House of Deputies president: ‘be bold and visionary disciples of…

first_imgHouse of Deputies president: ‘be bold and visionary disciples of Jesus’ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Oct 16, 2012 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Executive Council, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (3) Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs President of the House of Deputies Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Featured Events Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel October 17, 2012 at 1:23 am I think whatever it is it is very exciting. Just got home from EfM class so to read your message makes it all the more anticipatory, one day at a time. Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem October 16, 2012 at 5:31 pm Now that’s bold and visionary leadership. May The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings’s words be embraced and realized by our beloved Episcopal Church. Here’s to “the something else triennium.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Lance Woodruff says: October 16, 2012 at 8:31 pm President Jennings was indeed ‘something else’ when she met Bishop Cole at age 23. Her evoking the unfolding of the Episcopal Church witnesses to both the tensions and the promise of taking bold steps, action, in faith. Calling to mind Presiding Bishop John Hines charge to the 62nd General Convention in 1967 to do ‘something else’, to ‘humbly and boldly’ walk and act with ‘the dispossessed and oppressed peoples of this country for the healing of our national life’ speaks to our present national situation. May it be that we have both faith and courage in the days ahead. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] “Let’s be bold and visionary disciples of Jesus,” the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, President of the House of Deputies, said in her sermon at the noon Chapel service at the Episcopal Church Center during the meeting of the Executive Council.The Executive Council, meeting in New Brunswick, New Jersey (Diocese of New Jersey), visited the Church Center in New York City on October 16.The following is the text of President Jennings’ sermon:SOMETHING ELSEOctober 16, 2012Meeting of Executive Council at the Episcopal Church CenterThe Rev. Gay Clark JenningsPresident of the House of DeputiesI was a young woman of 23 when I went to see the Bishop of Central New York to tell him I was going to seminary. It was August of 1974 and I had already been accepted at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. I was going on my own self-devised trial year, but the rector of my parish said I had to go to let the bishop know of my plans. So I met with Bishop Ned Cole, who looked like Methuselah, and I told him what I was doing.I met with the bishop two weeks after the Philadelphia 11 were ordained, one of whom was resident in Central New York. Bishop Cole, although he was in favor of the ordination of women, was not amused.He said, “Young lady, why exactly are you here? What do you want from me?” I responded, “I came because my rector told me I had to come see you. And so here I am. And I don’t want anything from you. ” He replied, “You are the first person in a long time to come to see me who didn’t want anything from me.”He then looked at me over the bridge of his bifocals, and asked me a question that I somehow knew was important to him. He asked, “Gay, what will you do if you aren’t ordained?”I looked him square in the eye and said without hesitation, “Something else!” He burst out laughing and told me he hoped that he would be the first to know if I decided I wanted to be ordained.  I didn’t tell him that I was still a member of the Presbyterian Church; that seemed irrelevant since I had been attending the Episcopal Church off and on for two years when I was home from college. But that’s another story.General Convention adjourned just three months ago. This is the first meeting of Executive Council. The new triennium begins in just a few months, but we are in many ways acting as if it has already begun. The staff is already in high gear. Most appointments have been made, and many of the committees, commissions, and board will have a joint meeting next month in St. Louis.Hopes and expectations are high. People are longing for something new and brilliant and real. People are counting on the Structure Task Force to propose new ways of being the Episcopal Church in order to deepen our commitment to Jesus and strengthen our capacity for mission.Three years is a long time to wait for a report, and there is no reason why we can’t begin reforming and renewing and refreshing not only our structures, but our very lives, to be witnesses to the living God who created us, who sent his beloved Son to redeem us, and guides and consoles and cajoles us through the Holy Spirit.  Given all this, I propose we might think of the next three years as the “Something Else Triennium.”At every level of the Episcopal Church – individual, congregational, diocesan, provincial, and churchwide – we can look at how we live our lives and structure our communities and ministries and consider if we could do something else. Something else that might just bring us closer to the heart of God and those we are called to serve – the last, the least, the lost, and the left behind.Today we remember in our church calendar Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley, bishops who were martyred in 1555 for their beliefs about the need for reform in the Church. Bishops, take note! They lived lives guided by the notion of “something else,” and that’s exactly why we remember them 457 years later.Hugh Latimer was the Bishop of Worcester. He gave up his episcopacy because he believed King Henry VIII was impeding the progress of the Reformation by enacting reactionary royal policies. Latimer never resumed his see, and was later executed during the reign of Queen Mary (who incidentally sought protection and was besieged while hiding in my family’s ancestral castle south of Edinburgh). That’s also is another story.Nicholas Ridley was the Bishop of Rochester. He aligned himself with Archbishop Thomas Cranmer’s ideas to reform the Church and he worked with Cranmer in the development of the first Book of Common Prayer. He later became the Bishop of London where he continued to advocate for and implement the principles of the Reformation. With Latimer, he was executed when Mary became queen.They gave their lives for holding strong to a vision of something else – that the Church could be something else – something else that would bring ecclesiastical structures and governance more and more into the service of God’s mission. While you and I won’t be called upon to give up our physical lives for the cause of structural reform, we have given our lives to Jesus Christ and committed to serve God’s Church.  This is always the first step.Because the 65th General Convention in 1976 made the canons governing ordination equally applicable to men and women, I have served the Episcopal Church as an ordained person for nearly 35 years. The Church we all love did “something else” when it passed that canon.Our Church did “something else” when it stated at its informal Convention meeting in Philadelphia in 1784 that “to make canons there be no other authority than a representative body of clergy and laity conjointly.” Bishops arrived on the scene, and the bicameral gatherings we know as General Convention were formalized by the Constitution adopted by the General Convention in 1789. Shared decision-making and distributed authority has been characteristic of the governance of our Church for the 223 years since.At the 62nd General Convention held in Seattle in 1967, Presiding Bishop John Hines called the Episcopal Church to do something else; specifically “to take its place humbly and boldly alongside of, and in support of, the dispossessed and oppressed peoples of this country for the healing of our national life.” General Convention adopted what was called the Special Program, and allocated $9 million to be spent during the 1968-1970 triennium specifically to address poverty and racism. It was a radical move not greeted warmly by some Episcopalians.The Episcopal Church did something else when it decided to embrace the full inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered Episcopalians at all levels of the Church’s governance and ministry.  Bishop Browning’s clarion call that there will be no outcasts has reverberated throughout the Church in a variety of ways ever since, and we are moving ever closer to full inclusion.What will “something else” look like in this triennium?  We don’t know yet, but I am ready and willing to be part of creating something else, something new. I believe you are as well. Let’s go there. Let’s be bold and visionary disciples of Jesus. We are called to do no less.Amen. The Very Rev. Tracey Lind says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Vivian Varela says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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To succeed at digital transformation, make application security a priority

