AGRESTI, OLGA G.

first_imgMs. Agresti passed away on January 31, 2017. Born in San Mango Cilento, Italy, Ms. Agresti came to the United States in 1958 and lived in Jersey City and Bayonne. She was a citizen of the United States and Italy and continued to spend time in Italy. Ms. Agresti was a factory worker for the Coca Cola Company. Ms. Agresti is survived by her siblings, Anthony Agresti and his wife Fran, Catherine Cormio, Mary Vitale, Navia Stile, and her husband, Michael, and Lily Maiello, and her husband, Tommy; and many nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. She was predeceased by her parents, Louisa (nee: Vitale) and Pasquale Agresti; and her brothers-in-law, John Cormio and Anthony Vitale. In lieu of flowers, donations to Alzheimer Assoc., 440 Morris Ave. #251, Denville, NJ 07834. Funeral arrangements by BAYONNE MEMORIAL HOME, 854 Avenue C.last_img read more

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Dell Technologies Consuming Less at Hannover Messe

first_imgDid you know that Dell Technologies has the largest IT recycling program in the world? Sustainability is at the heart of everything we do, ranging from sustainable design, responsible and ethical production through to end-of-life and recycling.We walk the talkThis isn’t a principle that we just apply to R&D and manufacturing. We incorporate it into every single business practice, including the design and construction of our exhibition booth at Hannover Messe. Typically, given the temporary nature of trade fair exhibitions, booths are not designed or constructed with sustainability in mind, as much of the material is sadly discarded after the show.Our sustainable standIn contrast, at least 85% of the elements on our booth are sustainable, have been previously used and will continue to be used in the future. In fact, many of the elements have been used at least ten times. The inner structure of our booth is made of plywood frame and laminated wood. LED lighting is used for illumination, while the furniture is sturdy and designed to last. In fact, we have some pieces of furniture on this year’s booth, which date from 2014! Our only new element this year is the monitor wall, which we plan to re-use for future shows. The same goes for our products on the booth, for example, the OptiPlex XE3 uses 44.6% post-consumer recycled plastic/closed loop recycled plastics.Of course, in addition to the sustainability aspect, the booth also has to look aesthetically pleasing with visually strong graphics and impactful demo displays. We believe that the two principles are fully compatible – it’s entirely possible to have a sustainable and attractive booth. Seeing is believing – we invite you to drop by to see for yourself! Store, adapt and refurbishHow does the whole process work? Easy. The big focus is on storing, adapting and refurbishing existing materials. When our booth is dismantled, all the elements are logged and placed in central warehouse storage. When the next event is scheduled, we design our new booth, using the existing materials.What about damage? Not a problem! If there’s a hole on an existing board, it is simply filled in, sanded down and painted over. Of course, we may need to add new boards depending on the dimension of the new booth, but all surplus materials are stored, ready to be re-used in the future.A practical approachIs there anything that cannot be reused? Carpets fall into this category, but they are put to good use afterwards as protective packaging material. Likewise, we cannot re-use graphics, but the materials are made of recycled material and are fully recyclable. In total, these elements represent around 3% of the total materials used on a typical booth. To avoid unnecessary transportation, we also store all the show materials – including computer equipment for demos – in one central location.Common sense prevailsOf course, Hannover is a great venue, easily accessible by public transport. True to that principle, we always look to use sustainable venues, for example, hotels or conference centers versus building a bespoke location. In the booth, we ask for clear sorting of waste and avoid single-use items like paper cups, plastic bottles, printed materials and unsustainable merchandising. In terms of food and beverages, we choose local suppliers as much as possible, estimating quantities as precisely as possible to avoid waste. If food is served, we look to use chicken, fish and vegetables versus red meat.Cost-neutral over the long termWhile a sustainable stand is more expensive initially due to the associated warehousing and refurbishments costs, over the longer-term, it becomes cost-neutral. More importantly, we believe that it’s the right thing to do. Our world faces pressing social and environmental challenges. It’s no longer enough to sit on the side-lines – we all need to do more, consume less and make better use of resources.AnalyticsAnd, that’s not all! Thanks to technology and the use of smart tags, our sustainable booth is smart. We can track what type of visitors come onto the booth, what areas they are most attracted too and how long they stay on average. These insights will help in future designs.Our commitment and our visionOn a closing note, I believe that technology plays a crucial role in driving environmental progress. Digital transformation is giving the world the opportunity to find lasting solutions by decoupling economic growth from carbon emissions. And, we can now use tools to understand what is happening to our climate more clearly than ever before. In fact, IoT and Artificial Intelligence are already helping to improve our knowledge of the world, reduce energy consumption and protect endangered species – read my colleague, Bryan Jones’ fascinating blog here.What are your thoughts on positive social impact? I’d love to hear your comments and questions. If you’re attending Hannover Messe, please stop by to visit our sustainable booth and say hi to our team from Dell Technologies and VMware plus partners from IOTech, SAS, Bormann, TeamViewer, ActionPoint, Tridium and Alleantia. We’ll be at Hall 6, Booth C40, April 1-5.Experience our amazing, interactive demo to learn how Dell Technologies infrastructure can help you harness the power of IoT and AI in your operations at scale.Learn more about how we advance sustainabilityLearn more about Dell Technologies OEM & IoT SolutionsLearn more about Next Generation OEM & IoT Solutions from Dell TechnologiesJoin our LinkedIn OEM & IoT Solutions Showcase pageFollow us on Twitter @delltech and at @dellemcoemlast_img read more

