Irish Water unveil new traffic plans as Letterkenny gridlock continues

first_imgIrish Water has announced a number of minor changes to the current upgrade projects that have caused gridlock in Letterkenny in recent months.There have been calls for the disruptive works on Pearse Road to stop this week as local businesses suffer loses of up to 30%.Irish Water revealed new traffic management plans at a meeting with Letterkenny municipal district councillors this morning. The authority said that the left hand turn from Paddy Harte Road into the Pearse Road will not be reinstated until mid—July.Works on the sewer upgrade will also be extended to Saturdays.They confirmed that the project will cease for the Donegal International Rally and the weekend of July 12.Irish Water has apologised for the inconvenience of works and thanked the Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce, traders and elected officials for the ongoing engagement throughout the project. They said they will also continue to work with An Garda Siochána to facilitate the free movement of traffic around the town.Letterkenny businesses call for roadworks to stop as jobs threatened     Irish Water unveil new traffic plans as Letterkenny gridlock continues was last modified: June 14th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Irish Waterletterkennyroadworkslast_img read more

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Photo library: Tourism and leisure 10

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Tourism & Leisure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Stellenbosch, Western Cape province: An outdoor restaurant at Blaauwklippen Wine Estate.Photo: Stellenbosch WineRoutes » Download high-res image Stellenbosch, Western Cape province: An outdoor restaurant at Dornier Wine Cellar.Photo: Stellenbosch WineRoutes » Download high-res image Johannesburg, Gauteng province: Tourists at the Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto, which is named after the 14-year-old boy who was the first killed by police in the June 16 1976 students’ uprising. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Gauteng province: Frontview of the state-of-the-art Maropeng visitors’ centre at the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, which is famous for the wealth of early human fossils found there.Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Gauteng province: Back view of the state-of-the-art Maropeng visitors’ centre at the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, which is famous for the wealth of early human fossils found there. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image East London, Eastern Cape province: The yacht marina on the seafront. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape province: Sunset over the beachfront sees people running, walking, fishing and cycling to end off the day. Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image TOURISM AND LEISURE 10:{loadposition tourism}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

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Maggots: a sustainable animal feed

first_imgThe common housefly could be a bigfactor in easing the strain on natural marine resources, if the Drew brothers have their way. (Image: Shadowness)  MEDIA CONTACTS • Jason Drew  AgriProtein  + 27 21 422 1887 or +27 83 700 5255 RELATED ARTICLES • New bug leaps into history books • Malaria-proof mosquito a reality • Tanzania’s ‘butterfly effect’ • Pick n Pay greens seafood operationsEmily van RijswijckAn enterprising duo has developed a sustainable alternative to fishmeal and soya livestock feeds, in the process helping to ease the pressure on precious natural resources which are constantly under strain from the growing human population.Originally from the UK, brothers David and Jason Drew are now based in South Africa.For the last three years the two entrepreneurs have been researching the potential of protein-rich fly larvae or maggots as a natural replacement for soya and fishmeal, the two most commonly used sources of protein animal feed used by industrial farmers.Their Cape-based company AgriProtein produces maggot meal, a completely natural protein feed for animals. Maggot meal is obtained by harvesting fly larvae fed on organic waste just before the insects turn into pupae. To make one ton of the meal, about five tons of maggots are required.The larvae are dried and then processed into a fine rich brown powder, to be sold to farmers in 50-kilogramme bags.In terms of nutrient value the product matches that of fishmeal and is superior to soya.Research and developmentThe fly farm and production plant is based in Stellenbosch and for the moment is producing only for research and development purposes, confirms Jason Drew.The facility produces two tons of meal a week. Research is conducted with the help of the University of Stellenbosch‘s Animal Nutritional Department.“We plan to start up a full scale production plant in 2013, which will produce 28 tons per day of the dry product,” says Drew.The company intends to open plants in South Africa and Germany, the latter country because it is one of the world’s leading green nations.According to Drew, the demand for protein feed is almost limitless, and one of the biggest chicken producers in Germany is already showing keen interest.His only concern is whether AgriProtein will be able to keep up with the projected demand of over 2 000 tons per month.Should other countries show interest, the Drew brothers will consider rolling out the technology to them as well.So far, AgriProtein’s research has shown that larvae protein produces better weight gain and lower gizzard erosion scores than fishmeal. Gizzard erosion is a dietary deficiency disease affecting younger birds.Nutrient recyclingAt the heart of AgriProtein’s approach is a relatively new concept: nutrient recycling.Increases in global food demand and pressing environmental challenges have caused prices of both fishmeal and soya feeds to soar in recent years. Fishmeal, for example, has on average almost tripled in price since 2002, according to the IndexMundi data portal.Using organic waste to create a new source of protein – such as animal protein feed – is one way in which we can save the world’s declining fish resources, believes Drew.At the AgriProtein plant the flies are fed waste from abattoirs. This natural way of disposing of the waste also helps the suppliers to cut down on their costs. To ensure success of the venture, the company runs two programmes, for breeding and production.Under natural conditions one female fly can lay about 750 eggs a week and the larva increases in weight by over 400 times in just a few days.Maggots are harvested just before the pupal stage, or after about 72 hours. They are then dried, milled and packed. Because birds and fish eat larvae in the wild, the magmeal is easily digested.AgriProtein uses three types of flies: the common housefly (Musca domestica); the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) and the blow fly (Calliphoridae family), each of which prefers to break down a specific type of organic waste.The end product contains nine essential amino acids, according to the AgriProtein website.And that hint of fishmeal which is sometimes so detectable in battery-reared chickens will also be a thing of the past as maggot meal has a completely neutral taste and odour, Drew confirms.Amazing creaturesLike other insects the fly goes through three phases to reach adulthood: egg, larva, pupa and then adult.One of the most fascinating aspects of these creatures is the ammonia which is produced by fly larvae, a natural secretion used by the creatures to kill bacteria.In the AgriProtein plant the strong smell of ammonia is a by-product of the production process but one which the Drew brothers still plan to tap into as well.“We are looking at ways in which to harvest the ammoniated air to make a natural bleach,” says Drew.last_img read more

