What I’ll do if the FTSE 100 crashes to 5,000 points

first_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images Alan Oscroft | Tuesday, 10th March, 2020 On Monday, the FTSE 100 crashed to a low of 5,891.6 points at one stage, and closed below 6,000 points for the first time since 2016. At the end of the day, London’s top index had fallen 7.7%.Past FTSE 100 crashesBut we’ve had one-day FTSE 100 crashes bigger than that plenty of times, and we’ve always got over them. According to data from Refinitiv, we’ve got to go back as far as 2008 for a worse fall. On 6 October that year, the FTSE 100 lost 7.9%. But since then, the index is up 40% — even after the coronavirus crash.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…As I write on Tuesday morning, the headlines are shouting “Global stocks rebound”, and the Footsie is up 3.8% at 6,195 points. Whenever there’s a panic sell-off of stocks, they always seem to rebound shortly after. It’s been that way for as long as I’ve been following UK shares, and I expect it to continue.Why then do investors do it? If the FTSE 100 has always come back from every fall throughout its history, why do people sell out and then buy back in again? Why not just keep hold of your shares and save two sets of transaction costs?Short-term fearI’ve been asking that question since before I bought my first share, and I still have no good answer. The obvious reason is that investors fear they’ll face further short-term losses unless they sell. But trying to time things so you get out before the bottom, and then buy back in again at a lower price, is almost impossible. So what should we do?For me, the answer is simple. As long as I’m still investing for the long term, I’ll be looking to buy more shares at lower prices. I’ll do my research by examining individual companies and, when I see great ones for sale at bargain prices, I’ll be a buyer.That was my approach before the latest crash, and I see no reason to change it now. We never know when the next stock market slump is going to come along, and it could very well be tomorrow.FTSE 100 crash tomorrow?So what if Tuesday’s gain is just a one-day respite before the FTSE plunges further? What if it crashes as far as 5,000 points and below? We’ve seen levels that low as recently as 2010, and the banking crisis sent the index plummeting below 4,000 at one point.At the time, I couldn’t believe my luck seeing so many shares at super bargain prices. I didn’t have a lot of spare cash at the time. But what I did have went into top dividend shares, and I’ve been enjoying elevated yields from them since. If it happens again I’ll be in a better position to benefit, with a decent chunk of pension cash waiting to be invested.A FTSE fall to 5,000 would be a drop of almost 20%. Just think how wonderful it would be to be able to buy today’s top FTSE 100 stocks in a ‘20% off’ sale. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Sharescenter_img Views expressed in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. See all posts by Alan Oscroft Enter Your Email Address What I’ll do if the FTSE 100 crashes to 5,000 points “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”last_img read more

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Australian Open: Novak Djokovic beats Lucas Pouille, will face Rafael Nadal in final

first_img Written by January 25, 2019 /Sports News – National Australian Open: Novak Djokovic beats Lucas Pouille, will face Rafael Nadal in final FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailTPN/Getty Images(MELBOURNE, Australia) — The stage has been set for the Australian Open final on Sunday.Novak Djokovic advanced to the championship match on Friday after dominating France’s Lucas Pouille in three straight sets, 6-0, 6-2, 6-2, in the semifinals.Djokovic, the top seed in the world, will now face No. 2 seed Rafael Nadal as the two battle it out for the trophy on Sunday. Nadal, 32, advanced to the final on Thursday after defeating Greece’s Stefanos Tsitsipas 6-2, 6-4, 6-0.Djokovic, 31, is seeking his seventh Australian Open title and 15th Grand Slam victory overall. Nadal, meanwhile, is on the quest for his second win in Melbourne and 18th Grand Slam title.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Martin O’Neill won’t allow Republic of Ireland to sit on away-goals advantage

first_img Asked about his pride should his team complete the job, O’Neill said: “My pride in the side has been there from the start. I think the players have wanted to play. “There was a feeling beforehand that some players just weren’t that bothered about playing for their country – I haven’t witnessed it and I haven’t experienced it in the two years that I’ve been here. “Obviously, it would be terrific if we could do it, but I have to be very, very mindful of the fact that we are a long way away from doing that. “We have to put things into perspective: Bosnia are capable of scoring, they could wipe that advantage, that away goal that we have within minutes of the game, and then suddenly they are on the front foot. “If we think that we can keep them out for 90 minutes and camp ourselves just outside our own penalty area, that would be a recipe for disaster. “We have to consider being really on the front foot, genuinely, and going and trying to win this game, and that’s it. “If you’d thought that we’d have to win in the Aviva for the final time, you probably would have taken that.” O’Neill will go into the game with Jonathan Walters available after suspension. John O’Shea, who was also banned for the first leg, and Shane Long trained in Abbotstown on Sunday morning as they continue their respective recoveries from hamstring and foot injuries. Martin O’Neill has warned the Republic of Ireland that relying on their away goal against Bosnia-Herzegovina to secure a ticket to the Euro 2016 finals would be “a recipe for disaster”. Press Association For the likes of 34-year-old O’Shea and skipper Robbie Keane, who is a year older, it could prove to be their final appearance in an Ireland shirt if they do not make the finals, but there will be no room for sentiment in the manager’s team selection. O’Neill said: “That’s called tough luck, just tough luck. I’m not going to put players in because it might be their last international game. “I’ll put them in hopefully on merit and hopefully the experience that they have garnered over the last 10 or 12 or 15 years could stand us in a bit of decent stead. That would be the reason. “I think the motivation is there. If we are beaten here, it won’t be through lack of trying. We might lack a few things in our side, but a bit of strength of character I think is there.” Long, who has not played any football since limping off in Poland on October 11, could prove vital with Daryl Murphy, who started in Zenica, sitting out training on Sunday with a calf injury, although O’Neill confirmed that was purely precautionary. However, the Ireland boss will have to come up with a team which strikes the right balance between potency in attack and solidity at the back with right-winger Edin Visca a particular focus following his eye-catching display at the Bilino Polje Stadium. He said: “They raid down the right-hand side because they’ve got a very, very fine right winger. What they want to do is try to get it out to the little lad, who is exceptionally talented. “I think he could cause problems to anybody.” The Republic returned from Zenica on Friday night with a 1-1 draw having come within three minutes of a victory which might have made their task in the second leg at the Aviva Stadium on Monday slightly more straightforward. They nevertheless enjoy a marginal advantage having scored in Bosnia, although their 63-year-old manager has insisted they cannot afford to play for the 0-0 draw which would guarantee a trip to France along with England, Northern Ireland and Wales next summer. last_img read more

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