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A Marquee ‘Clean Coal’ Project Is Failing

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Ian Austen for the New York Times:An electrical plant on the Saskatchewan prairie was the great hope for industries that burn coal.In the first large-scale project of its kind, the plant was equipped with a technology that promised to pluck carbon out of the utility’s exhaust and bury it underground, transforming coal into a cleaner power source. In the months after opening, the utility and the provincial government declared the project an unqualified success.But the $1.1 billion project is now looking like a green dream.Known as SaskPower’s Boundary Dam 3, the project has been plagued by multiple shutdowns, has fallen way short of its emissions targets, and faces an unresolved problem with its core technology. The costs, too, have soared, requiring tens of millions of dollars in new equipment and repairs.“At the outset, its economics were dubious,” said Cathy Sproule, a member of Saskatchewan’s legislature who released confidential internal documents about the project. “Now they’re a disaster.”The utility that runs the project, SaskPower, and advocates for carbon capture argue that the setbacks are typical teething problems associated with any new and complex technology.“Over time, as more companies, countries engage in carbon capture and storage technologies, the price for everybody is going to come down,” Mike Marsh, the chief executive of SaskPower, told a legislative committee in January. “That will make it easier to employ.”The Boundary Dam Power Station sits near a wealth of resources not far from the North Dakota border.Hundreds of years of coal reserves are buried under the ground nearby, virtually eliminating transportation costs. And the mining creates employment in an area with limited job prospects.“It’s a low-cost, stable supply,” Mr. Marsh said. “There’s a tremendous opportunity in North America to continue to utilize coal.”To the utility and the provincial government, the process known as carbon capture and storage seemed tantalizing when a review of the power system began 11 years ago.The technology offered a way to stick with coal in a carbon-conscious era. It was especially attractive in Canada, where rising emissions from the oil sands have more than offset reductions elsewhere, including Ontario’s abandonment of coal-fired electrical generation.Through the process, machinery would first remove most of the soot and ash from the coal’s exhaust. The exhaust would then pass through a kind of chemical called an amine that would snatch the carbon, in the form of carbon dioxide, out of it. The gathered carbon dioxide, separated from the amine, would be compressed, moved through pipelines and ultimately buried underground.Variations of the technology have been used as far back as the 1920s. And small demonstration projects have largely worked, including one in Norway that opened in 2012.Boundary Dam, which received a major Canadian subsidy and opened in September 2014, was the first full-scale deployment of the technology to cut emissions from burning coal. Saskatchewan picked a process owned by Shell, encouraged by its history with petrochemicals.At the outset, the utility and the province said the project was working as intended, capturing 90 percent of the plant’s carbon. It was the equivalent, they said, of taking 250,000 cars off the road. Environmentalists and politicians from around the world came to check out Boundary Dam.But the success story disintegrated last November when Ms. Sproule, a member of the opposition New Democratic Party, unveiled the confidential documents in the provincial legislature. She wouldn’t identify the people who provided the documents, although the government confirmed their authenticity.The documents showed that the system was working at only 45 percent of capacity. One memo, written a month after the government publicly boasted about the project, cited eight major problem areas. Fixing them, it said, could take a year and a half, and the memo warned that it was not immediately apparent how to resolve some problems.A chart covering the first year of operation showed that the system often didn’t work at all. When it was turned back on after shutdowns for adjustments and repairs, the amount of carbon captured sometimes even dropped.The buoyant public remarks, Mr. Marsh said, accurately reflected the company’s early assessment of the system. “We were very optimistic when this plant came online,” he