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Greg Crandell Greg Crandell provides strategy, market planning, business development, and management consulting to financial technology firms and their clients – Credit Unions and Banks. For more years than he wishes to admit, … Web: queryconsultinggroup.com Details WFH initiatives heighten security concernsAs discussed in the article “Is Digital Transformation a Victim of Covid-19” the “Covid-19 pandemic is putting growing pressure on organizations to expand their digital transformation efforts to include work from home (“WFH”) processes to allow for continued operations in a “social distancing” environment.”As well, “WFH means many more endpoints and many more inadequately secured network access points (“endpoints”). With the use of video conferencing tools like Zoom, Microsoft Teams, and Google Meet growing, and with the use of less secure network connections growing,  there are security implications that CISOs are rushing to address — especially for these remote employees; because an increase in collaboration application usage, and remote access, means a larger attack surface for threat actors to target.”Digital transformation demands better endpoint securityHowever, it’s not just the security response to COVID-19’s impact on daily business with which we should concern ourselves. Credit unions’ digital transformation efforts (designed to tap the power of mobile, internet of things (IoT) and other edge technology to improve business results) are also rapidly expanding the threat vector within which security people must contend. And if we don’t successfully address the security issues generated by digital expansion, our efforts to transform will suffer, maybe implode.The endpoint revolutionDigital transformation is driven, in part, by the dramatic increase in computing power built into endpoint devices such as tablets, smartphones, laptops, IoT sensors, operational technology (e.g. transformers) and other endpoints. To optimize digital initiatives, we are pushing computing outward from centralized or cloud-based servers to these endpoints, to leverage their growing capability and to empower our end users. It’s true that many critical enterprise assets and resources remain behind your credit union’s network firewalls; but access to these resources is needed for endpoint applications and devices to deliver on their promise to end users – employees, members and more.More endpoints, more risks, more lossesAs described by John Aisien, CEO of Blue Cedar, “the growing number of devices and applications presents significant security challenges. Cybercriminals understand well the growing number and power of endpoint devices, and their vulnerabilities. Attackers are exploiting weaknesses in devices, apps, networks, back-end servers and other assets, even gaining access to corporate IT resources or bringing down systems and halting business.” Malware, hacks and data or infrastructure breaches are derailing digital initiatives, violating customer and user privacy, exposing enterprise assets and undermining brand trust.Mr. Aisien tells us “to mitigate these risks, enterprises are fighting back by implementing access controls, user authentication, device status monitoring, data protection and other security measures but, in the face of these actions and investments in security solutions and services, malicious malware attacks continue to grow and continue to do significant damage.” And financial services organizations lead the way in the size and severity of attacks directed at them, with more to come. If all the work being done and dollars being spent isn’t successfully securing our endpoints and protecting our investments in our digital transformation initiatives, what are we to do?To secure the endpoint, one must secure the application running on it“The true security perimeter is actually enforced by each application running on an endpoint,” according to TJ Tajalli, CEO at OnSystem Logic. And it is within “each application’s memory, including those applications implementing the various functions of all modern operating systems of today, where data is manipulated as directed by the application’s instructions inside its memory.”     The credit union technology leaders I’ve spoken with would agree when Mr. Tajalli says “today’s endpoint security defenses have been built around observation and potential enforcement of visible operations OUTSIDE of the applications. This is true regardless of the technology being used by state-of-the-art endpoint security products. However, ALL attacks, including ransomware, data theft, data modifications, endpoint software and data destruction, etc., run inside known applications or benign looking applications without being noticed by current endpoint security products — until it is too late.”  All of this leads to the conclusion that “despite billions of dollars spent on endpoint security the endpoints are truly not safer than before.”App-centric security is the forward step we must takeGiven the growth of both managed and unmanaged endpoints, including bring-your-own-device (“BYOD”) scenarios, credit unions must look beyond current endpoint security solutions.  Not only are these solutions failing to provide the “certainty” needed by our organizations as we work to digitally transform them, but these solutions too often impact negatively the end user experience we fight so hard to improve.Unfortunately for all of us, it appears current endpoint security products have largely given up on trying to stop the execution of unwanted code and have instead moved toward POTENTIALLY detecting and responding, but only after the damage has been done. None of us should accept this as the best that we can buy or the best that we can deploy.How to deploy app-centric securityI have come to understand that in most applications, there are operations that have a security impact on the application. One such operation that impacts all applications is the ability to change its data into executable code. Most applications don’t use this operation; however, it is the most destructive and effective method attackers use to take full control of applications. Controlling self-modification is the first and most important universal problem that must be solved. Another example of an important universal operation to control is the ability of the application to create and/or manipulate other processes. In addition to the universally important operations to control, selecting other operations to control is based on the functionality of an application. For example, a database server’s critical operations include directly manipulating backend data files, its privilege implementation mechanism, etc. In practice, important security operations are seldom used within an application. Learning which part of an application uses those operations during its normal operation is what is required. So, this is doable. In fact, it’s being done. There are firms pursuing and delivering solutions to this problem. They need our attention. And if we are going to succeed at digital transformation, we need their solutions. If you agree and have ideas to share or questions to ask, feel free to ask me.last_img read more

