The New Urbanism and the church

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Episcopal News Service] In my position at Bexley Hall, I teach theology, ethics and liturgics. I also teach a class on The New Urbanism and urban design. When I talk with people about what I do, it is that last area that elicits the most quizzical looks; occasionally someone will be bold enough to ask what it has to do with the church.It’s a good question.The New Urbanism is a movement in urban planning which emphasizes developing and rehabilitating walkable, human-scaled neighborhoods. Some of the principles that its proponents value include mixed-use zoning (so homes, shops and schools can all be close to each other, rather than requiring a car); greater public transportation where practicable; more and better shared spaces in parks, plazas, sidewalks and the like; neighborhoods designed so that people of various ages, physical abilities and financial resources might live in and enjoy them; and working to develop cities and suburbs that are greener, more livable and sustainable. It might seem appealing, but the church’s role might not be obvious.As I said, it’s a good question – sometimes I even find myself wondering. And then I remember Raquel Nelson.April 10, 2010, Ms. Nelson, a 30-year old mom of three, was walking home with her children after getting off the bus. They had been shopping earlier and ate pizza to celebrate 4-year-old A.J.’s birthday, which was the next day. At Wal-Mart, Ms. Nelson bought her son a goldfish as a present. But on their way back, they missed their bus and had to wait for the next one. They were an hour late coming home, and it was getting dark.Night had fallen by the time the Cobb County Bus dropped the family off directly across from their home in the Somerpoint Apartments. The bus stop is in the middle of the block, and four lanes of highway and a concrete median strip with a turning lane separated them from home. In order to use the cross walk, the tired family needed to walk three-tenths of a mile in one direction to get to the intersection, and three-tenths of a mile back to their apartment. In other words, they would have had to walk more than half a mile to get to their home, which they could see from the bus stop.Along with most of the other bus riders dropped off at the time, they made the fateful decision to cross in the middle of the street. They crossed the first two lanes and waited in the median. One girl ran out into the street, and A.J. ran out after her. The boy was hit by a passing van, which left the scene of the accident; he died of his injuries later at the hospital.The driver was found and arrested. He admitted hitting the child, as well as drinking alcohol earlier that day and using prescription pain killers. The court sentenced him to six months in prison, and he was released the following October. Ms. Nelson was convicted of reckless conduct, improperly crossing a roadway, and second-degree vehicular homicide. She faced up to 36 months in prison.No, that is not a misprint.Raquel Nelson lost her four-year-old son in a traffic accident and was set to be sent to prison for what was, in effect, the crime of being a pedestrian. The court, in the event, gave her probation.There are issues of justice involved here, but this is primarily an issue of design: we have designed our cities and towns around cars and not around people. We have made it dangerous to be pedestrians like Raquel Nelson and her children, and this danger holds for all those who physically cannot drive, those who cannot afford to drive, and those who don’t care to drive. Since our decision to become a car-based culture following World War II, we have consistently changed our built environment to cater to cars, particularly to enable them to go faster, with wider lanes, faster speed limits, and fewer stops. In rural areas this is eminently appropriate, but we have done so in densely populated areas as well. As speeds rise, fatality rates skyrocket: 5% of pedestrians hit by a car going 20 mph die; at 40 mph, the fatality rate jumps to 83%.We need leaders who are aware of and can advocate for policies that foster walkable, sustainable neighborhoods, and who can teach this way of thinking to others. That’s what it has to do with the church.The New Urbanism is not everything: it is not the Kingdom of God come in its fullness. But issues of humane urban design, including pedestrian safety, public transit, walkability, livability, sustainability, even attractive and charming places to live and visit, ought to be the concern of all those who take seriously Jesus’ commands to love our neighbor, the stranger, and even our enemy. This is one more way that the church can learn to see, love and serve well the place to which God calls us.— The Rev. Dr. Jason Fout is assistant professor of Anglican theology at Bexley Hall in Columbus, Ohio. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Grant Humphreys says: Submit an Event Listing The New Urbanism and the church Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ April 21, 2012 at 10:52 am The message in this article is compelling, and yet another example of how we can facilitate social Justice. There really are so many ways. Do we just shake our heads and say “what a shame?” Or do we pull together what resources we’ve been given and do something about it. Christopher C. Miller says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 April 20, 2012 at 11:13 pm Great article. I’m happy to see this coming up! This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 thomas mauro says: Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK April 20, 2012 at 8:55 pm My husband, who is an urban planner, considers the work of designing and maintaining truly liveable communities to be a ministry. This is an issue of justice, and the church has a role. Thank you, Jason – well said! Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA April 20, 2012 at 10:36 pm Thanks for shedding light on the importance of the Church’s role in shaping the built environment. Great post. Tragic and heart-breaking story. We live in a broken world and we’re called to make it a better place for everyone. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA James Rodgers says: April 25, 2012 at 11:13 pm The built environment is another aspect of what it is in which the Kingdom of God emerges. Glad for your interest and insight. Visit my site to find others in this work: http://civismandcities.wordpress.com/center_img Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By Jason FoutPosted Apr 20, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (5) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Cynthia Hallas says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

