Tackling debate: Rugby is a collision sport, but it’s safer than ever

first_imgThe message should very much be, play on. Competition: Kids thrive from the physical nature of rugby Professor Allyson Pollock’s recent demands to ban tackling in schools sparked fierce debate and a robust defence from the rugby community The now annual rallying call by Professor Allyson Pollock to ban tackling in schools reared its divisive head again this week.Professor Pollock – who is promoting a book – did her usual round robin of media outlets to outline why rugby, as a collision sport, should be doing more to protect our budding progeny from injury.Of course Professor Pollock is justified to her opinions, based, she tells us on extensive qualitative research but her argument can only hold sway for so much and has to be offset with rugby’s enduring qualities that are far less measurable.I must divulge that I played mini rugby from the age of six, and had my fair share of bumps and bruises (dislocated shoulder, multiple broken noses, knee surgery). Perhaps I should be wary my 10-year-old son is following in his father and grandfather’s footsteps by playing the game, but I couldn’t be happier.Step by step: Children are introduced tag rugby firstI worry, like any parent, at the increasingly physical nature of the game – he’s come off injured twice in four years playing – but the growing bond he has developed with his teammates and the ethics he’s learning of respecting the referee, shaking the hands of opponents, not to mention a couple of hours of exercise a week, are all character-forming values he will not learn playing FIFA ’17 on X-Box.Rugby’s administrators should be given their dues – goodness knows, they get a shellacking when they get things wrong. They are trying to make the game safer at mini-rugby level with a glut of courses, aimed at making our rough-house game as responsible as possible.One of my earliest memories was losing two teeth attempting a tackle from behind when a rogue Patrick boot clocked me in the chops. Fast-forward a generation and youngsters have two years of tag-rugby before contact, where all coaches are expected to take a Rugby Ready course, followed by a gradual introduction to safe tackling; routinely drumming in the need to go ‘cheek to cheek’, wrapping your arms around the ball carrier, getting your head on the right side and falling correctly.Next generation: Assuring parents that rugby is a safe sport is a challengeInstilling correct technique at a young age makes tackling instinctive and starting that in your late teens, as Professor Pollock argues, could well be counterproductive and lead to injury rates rising, rather than falling. TAGS: Highlight There is also the point that rugby helps young adolescents looking for a place in society, some whose natural métier is not in academia, or other larger-boned youngsters who feel like they do not fit into sports better suited to their lithe-limbed friends. Others with anger-management issues, or just testosterone surges, have a place to safely expend that pent up aggression in a controlled manner.As a club, Hitchin RFC boasts over 600 Mini and Youth members, and with over 50 boys in our U11 age-group. The social and health benefits of the game on the boys and girls are clear to see, and they love the physical element of the game. ‘When are we starting contact?’ the most commonly-asked question in pre-season.Fair play: Hitchin U10’s at the Holt mini rugby festival in May 2017Someone who plays his rugby down the road, and is one of the best defensive midfielders in the game, is Brad Barritt. The Saracens centre has suffered his fair share of blood injuries and gave a considered response to the furore, when I caught up with him at the Champions Cup launch. “I must firstly say, any viewpoint is coming from a caring, safe perspective and that’s great. The welfare of people is more important than any sporting code.”Barritt however, agreed that if technique is taught at a very young age it will only aid his future development as a rugby player. “If you’re kept away from the technique of having to tackle until your teens, it’s less instinctive. I can only think of my childhood in South Africa, where I played rugby from the age of five. The collisions aren’t as big. There are 30 kids honey potting around the ball. That early technique, coached correctly will prevent injuries in the future. My concern is if bodies get bigger and impacts more pronounced, tackling technique may not be as ingrained as it should be. I completely support anything that makes the game safer. In the past, perhaps tackling has been neglected; everyone loves the glamour of kicking and passing, but those fundamentals in terms of defence, are now more important than ever.”Tough customer: Brad Barritt has had his share of bumps and welcomes a safer gameThe countdown is now on for Professor Pollock’s next missive, and rugby as a sport needs to redouble its efforts to put safety at the heart of the game without taking away its compelling physical nature. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

