With Anti-Bullying Program, Local Woman Makes it Cool to be Kind

first_imgBy Tim KellyKindness is a choice. It can also be the cool choice for kids.That’s the message of Barbara Gilmour, an Ocean City resident, author, speaker, and creative voice behind Cool Kind Kid, an anti-bullying strategy that aims to re-define what is cool for kids as they encounter social situations.“The reactive measures don’t work,” said Gilmour. “Let’s provide our children with fun, engaging proactive (techniques to prevent bullying).”Gilmour’s firm, CKK LLC, offers a wide range of services and products aimed at helping students understand that using kindness is a better option than bullying, or tolerating it. The Cool Kind Kid programs teach social skills as a way to be confident and cool in situations that have the potential to go south. It’s working. The program has won 15 national awards, including Parents and Teachers’ Choice awards and earned the National Parenting Council’s Seal of Approval. More important than the accolades is the movement Cool Kind Kid has helped to start and foster.The concept is really simple, Gilmour explained. “We teach children to embrace the concept that being kind is a lot cooler than bullying,” she said. “We teach them to embrace the concept that the kind kid is also the cool kid.”Listening and talking, avoiding being rude, making a good first impression and displaying good manners in any social situation are a few of the areas covered through books, audio CDs, school assembly programs and more. The company is planning a series of fun, informative social skills classes in Ocean City, beginning May 8. There will be four two-hour classes, including snacks. A fifth class will take place at an area restaurant, to put students’ dining etiquette into practical use.Participants also receive a backpack, a picture book and a certificate upon completion.Class sizes are limited to approximately 10 students, Gilmour said, thus early registration is encouraged. For more information, call 609-398-1949 or visit www.coolkindkid.com/social-skills-classes/ https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=10153820585631885&t=7Click on Facebook link to see video of Cool Kind Kid founder Barbara Gilmour being interviewed on a talk show hosted by Kathy Ireland.Gilmour, a Penn State University grad, backs her programs with research and proven curricula.She said that her team has known “since 2008, that social skills training was the missing link in bullying prevention” and the proactive approach could fill the void. She began at the request of her daughter’s college graduation. A few of her daughter’s friends were about to enter the work force and were very concerned about their lack of social skills, especially in dining situations, Gilmour said. “If the candidates for a job are evenly matched on qualifications, the person with the better social skills will be the person who gets the job,” she remarked.Gilmour put an informal class together for her sister’s friends, and the result was so encouraging she decided to launch the company.She enlisted the services of two friends, Sydelle Mason, the holder of a doctoral degree in education from Rutgers, and Wendy McDermott, a PhD in linguistics from Cornell University, to help develop the curriculum.Today, Cool Kind Kid offers classes, books, audio CDs, and entertaining school assembly programs among other products and services.There are also separate parental and teacher resource guides to help reinforce the lessons of the anti-bullying program and to present best practices to implement them. One of the books, “Tanner Wants to be Cool,” traces the journey of a real child facing real-life situations during which decisions must be made. It outlines how kindness, sympathy, empathy and other positive behaviors make more sense than bullying. Table manners may seem to be a lost art nowadays, but Cool Kind Kid brings them back in a fun and engaging way.Bullying starts with rudeness, and it can escalate with bullying and ultimately violence in the worst cases, Gilmour said. Thus, she said, good manners and politeness are the first line of defense against bullying.“These techniques help build confidence in social situations. We help students know what to expect when (a situation arises),” said Gilmour.And as any kid will tell you, confidence is cool. And now, too, so is kindness. Cool Kind Kid creator Barbara Gilmour with Bill Bowman, president and publisher of Kidsville News, and the publication’s mascot “Truman the Dragon” at the N.J. Education Association Convention in Atlantic City. (Photos courtesy of Barbara Gilmour)last_img read more

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Six things Chelsea’s draw at Man City proved

first_imgSee also:City saved by Chelsea legend LampardLampard goal ‘no drama’ for MourinhoMan City v Chelsea player ratingsChelsea midfielder Ramires nursing injuryFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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Fishing the North Coast: Increased allocations for Pacific halibut in 2019

first_imgSome good news coming out of the fishing world – finally. During the ninety-fifth annual meeting of the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC), it was announced that our Pacific halibut allocation for California will be set for the next four years at 39,000 pounds. This is approximately 8,000 net pounds greater than our 2018 quota. According to Tom Marking, who sits on the PFMC Groundfish Advisory Panel, the commission was finally able to work out a compromise between Canada and Alaska …last_img