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Data Protection Evolution in the Coming Decade – Part 4

first_imgIn part 3 of this blog series we discussed our vision for future data protection.It will be a multi-year effort to fully realize, but our early efforts in this journey are already starting to bear fruit. Recently we released support for the protection of Kubernetes containers on VMware – a first-to-market data protection solution that will enable our customers to accelerate innovation and increase their agility across multi-cloud environments by leveraging containers for application deployments while ensuring the protection of critical data wherever containers are deployed.Going forward, our customers can expect to see a steady stream of new data protection capabilities being released on a quarterly basis as we continue to prime the pump of our agile software development engine. As we build for the future, it is important to point out that our industry leading data protection solutions continue to simplify the protection and security of critical workloads and data across private, public and hybrid cloud environments, while dramatically lowering the cost of protection in the cloud.Consider the four key capabilities that Dell EMC Data Protection solutions deliver to our customers today:1) Dell EMC Data Protection is native to the cloudIndustry-leading Dell EMC cloud data protection solutions are used by over 1,000 customers to protect over 2.7 Exabytes in the public cloud. The seamless integration with the cloud ecosystem and marketplace enables users to simply and rapidly install solutions such as PowerProtect DD Virtual Edition to efficiently  protect applications and data in the public cloud while significantly reducing costs.Additionally, born-in-the-cloud workloads leveraging public cloud snapshots can be seamlessly protected using PowerProtect Cloud Snapshot Manager,  a Dell EMC SaaS offering that automatically discovers, assigns policies and protects public cloud workloads and data across multiple clouds.And in a recent first-to-market solution, Dell Technologies delivers data protection support for Kubernetes containers through PowerProtect Data Manager. This gives organizations the ability to deploy workloads on containers across any cloud – private, public or hybrid – and ensure the rapid protection and recovery of the mission-critical data running on containers in edge, core and multi-cloud environments.2) Dell Technologies is the only vendor with a full spectrum of data protection solutionsSupporting full business service protection from edge to core to cloud, requires solutions that entail backup and recovery as well as disaster recovery and orchestration. Dell Technologies has leading products in both spaces that will ultimately be fully integrated into PowerProtect Data Manager.A single product will provide a full continuum of data protection capabilities with continuous data protection, to deliver extremely robust recovery point and recovery time objectives, with automated backup and recovery, for the protection, compliance and security of mission-critical data assets across hybrid, multi-cloud environments. These capabilities will be further augmented through our Cloud DR offering, where the whole workload environment can be recreated in the cloud directly from backup copies.3) Intelligent protection and recovery  Autonomous protection and recovery will free users from the day-to-day burdens of data protection management. It all starts by making the underlying hardware infrastructure self-managing. Dell Technologies delivers this capability today by leveraging AI/ML-based automation to proactively detect hardware-related issues and provide predictive maintenance and resource management on the Dell EMC PowerProtect DD appliance family.We plan to deliver increasingly higher levels of automation by using AI/ML to analyze data protection usage and policy patterns in order to better predict the required policies and SLAs for supporting workloads across edge, core and multi-cloud. This will be built on PowerProtect Central, a SaaS platform that collects and analyzes behavioral patterns across multi-cloud environments (while of course complying with all required privacy and security measures).4) Data management and securityCyber threats are becoming increasingly pervasive. Organizations of all sizes now report that they are regularly targeted with malware and ransomware attacks. Protecting data means more than performing daily backup operations, it also means safeguarding data from a broad range of cyber threats.Dell Technologies delivers solutions that are integrating data protection (backup) with security into a more holistic approach for safeguarding data. PowerProtect Cyber Recovery integrates data protection storage with air-gapped data protection to prevent malicious deletion of backup copies, as well as malware detection mechanisms to ensure backup copies are clean and ready for recovery. Additional enhancements are planned through the collaboration of Dell EMC with VMware, SecureWorks and RSA.Proven and Modern Data ProtectionAs we enter the data decade, we are increasingly mindful of the pivotal role data will play in opening new frontiers in advancing human progress. From making affordable, quality health care available to billions of people globally, to delivering breakthrough advancements in eco-friendly, sustainable food production, to helping illuminate the minds of underprivileged youth across every corner of the globe –  it all starts with data. That is why we do what we do. Our mission is connected to safeguarding the critical data assets that will make these aspirations, and many more like it, a reality in the coming years.We are tremendously excited, energized and humbled to be the industry leader delivering today’s proven data protection solutions, while developing the modern data protection capabilities organizations need so that our customers can focus on what they do best.last_img read more

