Shutdown Delays USMCA Trade Agreement and Release of January WASDE Report

first_img Shutdown Delays USMCA Trade Agreement and Release of January WASDE Report SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Shutdown Delays USMCA Trade Agreement and Release of January WASDE Report The government shutdown could stall progress on President Trump’s North American Free Trade Agreement replacement, the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. Analysis of the agreement has stopped during the shutdown as the U.S. International Trade Commission, responsible for examining the trade agreement, remains at a standstill. If continued, Politico reports the shutdown could delay release of the report on the economic impact of the new agreement.The Trade Commission is required to submit the report, which many lawmakers will use to craft their positions on the deal, by March 15th. USMCA was signed by Trump and his counterparts on November 30th, last year. Trump followed a day later with notification that he would withdraw the current NAFTA if lawmakers didn’t move to approve USMCA quickly.The government shutdown, ending soon or not, is likely to delay the January World Agriculture Supply and Demand report as well. Scheduled for next Friday, January 12th, the World Agricultural Outlook Board needs a full week to release the report, once the government opens. Farm Journal’s AgWeb reports that while most of the information was gathered before the shutdown, analysis of the data remains.Even if lawmakers were to end the shutdown quickly, the delays are still likely at this point. However, reaching a budget agreement appears to be a tough battle with Democrats taking leadership of the House of Representatives and Republicans rejecting a spending plan by House Democrats before the new Congress began Thursday. Traders worry a prolonged shutdown could end with an excess of data flooding the market, including Department of Agriculture WASDE numbers, export sales data, and updates from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.Click below to listen to the HAT Morning Edition podcast where market analyst David Kohli talks about the potential impact a delayed WASDE report could bring to the markets.Source: NAFB News Service Previous articleMore Challenges Ahead for Dairy Producers in 2019 on the HAT Thursday Morning EditionNext articleChina Purchasing More U.S. Soy NAFB News Service By NAFB News Service – Jan 3, 2019 last_img read more

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Baby, It’s Cold Outside

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Forget what the calendar says, winter is here. Long Islanders woke up to chilly conditions Tuesday with gusty winds and temperatures in the low 30s. Forecasters at the National Weather Service in Upton expect a high near 34 Tuesday, but wind chill values between 15 and 25 degrees will make it feel much colder. Forecasters predict gusts as high as 33 mph. The mercury will drop in the evening hours, with meteorologists calling for a low of 21 and wind chill values between 10 and 15 degrees. Sure, it’s blistery, but it could be worse. In Buffalo, residents are dealing with up to 3 feet of snow. The deluge forced officials to close a long stretch of the New York State Thruway and other state roads. There’s no snow in the forecast for the Island in the near future, but the chilly temperatures will hang around. The forecast for Wednesday calls for sunny skies with a high of 33 and wind chill values between 10 and 20 degrees. There will be daytime relief from the cold Thursday and Friday with temperatures in the low 40s but dropping significantly at night.last_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: Smallpox antiviral sought, mass drug dispensing, peanut plant hazards missed, Chinese food safety, cell phone bugs

