Crouch, OCRA Announce Recipients of Rural Broadband Planning Grant

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Crouch, OCRA Announce Recipients of Rural Broadband Planning Grant Crouch, OCRA Announce Recipients of Rural Broadband Planning Grant SHARE Source: Office of Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch Facebook Twitter SHAREcenter_img By Hoosier Ag Today – Sep 12, 2018 Facebook Twitter Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch along with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs and the director of broadband opportunities announced that five rural Indiana communities will receive funding as a part of the Broadband Readiness Planning Grant.“Governor Holcomb and I believe that rural Indiana is our next great economic development frontier and it is important we are not leaving rural Indiana and the Hoosiers that call it home behind,” Crouch said. “This grant will help bring high-speed, reliable and affordable Internet to the entire state.”Crouch said that each community will receive a minimum of $50,000 as a part of the Community Development Block Grant program to develop a plan that will educate, create and identify ways to improve broadband speeds in their area.The five recipients receiving funding are:Dale, Ind.English, Ind.; – in partnership with Marengo, Ind. and Milltown, Ind.;Greene County – including Bloomfield, Ind., Jasonville, Ind., Switz City, Ind.  Worthington, Ind. and Smith Township;Marshall County – including Bremen, Ind., Culver, Ind. and La Paz, Ind.; andStarke County – including Hamlet, Ind., Knox, Ind. and North Judson.“These communities provided applications that were evaluated on established federal criteria along with supplied data on location, geography, density, unserved/underserved areas and previous efforts,” said Jodi Golden, Executive Director of OCRA.Golden said that the communities will be a part of a pilot program that will educate and help shape how broadband can be established throughout the entire state.“After successfully working with the Nashville community on establishing their broadband, I am ready to assist these selected areas with understanding their challenges on getting Internet access,” said Scott Rudd, Director of Broadband Opportunities.The Purdue Center for Regional Development will be assisting the pilot communities, and will continue to help the state get Hoosiers out of Internet darkness. The funding for the Community Development Block Grant program comes from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which is administered by OCRA. Previous articleRefiner Waivers Could Cost Ethanol Industry $20 BillionNext articleWASDE Predicts Second-largest Corn Crop, Record Soybean Crop Hoosier Ag Todaylast_img read more

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Chamber expands operations to Shannon Free Zone

first_imgShannon Chamber Webinar to help people cope with the stresses of COVID-19 Shannon Chamber members briefed on infrastructure developments and smart technologies introduced by ESB Networks Print TAGSEI ElectronicsFree ZoneHelen DownesMichael GuineeMinconPaddy PurcellRay O’DriscollShannon Airport HouseShannon ChamberShannon Commercial PropertiesSkycourt Ei Electronics give Tom Clifford Park a lift Twitter WhatsApp Companies should monitor energy water and waste according to seminar in Shannon Chamber Minister to address chamber on national plans Previous articleLimerick event bridges gap between education and employmentNext articleJoseph and his Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Editor center_img Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsBusinessChamber expands operations to Shannon Free ZoneBy Editor – November 18, 2017 2508 Shannon Chamber chief executive Helen Downes and President Julie Dickerson with Matthew Thomas, and Ray O’Driscoll of the Shannon Group and the Chamber team (back left): Cillian Griffey, Lijana Kizaite, Dympna O’Callaghan and Deirdre MurphyOver the past 21 years, Shannon Chamber has become an intrinsic part of the business community in the greater Shannon area and has expanded both its membership base and its staff complement.To cater for the needs of this growing membership, which now stands at over 300 companies with an extended reach to their 10,000 employees, and to give its staff of six greater space in which to work, the Chamber has opened a second office in the newly refurbished Shannon Airport House at Shannon Free Zone.Its former head office in SkyCourt will remain open and be used more extensively by Shannon Chamber Skillnet to provide a range of training programmes to member companies.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Chamber chief executive Helen Downes said that the Chamber has an expansive remit and an exceptionally heavy workload, which required them to look at expanding to larger premises to accommodate its increasing staff numbers.“Having a presence on the Free Zone also brings us closer to our membership, which is, in the main, from the wide sectoral representation located in the Zone and the wider Shannon area. Retaining our office in SkyCourt means that we can maintain the link with the retail community, the commercial heart of Shannon.“It’s a new era for the Chamber; a time to plan for bigger and greater in the next decade. Our founding board set the foundations for what we are and where we are today and it’s at a time like this that I get the opportunity, on behalf of the board, to thank our founders, most especially, Michael Guinee, chairman, CEO and founder of Ei Electronics and Paddy Purcell, chairman and founder of Mincon, for their entrepreneurial foresight; both continue to take a great interest in what we do and were very supportive of this expansion,” added Ms Downes.Shannon Chamber chief executive Helen Downes and president Julie Dickerson (front row) with Ray O’Driscoll and Matthew Thomas of the Shannon Group and membrrs of Shannon Chamber board .Welcoming the Chamber to Shannon Airport House, Ray O’Driscoll, managing director, Commercial Properties, Shannon Group plc said: “They arrive at an exciting time in Shannon Commercial Properties’ journey as we regenerate the Free Zone and rebrand our €25 million first phase redevelopment as Gateway West in the Shannon Free Zone. We look forward to working with them to promote all that is great about Shannon for FDI, SMEs and entrepreneurs. Their strategic positioning, as the first point of contact in our newly established Gateway Hub at Shannon Airport House and at the heart of the Free Zone, will serve as a beacon to new and expanding enterprise.”More business news here Email Linkedin Facebook Midsummer Fairways for Shannon Chamber Members last_img read more

