The Sky’s the Limit (Literally) for Brayden Aller

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News 74 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment HerbeautyJennifer Lopez And Alex Rodriguez’s Wedding DelayedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Education The Sky’s the Limit (Literally) for Brayden Aller STAFF REPORT Published on Wednesday, August 26, 2020 | 1:27 pm Community News Top of the News center_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. More Cool Stuff With mechanical and space engineering degrees from Vanderbilt and Caltech, Brayden Aller is one degree away from pursuing a career — and dream — in the aerospace industry.While interning with the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation, or IACMI — the Composites Institute, over a span of four years, Aller gained industry-leading insight into various aspects of the composites industry by working with different materials and processes.At Vanderbilt University, where he earned his undergraduate degree in 2019 in mechanical engineering and a minor in materials science and engineering, Aller spent two summers at the Laboratory for Systems Integrity and Reliability (LASIR). There he worked on in-line monitoring systems for manufacturing with composite materials.In 2018, he spent the summer as an IACMI intern at TPI Composites in Newton, Iowa where he helped start up a new composites manufacturing plant that will produce composite bus bodies for Proterra, an electric bus company.In 2019, Brayden’s IACMI internship took him to Port Angeles, Washington and the Composite Recycling Technology Center (CRTC). At the CRTC, he assisted in the development of a materials characterization testing procedure to better identify unknown composite materials so they can be better used and recycled.The next stop for Brayden is Pasadena and Caltech, where he earned his master of science in space engineering degree earlier this year and is now pursuing a Ph.D. in space engineering. After earning his doctorate, which Aller plans to have in 2024, it’s on to a career in the aerospace industry.Brayden credits IACMI for sparking his interest in composites.“I will continue to work with composites in the near future,” he explains, “and part of my graduate research will involve working with composite materials in the context of space structures.”“We are committed to cultivating the workforce of the future by offering opportunities for students to become immersed in real-world learning experiences through programs such as our internship program,” said IACMI Workforce Director Joannie Harmon. “Our program is unique in that we retain our interns year after year, offering them a variety of experiences to have a better understanding of the different career options available.” STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Business Newslast_img read more

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Safer Hispanic workers

first_imgWorkers are young and productive”From class surveys, we’ve seen that some of these Hispanicworkers have technical school or college degrees,” Martinez said.”Most are young, single and in the prime of their productivity.They can easily work 14 hour days at strong, labor-intensivework.”Most say they’re in the United States to work so they can sendmoney back home to their families. Their goal is to return home.”Regardless of why they’re here, they’re here and working in avital industry, and they need to be trained,” he said.Fonseca, who began training Hispanic landscape and greenhouseworkers as a Cherokee County extension agent, said the trainingneeds are great.”The poultry industry in the state has the need, too,” he said.”The majority of their workers are now Hispanic.” By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaA $105,000 Occupational Safety and Health Administration grantwill help University of Georgia faculty members accomplish whatthey’ve been trying to do on a shoestring budget: train thestate’s Hispanic landscape workers.OSHA’s Susan Harwood Training Grants focus on improving workers’on-the-job safety records. Plant pathologist Alfredo Martinezserves as the project director for UGA.The project is aimed at reducing equipment- and driving-relatedinjuries and the misuse of pesticides and unnecessary exposure tothem. 75 percent of the work force”Of the 65,000 workers in the state’s green industry, 75 percentare Hispanic,” Martinez said. “As three-fourths of the work force,Hispanics are the backbone of this industry.”The turf, ornamental and landscape companies that make upGeorgia’s green industry are among the fastest-growing in thestate.And the trainings don’t just help those companies and theirworkers. It’s important to everyone around them that theseworkers are trained to work safely, Martinez said.”Every day,” he said, “they’re mixing chemicals and using heavyequipment and tools with rather limited training.”Business owners are eager to have their Hispanic workers trained,he said. The lower insurance premiums and other benefits ofreducing accidents are easy for them to see.Martinez, horticulturist Marco Fonseca and other UGA colleagueshave trained Hispanic workers for years through programs in theUGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Bilingual training materials”We plan to develop more in-depth trainings that include manualsin both Spanish and English,” he said.The HSG specialists plan to train both the Hispanic workers andtheir managers. “We’ve developed a training for managers thatfocuses on understanding cultural differences,” Fonseca said.”These things affect production and safety.”Over the past two years, the group has reached more than 500Hispanic workers.”The workers have learned to trust us, and they’re no longerafraid to approach us,” Martinez said. “I get four to six calls aweek from Hispanics I have met who have questions and need moreinformation.”Of the Hispanic workers who have come to his trainings, Martinezsaid, 75 percent are Mexican. The rest are from Central or SouthAmerica. Hispanic Specialists GroupTwo years ago, they formed Georgia’s Hispanic SpecialistsGroup tounify their efforts.Jorge Atiles, an extension housing specialist with the UGACollege of Family and Consumer Sciences, helped with the grantprocess. Martinez, Fonseca and Atiles have both professional andpersonal reasons to see the program succeed.They work closely with the green industry in their UGA programs,and they’re all Hispanic. Martinez is from Mexico, FonsecaHonduras and Atiles the Dominican Republic.”The Hispanic work force in Georgia has grown 300 percent overthe past decade,” Fonseca said. “They’re a very important laborforce to agribusinesses in the state. And the UGA ExtensionService is in the position to deliver training to them across thestate where it is desperately needed.”In the past, the group trained Hispanic workers primarily onproper pesticide handling. With the grant, Martinez sees morepossibilities.last_img read more

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