Emirates trumpets world’s shortest A380 route

first_imgAn Emirates A380 AIRLINES often crow about having the world’s longest flights but Emirates is trumpeting its newest Airbus A380 destination as the world’s shortest for the superjumbo.The Dubai-based carrier will upgrade one of its nine daily flights between Dubai and Doha to an A380 service from December 1 on what is the 45th A380 route for the airline and the shortest for the aircraft at just over 235 miles (379kms)  each way.The airline justified using the long-range superjumbo on the short route by saying  demand for Doha had been steadily increasing to the point it had carried more than 700,000 passengers between the cities so far this year.“The upgrade to the A380 will provide Emirates the increased ability to serve growing demand for travel out of Doha,’’ it said. “The double-decker has also proved tremendously popular with customers, and the upcoming service in December will give travellers from Qatar the chance to experience Emirates’ award-winning A380 onboard product and service to Dubai and seamless A380 journeys to some of Emirates most popular destinations.’’The gulf carrier has timed the flights so that travellers will have connections of less than four hours to popular destinations such as London Heathrow, New York, Paris and Rome.The superjumbos on the route will be in a three-class configuration with 429 seats in economy, 76 flat-bed seats in business and 14 first-class suites. They will also come equipped with the airline’s renowned in-flight bar and entertainment system, althoughit willl be a choice between a quick drink or a short program on a flight lasting about an hour.Emirates is the world’s biggest operator of A380s with 85 in service and 57 on order and competes with Abu Dhabi-based Etihad and Doha-based Qatar. It recently upgraded its business class product and bar and is working on a new first class product.Emirates president Tim Clark, who says the aircraft works well for airline and is popular with customers, recently warned that the world would need more A380s to cope with capacity problems at airports.Read Sir Tim’s comments.Airbus announced earlier this year that it will more than halve production of the superjumbo from the current 2.5 per month to one a month because of lacklustre demand.But Airbus chief executive Tom Enders, speaking at an event to celebrate the manufacturer’s 10,000th aircraft delivery,  predicted there would still be a demand for the A380 “for many years to come”.last_img read more

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Maggots: a sustainable animal feed

first_imgThe common housefly could be a bigfactor in easing the strain on natural marine resources, if the Drew brothers have their way. (Image: Shadowness)  MEDIA CONTACTS • Jason Drew  AgriProtein  + 27 21 422 1887 or +27 83 700 5255 RELATED ARTICLES • New bug leaps into history books • Malaria-proof mosquito a reality • Tanzania’s ‘butterfly effect’ • Pick n Pay greens seafood operationsEmily van RijswijckAn enterprising duo has developed a sustainable alternative to fishmeal and soya livestock feeds, in the process helping to ease the pressure on precious natural resources which are constantly under strain from the growing human population.Originally from the UK, brothers David and Jason Drew are now based in South Africa.For the last three years the two entrepreneurs have been researching the potential of protein-rich fly larvae or maggots as a natural replacement for soya and fishmeal, the two most commonly used sources of protein animal feed used by industrial farmers.Their Cape-based company AgriProtein produces maggot meal, a completely natural protein feed for animals. Maggot meal is obtained by harvesting fly larvae fed on organic waste just before the insects turn into pupae. To make one ton of the meal, about five tons of maggots are required.The larvae are dried and then processed into a fine rich brown powder, to be sold to farmers in 50-kilogramme bags.In terms of nutrient value the product matches that of fishmeal and is superior to soya.Research and developmentThe fly farm and production plant is based in Stellenbosch and for the moment is producing only for research and development purposes, confirms Jason Drew.The facility produces two tons of meal a week. Research is conducted with the help of the University of Stellenbosch‘s Animal Nutritional Department.“We plan to start up a full scale production plant in 2013, which will produce 28 tons per day of the dry product,” says Drew.The company intends to open plants in South Africa and Germany, the latter country because it is one of the world’s leading green nations.According to Drew, the demand for protein feed is almost limitless, and one of the biggest chicken producers in Germany is already showing keen interest.His only concern is whether AgriProtein will be able to keep up with the projected demand of over 2 000 tons per month.Should other countries show interest, the Drew brothers will consider rolling out the technology to them as well.So far, AgriProtein’s research has shown that larvae protein produces better weight gain and lower gizzard erosion scores than fishmeal. Gizzard erosion is a dietary deficiency disease affecting younger birds.Nutrient recyclingAt the heart of AgriProtein’s approach is a relatively new concept: nutrient recycling.Increases in global food demand and pressing environmental challenges have caused prices of both fishmeal and soya feeds to soar in recent years. Fishmeal, for example, has on average almost tripled in price since 2002, according to the IndexMundi data portal.Using organic waste to create a new source of protein – such as animal protein feed – is one way in which we can save the world’s declining fish resources, believes Drew.At the AgriProtein plant the flies are fed waste from abattoirs. This natural way of disposing of the waste also helps the suppliers to cut down on their costs. To ensure success of the venture, the company runs two programmes, for breeding and production.Under natural conditions one female fly can lay about 750 eggs a week and the larva increases in weight by over 400 times in just a few days.Maggots are harvested just before the pupal stage, or after about 72 hours. They are then dried, milled and packed. Because birds and fish eat larvae in the wild, the magmeal is easily digested.AgriProtein uses three types of flies: the common housefly (Musca domestica); the black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) and the blow fly (Calliphoridae family), each of which prefers to break down a specific type of organic waste.The end product contains nine essential amino acids, according to the AgriProtein website.And that hint of fishmeal which is sometimes so detectable in battery-reared chickens will also be a thing of the past as maggot meal has a completely neutral taste and odour, Drew confirms.Amazing creaturesLike other insects the fly goes through three phases to reach adulthood: egg, larva, pupa and then adult.One of the most fascinating aspects of these creatures is the ammonia which is produced by fly larvae, a natural secretion used by the creatures to kill bacteria.In the AgriProtein plant the strong smell of ammonia is a by-product of the production process but one which the Drew brothers still plan to tap into as well.“We are looking at ways in which to harvest the ammoniated air to make a natural bleach,” says Drew.last_img read more

