New Addiction Treatment Center Offers Hope

first_imgEVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Addiction is never something that’s easy to talk about, but it is a problem on a national scale that need to be addressed. In addition to the emotional and physical toll it takes, drug and alcohol addiction take a toll on society.One way to address this is to work from the ground up and provide comprehensive community-oriented support for people seeking treatment. My Life Recovery Center opened its Pasadena branch today, it is the 15th center to open in the United States.They provide comprehensive care for people facing addiction including mental health experts, doctors and an innovative medication delivery system of Naltrexone, an FDA-approved drug that helps treat additions.“Naltrexone parks in the same nerve receptor parking spot as other opiates [like drugs, presentation painkillers and alcohol],” explained Dr. Daniel Asimus, medical director of My Life Recovery Center.This drug helps reduce cravings and makes it easier for patients to focus on regaining their health, happiness and success. My Life Recovery Centers use a patented Naltrexone implant which delivers the drug in small doses at for months at a time – this ten minute procedure ensures that patients will get a consistent amount of Naltrexone during their recovery.My Life Recovery Center uses these slow release Naltrexone implants in conjunction with six to twelve months of medical care. They work with patients from the initial detox through life coaching to help make health a lifestyle.“We’re working with the total person to really help them know themselves and achieve health, happiness and success,” said Dr. Asimus. “[Addiction] is disease not a choice and we’re here to help people rediscover their lives.”My Life Recovery Center is located at 675 South Arroyo Parkway Suite 430 , Pasadena. Call (888) 998-1568 or visit www.pasadena.myliferecovery.com for more details. faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News New Addiction Treatment Center Offers Hope Story and Photography by VERONICA AN Published on Thursday, February 18, 2016 | 5:22 pm Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a commentcenter_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena HerbeautyThese Lipsticks Are Designed To Make Your Teeth Appear Whiter!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyFollow This Summer Most Popular Celeb Beauty TrendHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeauty Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  More Cool Stuff Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe Community News Top of the News last_img read more

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Fate of Swing States In 2017 Election May Come Down to Housing Market

first_img Related Articles Home / Daily Dose / Fate of Swing States In 2017 Election May Come Down to Housing Market  Print This Post in Daily Dose, Featured, News Fate of Swing States In 2017 Election May Come Down to Housing Market States that are battlegrounds for Republican and Democratic control could potentially see their dominate political party reverse come 2017, according to Daren Blomquist, SVP for ATTOM Data Solutions.Currently, homeowners in Republican-controlled districts are winning seven out of 11 battleground states including Michigan, Ohio, Nevada, and Florida, according to recent data from RealtyTrac. Blomquist says that this trend is in part due to the suburban or rural nature of these states over all.“There are definitely exceptions here, but the cities that are in these states are still very much struggling and not seeing the renaissance that some of the other markets have,” says Blomquist. “The other thing to notice about these battleground states is that unlike nationwide where the Democratic districts are out performing the Republican districts two to one, in many of these states it is a very close battle between the Democratic and Republican districts when it comes to housing returns.”He notes that another hallmark of these states is that many of them were the epicenters of the housing crisis, meaning homeowners are still struggling to gain back the value that was lost during the housing market downturn.“The Democratic districts tend to be more densely populated areas as well as coastal markets, and that’s where we have seen the housing market recovery centered during this housing boom over the last four years,” says Blomquist. “This housing recovery has really been about a return to urban, walkable locations and those areas tend to be Democratic districts in nature.”This trend of battleground states being Republican dominated could reverse though, says Blomquist. “I think you may actually see some of these swing states flip in a sense as that trend takes hold there. In places like Ohio and Michigan where Republicans are beating the Democratic districts only marginally, I would expect to see those areas flip especially as places like Detroit start to experience that renaissance that other cities are seeing across the country.”While this reverse could change the orientation of these states, Blomquist notes that current trends seen nationwide for the housing market are expected to continue for the next four years.“I think the trend toward more urban locations especially for the young buyers is going to continue into the next administration, says Blomquist. “It is fair to say, though, that having a Democratic president in place probably had some influence on the market trends but it’s hard to quantify that, so there will probably be some influence depending on who wins the presidency. I think more importantly, though, is the trend toward going back to the cities and I foresee that continuing for the next four years.” Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Kendall Baer is a Baylor University graduate with a degree in news editorial journalism and a minor in marketing. She is fluent in both English and Italian, and studied abroad in Florence, Italy. Apart from her work as a journalist, she has also managed professional associations such as Association of Corporate Counsel, Commercial Real Estate Women, American Immigration Lawyers Association, and Project Management Institute for Association Management Consultants in Houston, Texas. Born and raised in Texas, Baer now works as the online editor for DS News. About Author: Kendall Baer Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Savecenter_img ATTOM Data Solutions battleground states RealtyTrac 2016-10-05 Kendall Baer The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Tagged with: ATTOM Data Solutions battleground states RealtyTrac Previous: The Real Estate Investors of Today and Tomorrow Next: Meet the Winner of Fannie Mae’s Community Impact Pools Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago October 5, 2016 1,111 Views Sign up for DS News Daily Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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A Marquee ‘Clean Coal’ Project Is Failing