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A healthy Garrett Richards opens Angels’ season with optimism

first_img Angels hope newcomers can boost offense, key improvement in 2018 A look at the 2018 Angels, position by position He will bring all that to the mound on Thursday against the Oakland A’s, throwing the first pitch of the Angels’ season.“I know what I can do when I’m on the mound,” he said. “I think everybody knows that. The name of the game is staying healthy, and that’s what I’m concentrating on now.”The skeptics will say they have heard this before. A year ago, in fact, Richards seemed to be a stem-cell therapy success story, avoiding Tommy John surgery to make a healthy debut. He was not even five innings into his season when he walked off the mound with a trainer, not to return until September.While he was out, Richards heard all the critics say he should have just had Tommy John surgery in 2016, but he has no regrets. The injuries of 2016 and 2017 were, he said, “totally unrelated. Two different body parts.”Richards insisted repeatedly last year, and again this spring, that last year’s biceps nerve issue was a fluke, one that took weeks to adequately diagnose. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ 2018 schedule “I am just going to go put up numbers,” he said. “I’m sure at some point we’ll talk about something. … I’m interested to see whatever the appeal of free agency is, but this is all I’ve ever known. It has sentimental value. I have known everybody around here since the minor leagues. This is a place I’d like to stay, but sometimes it works out differently. This is a business. We’ll just see what happens.”At the moment, Richards’ value is hard to assess because of all the injuries. He is clearly a No. 1 starter, a pitcher Scioscia recently called the “lead dog” of his staff.Richards knows as well as anyone that he needs to stay healthy to reach the stature in the game that his talent would suggest.That starts with getting through Thursday’s game. He was hurt in his first start in 2017, on the same mound he’ll be taking for this game.“Right now,” he said, “it’s all about taking it one day at a time, and making sure I recover and do all the things in between that will make me successful and healthy on Day 5.” OAKLAND — On a team whose starting pitchers have been victims of a raft of injuries over the past few years, Garrett Richards stands alone in a couple ways.He’s had the most serious injuries. He’s also performed the best when healthy.The confluence of those facts brings Richards to the forefront of any discussion about how good the Angels can be.If only Richards could stay healthy, Angels fans lament, he has the stuff to be an ace. In between stints on the disabled list, Richards has managed a career that matches up with some of the game’s Cy Young-winning elite. His 96 mph fastballs and sharp sliders compose a dominant arsenal, one to which he’s worked to add a curve ball this spring. Now, Richards is beginning a season after a winter of increased flexibility training, which he hopes will keep him healthy. The Angels also plan to use a six-man rotation, which will often give Richards and the other starters another day of recovery.After tearing a tendon in his knee in 2014, blowing out his elbow in 2016 and suffering the nerve issue in 2017, Richards figures he’s due for some good luck, too.“Hopefully,” he quipped, “everything works in threes, and I’m done. … Hopefully the other stuff is behind me, and I can get back on track.”He’s been gone for so long – just 12 starts in the past two seasons – that it’s easy to forget just what it looks like when he is “on track.”Since Richards became a full-time starter in July 2013, he has a 3.16 ERA over 83 starts. To put that into context, only 14 pitchers have started at least 80 games in the past four years with an ERA of 3.16 or better.Among them: Clayton Kershaw, Zack Greinke, Max Scherzer, Corey Kluber, Madison Bumgarner, Dallas Keuchel, Chris Sale and Jake Arrieta.Among the pitchers with a worse ERA than Richards over the past four years: Felix Hernandez, David Price, Cole Hamels, Gerrit Cole and Justin Verlander.Richards’ consistency is also notable. He’s allowed three runs or less in 76 percent of his starts since becoming a full-time starter. The major league average is 64 percent. The Angels have a .566 winning percentage in his starts over that span, and for much of that time they haven’t had an offense or defense as good as they believe they have now.If the Angels get a healthy Richards for 25 to 30 starts, they have essentially acquired an ace. Richards’ teammates want to see this for the obvious reason that it will make their team better, but also because they want to see a friend who has suffered so much rewarded.“We saw what he can do a few years ago, being healthy,” fellow starter Matt Shoemaker said. “I want to see him go out and dominate, and us go out and dominate. Knowing the capability is there, it’s exciting.”In 2014, Richards was enjoying his breakout season, posting a 2.61 ERA through 26 starts. He didn’t get a chance to finish that season after he crumpled to the ground at Fenway Park, his knee shredded when he twisted it covering first base.In 2015, he started 32 games and pitched 207-1/3 innings, posting a 3.65 ERA. Since then, even though he’s started just 12 times because of the injuries, he has a 2.31 ERA in those games.The fact that Richards has been consistently good, even when pitching sporadically around injuries, gives him and the Angels hope.“It’s not just potential,” Manager Mike Scioscia said. “If you look at the season Garrett was putting together in 2014, it’s very real. Hopefully he’s going to be throwing the ball as well as he has all spring, and stay healthy. And we’re very confident he will.”If that’s the case, it is going to prompt the next question: will the Angels re-sign him?Richards, 29, is eligible for free agency at the end of the 2018 season. He said the Angels have not approached him about an extension, but he’s certainly ready to listen. He’s been with the organization since it drafted him in 2009.Related Articles Shohei Ohtani will start Sunday, but Angels’ eventual six-man starting rotation still short on details last_img read more

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