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2014 Geocaching International Film Festival Call for Entries

first_img SharePrint RelatedInterviews With Geocaching Filmmakers – Part 3February 20, 2015In “GIFF”Interviews With Geocaching Filmmakers – Part 2February 18, 2015In “GIFF”Last Call: GIFF Videos Due July 1stJune 17, 2014In “Community” Your vision of geocaching cannot be contained by a simple Facebook photo, Tweet or even a mighty blog post. Nay, we say, your vision deserves much more. You need to tell your geocaching story through the majesty of a short video. Ready your geocaching muse. The Geocaching International Film Festival (GIFF) wants your vision of the adventure of geocaching to take flight in video on the big screen this summer in Seattle. It all happens the night before the Geocaching Block Party, which you should also attend.Enter your four minute video in any family-friendly genre: narrative, documentary, music video, animation, experimental, etc… Hurry up, the deadline for submissions is July 1, 2014. To show you what it takes, and to enter, we have just what you need: A short film.[youtube:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcOmdGWLD6Y&feature=youtu.be]Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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How retailers will use emotion AI — online and in store

first_imgWhy IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Gawain Morrison Tags:#Beacons#featured#Internet of Things#IoT#retail#top Whether customers feel good or bad about their experiences is ultimately underpinned by their emotions. This doesn’t matter what context they are in — every interaction is emotional.As consumers, our shopping experiences mean quite a lot to us. If we stand in ridiculously big queues or receive terrible customer service, we are most likely to stay far away from or never return to that store. On the other hand, however, if we are delighted with the store’s customer service, the product range or even the floor layout, we are most likely to continuously purchase and build a relationship with the brand. Thus it is how we feel about and interact with a brand that drives our consumer decisions.See also: How AI and autonomy may create a new era in car insuranceAs a business, you might be saying to yourself “we already know this – what’s the point?” but have you ever sat back and thought about whether you actually know how your customers are truly feeling while experiencing your brand in-store and online? The answer is probably no. And that’s why more and more retail experts are interested in the use of emotion AI.Emotion AI takes artificial intelligence to the next level. The SXSW 2017 festival received lots of talk about the rise of chatbots within retail and how brands like Burberry and Nike are handing their customer services over to an artificial intelligence. But how do consumers feel about this? Would you like your inquiries to be dealt with by a robot?Reaction has been positiveIn fact, the use of AI within retail has received positive reactions. Forbes research shows that 70% of millennials in the US and 62% in the UK claim they would appreciate a brand or retailer using AI technology to show more interesting products. And on top of that, Gartner predicts that, by 2020, 85% of customer interactions in retail will be managed by AI.While its use is perceived positively for efficient customer interactions, a key point has been made in various discussions; AI needs an emotional human touch if the customer service is to be consumer-friendly.Adding empathy to AI would not only improve the personalisation of digital communication between customers and retailers, but also the physical interactions. Using emotion AI technology in-store will allow brands to understand and react to the emotional engagement of consumers. Facial recognition technology and GSR sensors could be used to show:What areas of the store are most engaging,Whether and when consumers feel stressed or disengaged within the store,What products & offers are most engaging,The emotional response to store layout and customer service.The usefulness of emotion detection is enormous but retailers must primarily consider the opinions of their customers. Some may be ok with it, yet some may find it quite “creepy” and intrusive. As a brand, you have the opportunity to be a leader in this space – by being ethically responsible. You must show transparency at all times. Trust is the new currency for engagement and relationships, so demonstrate responsibility to earn it.Expect use of emotion AI to growThe use of emotion AI within the fashion industry will only grow. It will become massive in online retail, where you can understand emotions of your customers when you aren’t in front of them. It will help retailers in the physical stores understand the consumers’ emotional journeys. And while there may be concerns as to whether AI will disrupt human engagement there should be focused on the benefits it can bring to human interaction.There is value in every moment of emotional responses of consumers – whether they are angry, happy, disappointed – and you should be part of sharing that experience as a brand, business owner or staff member to capitalize on it and help them. This space is not about disrupting the high street experience but about complimenting it and enhancing the customers’ emotional engagement. Ultimately, using consumers’ emotional data alongside traditional methods of customer feedback, the retail sector can finally gain a full 360 understanding of consumers and take action to improve business services and success. Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…center_img Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Related Posts Follow the Pucklast_img read more

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