said.Still, he acknowledged that “there were a few statements that it was achieving more than it had.” Mr. Marsh characterized many of the problems as design issues, such as inadequate temperature control systems, rather than fundamental flaws.But Boundary Dam has exposed a problem with Shell’s process when used with coal exhaust. Despite the plant’s initial filtering, tiny particles of ash still remain in the exhaust and contaminate the amine, reducing its ability to grab carbon, Mr. Marsh said.The control room of a carbon capture and storage facility at Boundary Dam Power Station. Credit Michael Bell/CPTOR, via Associated Press“Over all, we are pleased with the performance of the capture technology,” Shell Canada said in a statement, adding that it was working with SaskPower “to optimize operations and capture any lessons that can be applied to improve future projects.”But the costs are piling up.One shutdown last spring to clean and replenish the chemical cost 17 million Canadian dollars. Mr. Marsh said that the company was still looking for a way to prevent the contamination.The repeated shutdowns have caused SaskPower to miss multiple carbon dioxide deliveries to Cenovus Energy, the Canadian oil company that signed a 10-year contract with the utility to buy most of the gas. (Cenovus uses carbon dioxide to force oil from largely depleted wells.) SaskPower has had to pay 7 million Canadian dollars in penalties, offsetting most of the 9 million Canadian dollars in payments received.On top of that, the carbon system is a voracious consumer of the electricity generated by Boundary Dam, which has 150 megawatts of capacity. Mr. Marsh testified that about 30 megawatts of capacity were consumed by the system, and an additional 15 to 16 megawatts were needed to compress the carbon dioxide.Tim Boersma, the acting director of the energy security and climate initiative at the Brookings Institution, said that extensive power loss is a significant factor keeping other utilities from following SaskPower’s lead.“That is exactly the reason this is not going to fly,” Mr. Boersma said. “The plant’s efficiency goes down so dramatically.”As it continues to sort out the plant’s problems, SaskPower is damping expectations. The utility cut its emissions reduction target for this year to 800,000 metric tons, from one million.The company said it is working with the engineering firm that designed the project to solve the problems and increase efficiency. Mr. Marsh said there were indications that performance was improving. Last month, the utility said the system was working at 67 percent of capacity.Even some environmentalists are hoping for a turnaround.George Peridas, a senior scientist with the Natural Resources Defense Council’s climate and clean air program, said his group did not endorse the use of coal, but it accepted that coal would continue to be part of the energy mix.Carbon capture, he said, will be a “vital part” of reducing emissions. Based on discussions with SaskPower, Mr. Peridas said he was confident that Boundary Dam would eventually work out.“I don’t see any indication that the carbon capture system of this plant is broken,” Mr. Peridas said. “It’s had a bumpy start.”Technology to Make Clean Energy From Coal Is Stumbling in Practice A Marquee ‘Clean Coal’ Project Is Failinglast_img read more

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Seegobin, Wilson condemn Diplomats to 202 run thrashing

first_imgDEONARINE Seegobin stroked a match-winning 70 while Stephon Wilson grabbed 6 wickets for the Georgetown Cricket Club (GCC) who whipped Diplomats by 202-runs on Saturday at the GCC ground, Bourda.Action in the Georgetown Cricket Association (GCA)/New Building Society 2nd division 40-over tournament was limited this weekend to the one match played. Seegobin, who led the batting with his half-century, smashed 7 fours and a six, opening the batting for GCC, who eventually made a whopping score of 246 all out in their 40 overs.Timothy McAlmont chipped in with 38 while Carlos LaRose supported with 26 for GCC, as Diplomats skipper, Nigel Sampson, grabbed 3 wickets.Taking full advantage of the home conditions and the big total, GCC followed up their ruthless batting outing with some hostility in the bowling department.A woeful Diplomats eventually crashed to a paltry 44 all out in just 17 of their allotted 40 overs. Left-arm spinner Stephon Wilson returned impressive figures of 6-11 as no Diplomats batsman reached double figures.last_img read more

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