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Put down those cold cuts

first_img Related What we eat and why we eat it The dietary factor People who increased their daily servings of red meat over an eight-year period were more likely to die during the subsequent eight years than those who did not increase their red meat consumption, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that decreasing red meat and simultaneously increasing healthy alternative food choices over time was associated with lower mortality.A large body of evidence has shown that greater consumption of red meat, especially processed red meat, is associated with higher risk of Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancers, including those of the colon and rectum, and premature death. This is the first longitudinal study to examine how changes in red meat consumption over time may influence that risk.For this study, researchers used health data from 53,553 women in the Nurses’ Health Study and 27,916 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline. They looked at whether changes in red meat consumption from 1986 to 1994 predicted mortality in 1994 to 2002, and whether changes from 1994 to 2002 predicted mortality in 2002 to 2010.Increasing total processed meat intake by half a daily serving or more was associated with a 13 percent higher risk of mortality from all causes. The same amount of unprocessed meat increased mortality risk by 9 percent. The researchers also found significant associations between increased red meat consumption and increased deaths due to cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and neurodegenerative disease.The association of increases in red meat consumption with increased relative risk of premature mortality was consistent across participants irrespective of age, physical activity level, dietary quality, smoking status, or alcohol consumption, according to the researchers.Study results also showed that, overall, a decrease in red meat together with an increase in nuts, fish, poultry without skin, dairy, eggs, whole grains, or vegetables over eight years was associated with a lower risk of death in the subsequent eight years.The researchers suggest that the association may be due to a combination of components that promote cardiometabolic disturbances, including saturated fat, cholesterol, heme iron, preservatives, and carcinogenic compounds produced by high-temperature cooking. Red meat consumption also was linked recently to gut microbiota-derived metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which might promote atherosclerosis.“This long-term study provides further evidence that reducing red meat intake while eating other protein foods or more whole grains and vegetables may reduce risk of premature death,” said senior author Frank Hu, Fredrick J. Stare Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology and chair, Department of Nutrition. “To improve both human health and environmental sustainability, it is important to adopt a Mediterranean-style or other diet that emphasizes healthy plant foods.”The first author of the study is Yan Zheng, a former postdoctoral associate in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard Chan School and now a professor at Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Other Harvard Chan School authors include Yanping Li, Ambika Satija, Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, Eric Rimm, and Walter Willett. The study cohorts were supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, and the current study was supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and the Boston Obesity Nutrition Research Center.“Association of Changes in Red Meat Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Among U.S. Women and Men: Two Prospective Cohort Studies,” Yan Zheng, Yanping Li, Ambika Satija, An Pan, Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, Eric Rimm, Walter C. Willett, Frank B. Hu, BMJ, online June 12, 2019, doi: 10.1136/bmj.l2110. Could a popular food ingredient raise the risk for diabetes and obesity? The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. ‘There they are, on our dinner plates’ Ph.D. students explore the culture and science of food in the Veritalk podcast Philosophy professor’s book asks humans to rethink their relationships with animals last_img read more

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Cuadrado close to Juve switch

first_img Juve chief executive Giuseppe Marotta was quoted over the weekend saying the Champions League finalists were hopeful of landing the Colombia international on loan. The Turin club have now further declared their interest by releasing a brief clip of the 27-year-old apparently being mobbed by fans on arrival at Malpensa Airport in northern Italy. An accompanying tweet translated as: “Has come! He quickly found an extraordinary welcome ! #WelcomeCuadrado.” Cuadrado, one of Colombia’s star players at last year’s World Cup, has failed to make an impact at Stamford Bridge since moving from Fiorentina for an initial £23.3million in February. He signed a four-and-a-half year contract at Chelsea but it seems the club are already willing to allow him to play elsewhere. Juventus appear to be moving closer to the expected signing of Chelsea’s Juan Cuadrado after releasing pictures of the winger being welcomed in Italy.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Sweden awaits Lotteriinspektionen gambling report

first_img Swedish gambling regulatory body Lotteriinspektionen will today publish its commissioned report, detailing provisions for a potential national regulated gambling framework.Swedish MPs and industry stakeholders have eagerly awaited the report, which was commissioned by the government in 2015 for the purpose of commencing a license-based system for gambling operators.In January, fears arose of further industry regulatory delays following the departure of Hakan Hallstedt as Director General of Lotteriinspektionen. Hallstedt been charged with leading the reform of Sweden’s national gambling framework to include secure provisions for digital services.Swedish stakeholders will be pleased that Lotteriinspektionen has stayed on course and delivered its initial industry report.This week, business news source Reuters reported that Lotteriinspektionen may advise the Swedish government to sell/scrap state-owned gambling operator Svenska Spel. The gambling regulator is said to detail that a gambling sector without a state-owned enterprise will be appealing to international firms’ eyeing market entry.The report is said to take into account a large number of Swedish-founded European online betting operators such as Kindred Group, Betsson AB and Leo Vegas who have formed successful enterprises without a Swedish regulatory decree to date.The Lotteriinspektionen report urges the government to create fair and open conditions for these operators, as they will become the highest revenue generators for charities and social initiatives benefiting from gambling taxes.Industry stakeholders eyeing the Swedish market, will want no legislative surprises attached to the report. Following a number of mass delays to the German sports betting bill, due to its provisions failing to meet EU standards, gambling  stakeholders expect Sweden to deliver legislation aligned with common market policy. LeoVegas hits back at Swedish regulations despite Q2 successes August 13, 2020 Submit Kindred marks fastest route to ‘normal trading’ as it delivers H1 growth July 24, 2020 Share Svenska Spel becomes 2020 eHockey Championship sponsor August 18, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Related Articleslast_img read more

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