first_imgMar 6, 2009HHS seeks proposals for smallpox antiviralThe US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a request for proposals (RFP) on its Web site yesterday seeking 1.7 million treatment courses of a smallpox antiviral for the Strategic National Stockpile. The 5-year contract, offered through the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), would cover advanced development of the countermeasure. The contract requires that the smallpox antiviral for adults ages 18 to 64 require no more than 3 doses per day for up to 21 days and have a minimum shelf-life of 36 months. The contract includes options for intravenous and liquid formulations and the capacity to scale up production to make 12 million more courses.[Mar 5 HHS smallpox antiviral RFP]Bank drill to test countermeasure distributionIn one of the first exercises of its kind, banks in two Utah towns will test the logistics of handing out antibiotics or antiviral medications at bank drive-through windows to prepare for an influenza pandemic or bioterrorist attack. The Summit County Health Department is planning the drill, which will take place tomorrow at two Zions Bank branches in Coalville and Kamas, both located about 40 miles east of Salt Lake City. The exercise is funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cities Readiness Initiative, the Salt Lake Tribune reported yesterday.Private inspector missed problems at Georgia peanut plantA private food safety inspector gave the Peanut Corp. of America’s (PCA’s) Georgia processing plant a “superior” rating after auditing it a year ago, though federal inspectors later found the plant had already been shipping Salmonella-tainted products for months before that, the New York Times reported yesterday. With government inspectors overburdened, many food companies pay for private food-safety inspections, which vary widely in their rigor, the report said. The man who inspected the Georgia plant was not aware that peanuts could harbor Salmonella, the story said.[Mar 5 New York Times report]Texas inspector failed to report unlicensed plant tied to outbreakA Texas agriculture inspector who visited the PCA peanut plant in Plainview, Tex., three times in recent years failed to note that it was operating without a state health department license, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today. The inspector, who was assigned to certify the plant to process organic products, wrongly indicated that the plant was licensed, which allowed it to escape state health inspectors’ notice, the story said. The facility came under investigation as a result of the current nationwide Salmonella outbreak linked to PCA products. Though the outbreak has been blamed mainly on the PCA plant in Georgia, the outbreak strain was found in samples from the Texas facility in February.[Mar 6 AP report]China passes new food safety lawIn response to several tainted food incidents, China on Feb 28 passed a new law that strengthens food safety regulation and boosts penalties for offenders, the Voice of America reported on Mar 2.The new law provides extra compensation for victims of tainted food, bans supervisory agencies from advertising food products, and makes people, such as celebrities, who advertise for tainted products liable for damages. Also, China’s departments of health, agriculture, quality supervision, industry, and commerce will share responsibility for monitoring the country’s food supply.MRSA and other bugs on healthcare workers’ cell phonesMobile phones are a source of nosocomial pathogens, and regularly cleaning the devices could reduce the number of infections in healthcare institutions, according to Turkish researchers who presented their findings today in the Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials. They took samples from the phones of 200 healthcare workers, along with samples from the workers’ hands, and found that 94.5% of the phones were contaminated with bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated from 52% of the phones, of which 37.7% were methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). Gram-negative strains were isolated from 31.3% of phones, of which 39.5% were ceftazidime resistant. Only 10.5% of healthcare workers said they routinely cleaned their cell phones.[Mar 6 Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob study]Malaria drug looks promising for treating Hendra and Nipah virus infectionsA drug commonly used to prevent and treat malaria looks like a potential tool for blocking infections with Hendra and Nipah viruses, which cause encephalitis in humans, researchers reported in a Mar 4 early online edition of the Journal of Virology. The group, using a nonlethal engineered virus that contained Hendra proteins on its surface, found that chloroquine inhibited the action of a key enzyme, cathepsin L, that is essential for the growth of the two viruses. Researchers noted that chloroquine is inexpensive and has been widely and safely used for more than 50 years.[Mar 4 Journal of Virology abstract]Defunct infection-fighting gene revived after millions of yearsA gene that helps mammals fight infections like tuberculosis and salmonellosis died out very early in primate evolution but was resurrected eons later in the common ancestor of humans and great apes, according to scientists from the University of Washington and the Howard Hughes Medical institute. The gene, called human IRGM, died in the common ancestor of Old World and New World monkey species, but its remnant persisted through millions of years. The gene somehow became functional again in the ancestor of humans and great apes, possibly when a retrovirus inserted itself into the genome, the scientists report in PLoS Genetics.[Mar 5 University of Washington news release][PLoS Genetics article]last_img read more

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Lady Bulldogs Win 3-Way Swim Meet At South Dearborn

first_imgThe Batesville Lady Bulldogs placed 1st in a Girls 3-Way Swimming Meet at South Dearborn on Tuesday (11-18).Team scores were Batesville 151, South Dearborn 106, Switzerland County 21.Batesville Individual Event Winners: Emily Gutzwiller 200 IM, 100 Breast, Taylor Villani 200/500 Free, Elizabeth Weiler 100 Free, Ashley Daulton 100 Back, and Mary Poltrack 100 Fly.Batesville JV event winners: Mary Poltrack: 50 Free, Lauren Caplinger 100 Free, Sarah Poltrack 100 Back, and Audra Brewer 100 Breast.Lady Bulldogs are 2-0 on the season.  (1-0 EIAC)Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach T. J. Greene.last_img

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