See More

PilMa House / Azootea

first_imgArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/586216/pilma-house-azootea Clipboard Spain “COPY” PilMa House / Azootea ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/586216/pilma-house-azootea Clipboard Save this picture!© Paula Arroyo+ 16 Share Photographs:  Paula ArroyoConstruction:Navas 3000 s.l.Structures:Jofemar s.l.Technical Architect:Alarifes s.l.p.Architects:Berta González Salinero, Alegría Zorrilla MirasCity:ValdilechaCountry:SpainMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Paula ArroyoRecommended ProductsDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Curved Hinged Door | AlbaDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteDoorsLonghiDoor – HeadlineText description provided by the architects. The site is located on the edge of the urban area, in a lot with steep slopes and natural caves. The proposal responds to this boundary condition: Firstly a system of concatenated walls and concrete slabs break and compensate the pressure of the earth, and take advantage of its thermal inertia like the caves in the area.Save this picture!© Paula ArroyoFurthermore, a light wooden structure sets the friendly and urban part of the intervention. Thus, the first floor houses the damp program, kitchen and bathrooms, while the second contains the dry program, living area and bedrooms.Save this picture!PlanThe dwelling is closed to its nearby environment turning to a courtyard, which is the central space of the house, ensuring lighting and cross ventilation in all rooms, and functions as expansion space for the house during the warmer months. However, the house opens into the distant landscape through the roof garden.Save this picture!© Paula ArroyoProject gallerySee allShow less71 Above Restaurant / Tag Front ArchitectsSelected ProjectsIT HQ / Morpho StudioSelected Projects Share CopyAbout this officeAzooteaOfficeFollowProductsWoodGlassConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesValdilechaSpainPublished on January 16, 2015Cite: “PilMa House / Azootea” [CASA PilMa / Azootea] 16 Jan 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogVentilated / Double Skin FacadeTechnowoodProfile Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar PanelsMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalFiber Cements / CementsEQUITONEFiber Cement Facade Panel PicturaCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemConcreteKrytonSmart ConcreteSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – B-ClassMetal PanelsLorin IndustriesAnodized Aluminum – Stainless Steel FinishesWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Mass TimberWindowspanoramah!®ah!38 – FlexibilityChairsSellexChair – IrinaBathroom FurnitureKaleBathroom Cabinets – ZeroMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream CopyHouses•Valdilecha, Spaincenter_img PilMa House / AzooteaSave this projectSavePilMa House / Azootea Photographs Architects: Azootea Year Completion year of this architecture project Houses “COPY” Projects 2014 Year: last_img read more

See More

GOP Just Keeps Pushing Financial Reform

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / GOP Just Keeps Pushing Financial Reform Financial Reform Financial Stability Oversight Council H.R. 3340 U.S. House of Representatives 2016-04-19 Brian Honea Subscribe Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago GOP Just Keeps Pushing Financial Reform Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: Financial Reform Financial Stability Oversight Council H.R. 3340 U.S. House of Representatives Republicans have been trying to chip away at the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act ever since it was passed nearly six years ago, and they have been making some headway in the last month.The latest victory for the GOP in their fight against Dodd-Frank came in the House of Representatives recently when H.R. 3340, known as the Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) Reform Act, passed by a vote of 239 to 179. The bill was introduced by Rep. Tom Emmer (R-Minnesota) in July 2015 and it passed in the House Financial Services Committee in November.The FSOC, which was created by Dodd-Frank in 2010 along with the Office of Financial Research (OFR), has the power to designate certain financial institutions as “systemically important,” which increases the regulatory burdens for those institutions. H.R. 3340 amends the Financial Stability Act of 2010 and requires the budgets of both the FSOC and the OFR subject to the annual appropriations process; it also establishes requirements for reports and a public notice and comment period.“I am a firm believer in a transparent and accountable government, and if a federal institution is failing to meet these fundamental criteria, Congress needs to fix it,” Emmer said. “Unfortunately, FSOC and OFR currently operate in the shadows, outside of the usual congressional oversight and the democratic process. I cannot stand by while businesses that had nothing to do with the 2008 financial crisis are being unjustly burdened with new regulations that result in Americans paying higher prices for essential financial products like home mortgages, as well as education, auto and business loans.”“I am a firm believer in a transparent and accountable government, and if a federal institution is failing to meet these fundamental criteria, Congress needs to fix it.”Rep. Tom Emmer (R-Minnesota)Emmer continued, “Over the years, Congress has given much of its authority to unelected bureaucrats but this legislation returns the Constitutional ‘power of the purse’ back to Congress. Not only will this legislation reduce mandatory spending by $1.3 billion over the next ten years, but it will make FSOC and OFR transparent and accountable to the American people. Subjecting these entities to the congressional appropriations process, enhancing OFR quarterly reporting requirements and allowing Americans to weigh in on OFR rules and regulations gives Congress the tools it needs to provide the proper oversight of FSOC and OFR.”H.R. 3340, like most proposed legislation that involves financial reform that rolls back Dodd-Frank, passed with an almost exclusively partisan vote. Out of the 239 yeas, only one Democrat voted in favor of it (Rep. Henry Cuellar from Texas), and out of the 179 nays, only one Republican voted against it (Rep. Walter Jones of North Carolina).The passage of H.R. 3340 in the House is the latest in a series of setbacks for Dodd-Frank. Last week, the House Financial Services Committee passed a bill to repeal Dodd-Frank’s bailout fund for large, complex financial institutions. At the same time, the Committee passed a bill to put the CFPB’s spending on a budget in an attempt to make the Bureau more accountable to taxpayers.In late March, a judge dealt a blow to Dodd-Frank and the FSOC when she ordered the “systemically important” designation to be removed from insurance provider MetLife. The FSOC designated MetLife as a nonbank systemically important institution in December 2014 and MetLife had fought to have it removed since.  Print This Post Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agocenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Brian Honea April 19, 2016 1,272 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Why Will Principal Reduction Benefit So Few Borrowers? Next: DS News Webcast: Wednesday 4/20/2016 The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News Sign up for DS News Daily last_img read more

See More