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Ian Austen for the New York Times:An electrical plant on the Saskatchewan prairie was the great hope for industries that burn coal.In the first large-scale project of its kind, the plant was equipped with a technology that promised to pluck carbon out of the utility’s exhaust and bury it underground, transforming coal into a cleaner power source. In the months after opening, the utility and the provincial government declared the project an unqualified success.But the $1.1 billion project is now looking like a green dream.Known as SaskPower’s Boundary Dam 3, the project has been plagued by multiple shutdowns, has fallen way short of its emissions targets, and faces an unresolved problem with its core technology. The costs, too, have soared, requiring tens of millions of dollars in new equipment and repairs.“At the outset, its economics were dubious,” said Cathy Sproule, a member of Saskatchewan’s legislature who released confidential internal documents about the project. “Now they’re a disaster.”The utility that runs the project, SaskPower, and advocates for carbon capture argue that the setbacks are typical teething problems associated with any new and complex technology.“Over time, as more companies, countries engage in carbon capture and storage technologies, the price for everybody is going to come down,” Mike Marsh, the chief executive of SaskPower, told a legislative committee in January. “That will make it easier to employ.”The Boundary Dam Power Station sits near a wealth of resources not far from the North Dakota border.Hundreds of years of coal reserves are buried under the ground nearby, virtually eliminating transportation costs. And the mining creates employment in an area with limited job prospects.“It’s a low-cost, stable supply,” Mr. Marsh said. “There’s a tremendous opportunity in North America to continue to utilize coal.”To the utility and the provincial government, the process known as carbon capture and storage seemed tantalizing when a review of the power system began 11 years ago.The technology offered a way to stick with coal in a carbon-conscious era. It was especially attractive in Canada, where rising emissions from the oil sands have more than offset reductions elsewhere, including Ontario’s abandonment of coal-fired electrical generation.Through the process, machinery would first remove most of the soot and ash from the coal’s exhaust. The exhaust would then pass through a kind of chemical called an amine that would snatch the carbon, in the form of carbon dioxide, out of it. The gathered carbon dioxide, separated from the amine, would be compressed, moved through pipelines and ultimately buried underground.Variations of the technology have been used as far back as the 1920s. And small demonstration projects have largely worked, including one in Norway that opened in 2012.Boundary Dam, which received a major Canadian subsidy and opened in September 2014, was the first full-scale deployment of the technology to cut emissions from burning coal. Saskatchewan picked a process owned by Shell, encouraged by its history with petrochemicals.At the outset, the utility and the province said the project was working as intended, capturing 90 percent of the plant’s carbon. It was the equivalent, they said, of taking 250,000 cars off the road. Environmentalists and politicians from around the world came to check out Boundary Dam.But the success story disintegrated last November when Ms. Sproule, a member of the opposition New Democratic Party, unveiled the confidential documents in the provincial legislature. She wouldn’t identify the people who provided the documents, although the government confirmed their authenticity.The documents showed that the system was working at only 45 percent of capacity. One memo, written a month after the government publicly boasted about the project, cited eight major problem areas. Fixing them, it said, could take a year and a half, and the memo warned that it was not immediately apparent how to resolve some problems.A chart covering the first year of operation showed that the system often didn’t work at all. When it was turned back on after shutdowns for adjustments and repairs, the amount of carbon captured sometimes even dropped.The buoyant public remarks, Mr. Marsh said, accurately reflected the company’s early assessment of the system. “We were very optimistic when this plant came online,” he said.Still, he acknowledged that “there were a few statements that it was achieving more than it had.” Mr. Marsh characterized many of the problems as design issues, such as inadequate temperature control systems, rather than fundamental flaws.But Boundary Dam has exposed a problem with Shell’s process when used with coal exhaust. Despite the plant’s initial filtering, tiny particles of ash still remain in the exhaust and contaminate the amine, reducing its ability to grab carbon, Mr. Marsh said.The control room of a carbon capture and storage facility at Boundary Dam Power Station. Credit Michael Bell/CPTOR, via Associated Press“Over all, we are pleased with the performance of the capture technology,” Shell Canada said in a statement, adding that it was working with SaskPower “to optimize operations and capture any lessons that can be applied to improve future projects.”But the costs are piling up.One shutdown last spring to clean and replenish the chemical cost 17 million Canadian dollars. Mr. Marsh said that the company was still looking for a way to prevent the contamination.The repeated shutdowns have caused SaskPower to miss multiple carbon dioxide deliveries to Cenovus Energy, the Canadian oil company that signed a 10-year contract with the utility to buy most of the gas. (Cenovus uses carbon dioxide to force oil from largely depleted wells.) SaskPower has had to pay 7 million Canadian dollars in penalties, offsetting most of the 9 million Canadian dollars in payments received.On top of that, the carbon system is a voracious consumer of the electricity generated by Boundary Dam, which has 150 megawatts of capacity. Mr. Marsh testified that about 30 megawatts of capacity were consumed by the system, and an additional 15 to 16 megawatts were needed to compress the carbon dioxide.Tim Boersma, the acting director of the energy security and climate initiative at the Brookings Institution, said that extensive power loss is a significant factor keeping other utilities from following SaskPower’s lead.“That is exactly the reason this is not going to fly,” Mr. Boersma said. “The plant’s efficiency goes down so dramatically.”As it continues to sort out the plant’s problems, SaskPower is damping expectations. The utility cut its emissions reduction target for this year to 800,000 metric tons, from one million.The company said it is working with the engineering firm that designed the project to solve the problems and increase efficiency. Mr. Marsh said there were indications that performance was improving. Last month, the utility said the system was working at 67 percent of capacity.Even some environmentalists are hoping for a turnaround.George Peridas, a senior scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council’s climate and clean air program, said his group did not endorse the use of coal, but it accepted that coal would continue to be part of the energy mix.Carbon capture, he said, will be a “vital part” of reducing emissions. Based on discussions with SaskPower, Mr. Peridas said he was confident that Boundary Dam would eventually work out.“I don’t see any indication that the carbon capture system of this plant is broken,” Mr. Peridas said. “It’s had a bumpy start.”Technology to Make Clean Energy From Coal Is Stumbling in Practice A Marquee ‘Clean Coal’ Project Is Failinglast_img read more

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