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Arsenal scouts to watch transfer target Dominik Szoboszlai in action against Liverpool

first_imgAdvertisement Szoboszlai is attracting interest from Arsenal (Picture: Reuters)Arsenal scouts will watch Dominik Szoboszlai in action for Red Bull Salzburg when they take on Liverpool in the Champions League, reports say.Salzburg travel to Anfield on Wednesday night looking to preserve their 100 per cent record in the group stages against the reigning champions.Arsenal have been tracking Szoboszlai since the start of the year and the Mirror claim the Gunners will have scouts to see the young Austrian play against Liverpool.Szoboszlai, 18, is one of Salzburg’s star players alongside Erling Haaland, who has also been linked with a move to the Premier League.ADVERTISEMENT Arsenal scouts to watch transfer target Dominik Szoboszlai in action against Liverpool Liverpool welcome Szoboszlai and Salzburg to Anfield on Wednesday (Picture: Getty)Arsenal reportedly made an approach for Szoboszlai last summer and have asked to kept informed should any sides make a move to secure his services.AdvertisementAdvertisementWhile Unai Emery continues to keep tabs on Szoboszlai, Liverpool have two former Salzburg players in the ranks.Sadio Mane and Naby Keita both spent time with the club and the former praised Salzburg’s young stars.‘They have a good team and the boys are always hungry to get better and better. In a few years they can become great players,’ he said. Commentcenter_img Coral BarryWednesday 2 Oct 2019 9:44 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link329Shares Advertisement Szoboszlai and Haaland are tipped for big moves (Picture: Reuters)‘Of course it’s a special game for me. I was playing there for two-and-a-half years and now I’m going to play against them.‘They will be ready for me and I will be ready for them as well. I love the city and the club – before and still now.‘I will be really happy to meet my ex-teammates. But at the same time, I would love to win against them.MORE: Arsenal hero Ray Parlour predicts Mesut Ozil transfer exit after Manchester United snubMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man Citylast_img read more

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