacks are not isolated incidents of a few people behaving “badly.” They are indicative of structural and institutionalized racism that permeates Boston sports arenas.On May 1, 2014, P.K. Subban, a Black National Hockey League player for the Montreal Canadiens, was viciously attacked on Twitter by racist fans of the Boston Bruins. The online attack resulted in the N-word becoming a top trending topic. Columnist Rosie Dimanno stated in response, “If you’re black-skinned, you have to be thick-skinned.” (thestar.com, May 2)Robert Traynham, a 1950s star player in the Negro Leagues, told Workers World, “When the Negro Leagues were broken up into clubs in the late 1950s, most of the major league teams began shunning Black players. The Red Sox were the last team to integrate. Tom Yawkey, the Red Sox owner at the time, owned a plantation in South Carolina. He did not want Blacks playing on the team and turned down Jackie Robinson, saying that even HE was not good enough!”When racism is woven into the historic fabric of a city, how can the attack on Adam Jones be an isolated incident? In the early 1970s busing for desegregation in Boston was court-ordered. Buses carrying Black school children were stoned daily by screaming, racist, white mobs. Black families’ homes in predominantly white neighborhoods were set on fire and vandalized. Reports of people of color being beaten and abused while walking after games in the vicinity of Fenway Park were common. A Black man walking across City Hall Plaza in downtown Boston had his nose broken by racist thugs wielding a U.S. flag.The march of 25,000 in Boston in 1974 to say NO to racism, which WWP was instrumental in organizing, stemmed the tide of this racist onslaught.Racism is alive and well in Boston — from attacks on Black students at Boston Latin School, the country’s first public school, to the ongoing “stop and frisk” policing of Black and Brown youth, and the increased disenfranchisement of communities of color through gentrification, attacks on public education, and cuts to social programs, etc.The rise of Trumpism emboldens diabolical racist elements all across the U.S. Banning an individual from Fenway Park will NOT eradicate racism from Fenway Park or anywhere else. Only an united mass struggle will.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Illinois man arrested after pursuit in LaPorte County

first_imgIndianaLocalNews Twitter By Jon Zimney – March 8, 2021 0 242 Facebook Pinterest Google+ Previous articleRokita threatens to sue if HR1 voting reform bill becomes lawNext articleCDC announces new guidelines for the fully vaccinated Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Illinois man arrested after pursuit in LaPorte County Google+ Twitter WhatsApp (Photo supplied/LaPorte County Jail) An Illinois man has been arrested after leading police on chase in LaPorte CountyIt was around 10 a.m. Friday morning, when investigators stopped a vehicle at U.S. 20 and Range Road, for following too closely.‘The driver got out of the vehicle when police asked her to and that’s when the passenger, Martin Devalois, 37, of Braidwood, Illinois, rolled up the windows, locked the doors, then climbed into the driver’s seat and sped off, according to police, as reported by our news partners at ABC 57. Sheriff’s deputies followed.The chase came to an end when Devalois hit a snowbank at a dead end near State Road 39 and Pennsylvania Avenue.last_img read more

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Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Shares Soundboard From Sold-Out Performance In Maine [Listen]

first_imgWith a number of shows on the calendar, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead has been thoroughly building the anticipation by sharing recordings from the earlier parts of 2016. The newest edition of their “Taper Tuesday” series was released today, chronicling the band’s performance in Portland, ME. On February 13th, Almost Dead hit the State Theatre and kept fans warm with a barn-burning concert, paying tribute to the Grateful Dead in style.The band opened with their first electric version of “Big River,” and kept things going with hits like “Sitting On Top Of The World,” “Viola Lee Blues,” “Sugaree” and so many more! There’s also a jam on Miles Davis’s “So What,” teases of Led Zeppelin and Tears for Fears, and a great “Terrapin Suite” to close out the second set. It’s prime Almost Dead jamming!Thanks to Eric McRoberts and Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, we can listen to this show in full below.Don’t miss the exciting Evolution Of Jam Vol. 2 tribute show taking place following Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s return to the Brooklyn Bowl this Saturday, October 7th. With tributes to the Grateful Dead, Phish, and Disco Biscuits lined up, expect some non-stop late night grooves. Tickets can be found here.The fully annotated from band manager Peter Costello can also be seen below.Setlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead at State Theatre, Portland, ME – 2/13/16Set 1:01. Jam ->02. Big River @ (SM) ->03. Sitting On Top Of The World (TH) ->04. Viola Lee Blues (All) ->05. Sugaree (TH) ->06. Viola Lee Blues Reprise (All) >07. Deal (TH)Set 2:01. Here Comes Sunshine (TH) ->02. So What Jam # ->03. Here Comes Sunshine Reprise (TH) ->04. Women Are Smarter $ (SM) ->05. Slipknot Jam & ->06. Franklin’s Tower (TH) ->07. Throwing Stones (SM) ->08. Space ->09. Throwing Stones Reprise % (SM) ->10. Terrapin Station Suite ^ (TH)Encore:11. One More Saturday Night (SM)@ – First Almost Dead Electric Version# – Miles Davis original$ – With a GDTRFB Tease (TH)& – Played very fast% – With a tease of some Led Zeppelin song (SM) that neither Scott nor I can remember today.^ – With an “Everybody Wants to Rule The World” (Tears For Fears) Tease (Band)Joe Russo – Drums, VocalsTom Hamilton – Guitar, VocalsScott Metzger – Guitar, VocalsMarco Benevento – Keyboards, VocalsJon Shaw – Bass (Dave was on Ween tour)last_img read more

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Smaller UK schemes struggling to close funding gap: Goldman Sachs

first_imgImprovements in UK defined benefit (DB) scheme funding have masked challenges facing smaller pension funds, according to Goldman Sachs Asset Management (GSAM).The fund manager reviewed DB schemes attached to the UK’s largest 350 listed companies and found that smaller schemes – those with less than £500m (€557m) in assets – tended to experience more volatility regarding their funding position.Schemes with less than £100m had a funding level on average 15% lower than those with £5bn or more, GSAM reported.The group said the data reflected small schemes “have not managed their risk exposures as effectively as larger schemes, likely due to a lower degree of governance”. Larger schemes have adopted liability-driven investment strategies, diversified their portfolios and implemented currency hedges, GSAM added. However, these strategies were increasingly available to small schemes, the asset manager said.David Curtis, head of UK and Irish institutional business at GSAM, said: “While the funding rate of smaller pension schemes improved this year, we see much greater volatility in their funding position than larger schemes who have consistently improved their funding level every year of the four years we have run our FTSE 350 study in the UK.“This highlights that larger schemes better implement risk management strategies that protect and advance pension scheme solvency consistently.”Although limited to FTSE 350 companies, the study had implications across the UK’s pension system GSAM said, as roughly 87% of private sector schemes had less than £500m in assets.Overall, UK schemes have experienced a positive year in terms of aggregate funding positions. Multiple estimates have reported that assets have grown faster than liabilities during 2018, with FTSE 100-listed companies hitting 100% funding for their DB schemes earlier this year.However, Shoqat Bunglawala, head of GSAM’s global portfolio solutions group, warned that risks were rising. “In the next year alone, schemes are likely going to have to navigate higher interest rates in some markets, continued conflicts around trade, Italian budget negotiations and other macroeconomic risks that come with being in the late stages of the economic cycle,” he said.“UK schemes in particular will be faced with their own challenges including the outcome of Brexit, potentially increasing interest rates and a volatile currency. In this environment, we think an enhanced focus on risk mitigation and a dynamic approach to asset allocation will prove invaluable.”  Source: JLT, Mercer, PPFlast_img read more

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