Crouch, OCRA Announce Recipients of Rural Broadband Planning Grant

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Crouch, OCRA Announce Recipients of Rural Broadband Planning Grant Crouch, OCRA Announce Recipients of Rural Broadband Planning Grant SHARE Source: Office of Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch Facebook Twitter SHAREcenter_img By Hoosier Ag Today – Sep 12, 2018 Facebook Twitter Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch along with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs and the director of broadband opportunities announced that five rural Indiana communities will receive funding as a part of the Broadband Readiness Planning Grant.“Governor Holcomb and I believe that rural Indiana is our next great economic development frontier and it is important we are not leaving rural Indiana and the Hoosiers that call it home behind,” Crouch said. “This grant will help bring high-speed, reliable and affordable Internet to the entire state.”Crouch said that each community will receive a minimum of $50,000 as a part of the Community Development Block Grant program to develop a plan that will educate, create and identify ways to improve broadband speeds in their area.The five recipients receiving funding are:Dale, Ind.English, Ind.; – in partnership with Marengo, Ind. and Milltown, Ind.;Greene County – including Bloomfield, Ind., Jasonville, Ind., Switz City, Ind.  Worthington, Ind. and Smith Township;Marshall County – including Bremen, Ind., Culver, Ind. and La Paz, Ind.; andStarke County – including Hamlet, Ind., Knox, Ind. and North Judson.“These communities provided applications that were evaluated on established federal criteria along with supplied data on location, geography, density, unserved/underserved areas and previous efforts,” said Jodi Golden, Executive Director of OCRA.Golden said that the communities will be a part of a pilot program that will educate and help shape how broadband can be established throughout the entire state.“After successfully working with the Nashville community on establishing their broadband, I am ready to assist these selected areas with understanding their challenges on getting Internet access,” said Scott Rudd, Director of Broadband Opportunities.The Purdue Center for Regional Development will be assisting the pilot communities, and will continue to help the state get Hoosiers out of Internet darkness. The funding for the Community Development Block Grant program comes from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which is administered by OCRA. Previous articleRefiner Waivers Could Cost Ethanol Industry $20 BillionNext articleWASDE Predicts Second-largest Corn Crop, Record Soybean Crop Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

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Food for thought, and testing

first_imgFar from the beaten path of Harvard Square, with its austere libraries and scurrying students, Valerie Nelson is freezing food.Not just any food, but some of the University’s food, which is kept for an undisclosed amount of time in an unidentified location, all in the interest of safety and public health.Nelson is a safety ninja. You might’ve seen her, though most likely not. She’s one of a group of clandestine food inspectors who show up unannounced at some of Harvard’s most publicized events, including Commencement. She was there, sampling the catering trays while using individually wrapped tongue depressors — “Much to the dismay of people serving wonderful things like filet mignon,” she revealed — and was in and out before anyone could stop short, exiting into a haze of fog.“Ninety percent of what I do is under the radar,” said Nelson, whose office is on the outskirts of campus. “It’s a part of the protection of the health and safety of the community that people are not aware of, but it’s happening behind the scenes all the time.”Food samples are refrigerated for three days (most food-borne illnesses emerge during that time, Nelson said) before being frozen, or “archived” for later testing should a need arise.A registered sanitarian, Nelson is public health manager for Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) at the University. She has a litany of responsibilities, but mostly oversees food safety. She’s on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Her program consists solely of her and one part-time staffer.“We’re a one-and-a-half-person team,” she said, though she regularly enlists the help of EHS colleagues who are industrial hygienists, chemists, and biologists.Her team conducts unannounced food safety audits, and her coverage includes the campus’s residential and retail dining spots, Crimson Catering, the Harvard Faculty Club, FAS student grills, and the Dudley House Co-op. “We provide feedback and training based on the results of those audits,” she said.The inspections are less scary than they might seem. Nelson ensures that food is correctly prepared, stored, and served. She works with outside caterers, makes sure they are properly credentialed, and monitors food recalls by the Food and Drug Administration. “We bounce that information out to others so they can check their products and not serve a food that may be potentially unsafe,” she said.But Nelson acknowledges that even outside the office her job has its occupational hazards.“I’ll go to a potluck supper, look at the potentially hazardous foods, and determine which ones I think are safe to eat,” she said with a laugh.Before coming to Harvard, Nelson worked as a city health inspector. “People always asked me where they shouldn’t eat,” she said. “Due to confidentiality, I could never reveal that, so instead I just told them to watch where I go to eat on Friday night and follow me there.”An avid swimmer, Nelson relishes Massachusetts’ lakes, though she sometimes considers the transmissibility of influenza via waterfowl. “I don’t think most people worry about those things,” she joked. “My job does affect me. It’s hard for it not to.”Her advice to those of us cooking today: “It’s important to keep food refrigerated at 41 degrees or below, and to wash your hands before you start. My motto is: Prevent.”last_img read more

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Northern Lights College to host grailquest races

first_img Grailquest has been held for over 20 years and was originally based on the Monty Python movie Quest for the Holy Grail. The race is one part of a series of races known as the Grande Prairie College Cross Country Running Series, where runners earn points towards the season championship. The championship will be presented in Grande Prarie in October.   The event is open to anyone who is interested in running, with different distances designated for specific age groups. Grades 1-3 and 4-6 will run for 1.5 kilometres, grades 7-9 and 10-12 girls will run for 3 km and grades 10-12 boys, plus men and women 19 years old and over will run a 5 km distance. The first person to cross the finish line in each category will win “The Grail” a prize valued at over $100. Medals will also be awarded to runners in all categories based on finishing times.- Advertisement – Draw prizes will also be available to be won by all participants, which are considered to be more valuable than the medals. The event will also feature refreshments after the races are completed. The event costs $8 per runner, and registration begins at 9 a.m. at Northern Lights College. The races will begin at 10 a.m. For more information, email Grant at [email protected]last_img read more

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