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The journey begins before you even leave. — Hansel and Gretel e a Casa de Chocolate (GC468WD) — Geocache of the Week

first_imgInside the Casa de Chocolate. Photo by geocacher TramossosGeocache Name:Hansel and Gretel e a Casa de Chocolate (GC468WD)Difficulty/Terrain Rating:5/3Why this is the Geocache of the Week:When I first saw this geocache, the thing that struck me was the incredible description! I didn’t understand any of it (I don’t speak Portuguese), but I could definitely see the time and effort that went into creating the story and images. From there, a quick look at the logs and the photos showed that this geocache was more than just a pretty description—the container itself is an elaborate puzzle box. Geocache owners that put this much effort into a geocache deserve to be recognized!What geocachers are saying:[translated as best I could from Portuguese]“I really enjoyed it, Falkon Eye congratulations, this was the best cache I’ve ever done.” – eduarda“Magnificent cache !! Certainly deserves all the praise it has received, and from us, a BIG FAVORITE POINT. Congratulations to the owner throughout their dedication to create this geocache.” – SACTeam“Very, very, very good! Shoe-in for (at least) the top 3. Congratulations to the owner on the GREAT accomplishment and thanks for giving us the pleasure of enjoying this MAGNIFICENT cache.” – avilescosPhotos:A lucky geocacher with the logbook. Photo by geocacher Lusitana PaixãoYou’ve got the box, now how do you get it open? Photo by geocacher NarsaThe beginning of this geocache’s page. SharePrint RelatedConcrete floats! — Betonschiff Redentin (GC15D8C) — Geocache of the WeekDecember 4, 2013In “Community”Started from the bottom, now we’re here. — Roof of the World (GC9A9E) — Geocache of the WeekMay 22, 2013In “Community”Karst Mountain Topography — Yangshuo – GE9 — Geocache of the WeekNovember 5, 2015In “Geocache of the Week” What’s the most elaborate geocache you’ve ever found? Tell us in the comments.Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!Share with your Friends:Morecenter_img Portuguêslast_img read more

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Will IoT-driven brand experiences keep the taps flowing?

