ROTC works to ‘serve others’ with blood drive

first_img “A central idea of the military is looking to serve others at all times,” senior Army ROTC cadet Kyle Hanratty said. “This event is a great way for us to accomplish that goal.” The blood drive takes place from noon to 6 p.m. both days in the LaFortune Ballroom. The drive will be run by the service clubs of the Army, Navy and Air Force branches: the Alliance to Lead and Serve (ATLAS) Club, the Trident Naval Society and the Arnold Air Society.  Hanratty also said ATLAS is looking to have a group of students travel with non-ROTC Notre Dame students to Honduras during fall break to work in orphanages there.  Hanratty said the blood drive is open to all students, staff and faculty, not just ROTC students, and that campus-wide participation is necessary for the three service clubs to surpass last year’s total of 235 pints of blood donated. In order to address this “vital need” for blood as fully as possible, all the blood donated at the event will be given to the American Red Cross. In addition, snacks and drinks will be provided to all donors. The semi-annual blood drive is one of several service events sponsored by the three ROTC service clubs, including the Trident Naval Society’s 24-hour run around campus and ATLAS’s volunteer program at the Robinson Community Learning Center. center_img “Being in the military gives you a whole different perspective on the vital need for blood as a means of saving lives,” Hanratty said. “But that need is a common one that isn’t just limited to the military.” In keeping with the spirit of service at Notre Dame, the University’s three Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) branches are sponsoring their semi-annual blood drive today and Thursday. But Hanratty said achieving the blood donation goal is not simply a matter of beating last year’s total; rather, the more blood donated, the more people will benefit from the generosity of the Notre Dame community. “This blood drive and the other ROTC service projects really represent the military’s commitment to service,” Hanratty said. “But we need the help of all students to accomplish our service goals.”last_img read more

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New York nurses decry lack of COVID equipment

first_imgMembers of the medical staff listen as Montefiore Medical Center nurses call for N95 masks and other ‘critical’ PPE to handle the coronavirus pandemic on April 1, 2020 in New York. AFP The protest, rare in the age of socialdistancing, was over a lack of masks, gowns, and other protective equipment forhealth workers treating coronavirus patients in the epicenter of America’sdeadly pandemic. NEW YORK – “Soldiers don’t go to warwithout guns, why should nurses come to work without protective equipment?” askedLeyrose McIntyre, one of around 30 nurses demonstrating outside a New Yorkhospital on Thursday.center_img New York has recorded almost 100,000confirmed cases – including some 2,300 deaths – and the nurses say a shortageof equipment is putting their lives at risk. (AFP)last_img read more

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