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India vs Sri Lanka World Cup final: It’s Sachin versus Murali on the D-Day

first_imgThey were the hot favourites and they have made it to the summit – Yes, it’s India vs Sri Lanka World Cup final. And Sachin Tendulkar on his home ground, bidding for a first title in six trips to the World Cup, will take on Muttiah Muralitharan, aiming to win it again in his last game for Sri Lanka. PhotosAnother contest on the cards is Lasith Malinga vs Virender Sehwag. Both are experts in their art. Tendulkar will be under enormous pressure, with India desperate to end a 28-year wait for its second World Cup title and become the first country to win it on home soil. Tendulkar, who will be 38 next month and is showing no signs of being slowed by age, made his first-class debut at Wankhede Stadium – venue for the final – in 1998 and has been in the international arena for two decades.He has scored more runs than any batsman ever – more than 18,000 in ODIs alone – and is one shy of his 100th hundred in international cricket. His nearest rival, recently deposed Australian captain Ricky Ponting, is next on the list with 69.Tendulkar narrowly missed his century of centuries in India’s 29-run semi-final win over archrival Pakistan, but he was dropped four times and had an lbw decision overturned. Such a streaky innings wouldn’t have done the most elegant of batsmen justice.Besides, it adds even more drama to the tournament final in the thriving financial and entertainment hub, home to India’s Bollywood.advertisement”Going back to Mumbai, especially for this event, is a wonderful occasion,” Tendulkar said. “And all I want to say is, we want to be calm, focus on our job and get the job done.”Muralitharan, hobbling and doubtful with a host of nagging injuries, won the World Cup at the age of 23 when Sri Lanka stunned the cricket establishment by winning the premier limited-overs title with a seven-wicket over the Australians at Lahore in 1996.Since then, he has taken more wickets in tests and limited-overs cricket than anyone in history. And he only needs three more to equal Australian pace great Glenn McGrath’s record 71 World Cup wickets.He had his perfect Colombo send off when he took a wicket with his final ball on home soil in Sri Lanka’s semifinal win over New Zealand, when he was hoisted onto his teammates’ shoulders and later did a lap of honor with the national flag.Muralitharan has been through many trials and tribulations, not least when he was no-balled for using what umpires considered an illegal bowling action on his first tour to Australia, so he’s unlikely to let hamstring, groin and side strains stop him rolling in for his last 10 overs of off spin.”Chances are good that Murali will play,” Sri Lanka’s Australian-born coach Trevor Bayliss said Thursday. “He completed 10 overs in the semifinal, and such is the character of the man that he will play even with discomfort.” Sri Lanka’s other injury concern is allrounder Angelo Mathews, who left the field late in the semifinal with a muscle strain.Just in case, though, Sri Lanka is sending veteran seamer Chaminda Vaas and off-spinner Suraj Randiv to Mumbai on standby.The only other concern for Sri Lanka is a lack of time at the crease for its middle order. The Sri Lankans have three of the top five scorers in the tournament, led by opener Tillakaratne Dilshan. Skipper Kumar Sangakkara is also in superb touch at No. 3 and as wicketkeeper.India’s batting is undoubtedly its strength, but the bowling attack did well to defend 260 at Mohali, with all five bowlers taking two wickets apiece.This is the first all-Asian final, and probably the hardest to pick because the combinations match up well.One thing in India’s favor has been its tougher run to the final, following the must-win group match against the West Indies with a big quarterfinal win over three-time defending champion Australia and then ousting Pakistan in a blockbuster semifinal. If India wins on Saturday, it will have beaten every former World Cup champion to capture the title.”It’s important to peak at the right time,” skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni said after the victory over Pakistan. “Throughout the tournament we didn’t have any easy games. Every game we had, we had to struggle. All in all, we’re ready for the finals.”In Sri Lanka’s favor is its World Cup record against India, with four wins from their six completed matches.In India, Sri Lanka is two from two, after winning both the group match and the semifinal final here in 1996, the latter finishing in sensational circumstances.advertisementThe Sri Lankans were awarded the match at Calcutta by default after the 100,000 strong crowd rioted when it became obvious that India would struggle to win. Chasing 252, India was 120 for eight in the 35th over when ICC match referee Clive Lloyd took the teams off the field and then decided to abandon the match when there was more crowd trouble.There’s unlikely to be any repeat of that disturbance, with strict security in place and Wankhede reduced to just over 30,000 in a recently completed refurbishment.With AP inputslast_img read more

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