first_imgInstead of simply quaffing booze, beverage companies want partiers to experience brands, and are using the Internet of Things (IoT) to introduce drinking 2.0.Marketing Week reports that drinks maker Pernod Ricard is increasingly using IoT in its marketing efforts for its products.And while talking to your drink at the bar was previously a warning sign, Pernod Ricard wants to use IoT to let drinkers have an “ongoing conversation” with their tipple of choice.It is doing this by augmenting 40,000 Malibu brand bottles into “digital touchpoints.” The bottles give consumers exclusive content by tapping their smartphone against the bottle. Hopefully gently.“Someone scanning the bottle is not the end of the journey. It brings the product, experience and consumer all together,” said Pernod Ricard UK’s Denis O’Flynn. “We do see [the technology use] becoming broader, where we can incorporate messaging about the product, health guidelines, how to mix and serve it – all that information will be required in future, and will be done through some sort of smart technology.”Digital tech a booming part of media spendingThe company is increasing its media spending in this area, boosting total digital expenditure in 2016 from 31% to 40%.“When it comes to the IoT and [our bottles], clearly we are working on it a lot,” said Pernod Ricard’s managing director of finance and operations Gilles Bogaert. “More and more it will be focused on consumer engagement.”And as beverage-makers get hip to the latest connected technology, they see IoT as a useful technology in boosting consumers brand experience. These being experiences other than getting inebriated.“Potentially it could even help not only to be something passive where consumers can read the scanning but to create an experience for the brand,” said Bogaert.“That’s something we’re looking to do more of in the future. To be able to create more experiences around the brands, including when people are at home organizing parties for instance.”This comes as entertainment and lifestyle companies are increasing turning to connected technology to enhance customer experiences in stadiums and elsewhere. Tags:#branding#Internet of Things#IoT#Malibu#Pernod Ricard Related Posts Follow the Puck Donal Powercenter_img What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua…last_img read more

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Georgetown MBAs Help DC Department of Public Works With New Internship

first_img About the AuthorMax PulciniMax Pulcini is a Philadelphia-based writer and reporter. He has an affinity for Philly sports teams, Super Smash Bros. and cured meats and cheeses. Max has written for Philadelphia-based publications such as Spirit News, Philadelphia City Paper, and Billy Penn, as well as national news outlets like The Daily Beast.View more posts by Max Pulcini regions: Washington, DC Last Updated Sep 26, 2017 by Max PulciniFacebookTwitterLinkedinemail The project involved intensive data collection, analysis, and visualization; process mapping; site visits; and audits. LaCorte and Dzidziguri also worked on a data integrity project to confirm the accuracy of information housed within in the DPW integrated data warehouse.“We were involved in projects that required knowledge from multiple fields,” Dzidziguri said. “For example, I performed statistical analysis on several years of data to identify reasons why the Fleet Management division could not meet its key performance indicators, while at the same time studying the operations and recommending a new map for more efficient processes.”Dzidziguri explained that the the internship was a rewarding experience, and one that required that the second-year MBAs to use the skills they learned in the classroom in the real world.“I learned the importance of being comfortable showing others drafts of my work, asking them for feedback, and incorporating the feedback. This gave me a chance to learn and grow from other people’s experiences,” Dzidziguri said. “Presenting our recommendations to the executives also helped me to employ soft skills acquired during my leadership and negotiations classes.” Georgetown MBAs Help DC Department of Public Works With New Internship Two Georgetown University McDonough of Business MBA students participated in a special internship this summer that offered an intimate look at how Washington DC works. According to a story published on the school’s website, Paul LaCorte (MBA ’18) and Leo Dzidziguri (MBA ’18) spent three months at the DC Department of Public Works’ Office of Organizational Effectiveness and Change Management.This office supports DPW’s Solid Waste Management, Parking Enforcement, and Fleet Management departments through performance management, data analysis, process improvement, strategic planning, and project management. The internship was part of a trial program between the department and the business school.The two MBAs were tasked with conducting a management study to evaluate: Light vehicle repair turnaroundCity-wide compliance with preventative maintenance appointments RelatedWhat Georgetown McDonough MBA Students Learn Outside the ClassroomWhat do Colin Powell, an Indiana dairy farm, the DC Department of Public Works, and a triathalon have in common? They are all part of the fabric that comprises life outside of the classroom for MBA students at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. Sure, it makes sense to judge a…October 19, 2017In “Featured Home”Industry Spotlight: Government in Washington, DCIndustry is one of the essential variables that shapes and defines the culture of any American city. What would life in New York look like without Wall Street? LA without Hollywood? Houston without oil? And, of course, Washington, DC without the Federal Government? According to data from Governing, more than…June 28, 2016In “Featured Home”Finding the Top MBA Employers in Washington DCStudents interested in earning an MBA and working in Washington DC will find no end to the opportunities available. Whether you are looking for opportunities at a governmental agency, a local business, or a massive international retailer, Washington DC—with 15 companies making the Fortune 500 list this year—can provide the…August 21, 2018In “Amazon”last_img read more

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