Watch Jerry Garcia And Phil Lesh Explain The Origins Of “Grateful Dead” In Clip From New Documentary

first_imgAfter years and years of anticipation, delays, and a variety of obstacles, the long-awaited Grateful Dead documentary Long Strange Trip will be made available to the public on May 26th via Amazon Prime Video. The film, produced by legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese and directed by Amir Bar-Lev, made its debut at the acclaimed Sundance Film Festival earlier this year to glowing reviews. Running nearly four hours in length, this sprawling look at the history of one of the most influential bands in American music history features in-depth interviews from roadies, band members and extended Dead family members, along with incredible unseen behind-the-scenes and live footage spanning from the band members’ childhood through the various rungs of their climb to success.Long Awaited Grateful Dead Documentary Will Soon Be Available On AmazonEarlier this week, Entertainment Weekly posted an exclusive clip from the movie, which features interspersed video interviews of Garcia (from the ’90s) and bassist Phil Lesh (in the present day) talking about the origin of the band’s name. As they explain in the clip, the band had been using the name The Warlocks, but after discovering another group with that name, they had to pick a new moniker. While brainstorming ideas, Jerry opened a dictionary to a random page, and written on the page, nestled in the small print, were the words “Grateful Dead.” You can check out the clip below, via EW:The movie is broken into six distinct parts, touching on Jerry Garcia’s well documented history of drug addiction, the complications of the band’s increased popularity in the 80s and the unique community that grew an unwieldy size by the early 90s. While the film’s scope is wider than any film about the band to date, it is less concerned with displaying a detailed chronology of The Grateful Dead and more focused on conveying the bands adventurous and idiosyncratic essence–how their music manifested as a truly communal artistic effort, and garnered a following closer to that of a religion than that of a rock and roll band. As clips, clues, and reviews continue to surface ahead of its public release, our level of excitement could not be higher for the long-awaited Long Strange Trip this May![h/t – Entertainment Weekly]last_img read more

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Oil’s apocalyptic April could reverberate for years to come

first_imgTopics : The demand slump is being exacerbated by former OPEC+ allies Saudi Arabia and Russia pumping as much crude as they can in a battle for market share, heaping additional pressure on shipping, tanks and pipelines. Goldman sees around 20 million barrels a day flowing into storage in April, while IHS Markit expects the world will run out of space to store oil by the middle of the year.Few in the industry will be spared. April is also set to be the worst ever month for global jet fuel demand, while industry consultant FGE forecasts American gasoline consumption will plunge by 50% from a year earlier. Energy Aspects Ltd. predicts global benchmark Brent crude may drop to near $10 a barrel, a level not seen in more than two decades.The April crash sets up a bleak second quarter for the market, potentially causing some producers to go to the wall and destabilizing governments in many OPEC nations. A near-term recovery in prices seems unlikely, with around 70% of 130 respondents to a Bloomberg Intelligence survey saying they see Brent still below $30 a barrel by June.About 70% of Bloomberg Intelligence’s 130 survey respondents see Brent below $30 by June, prior to OPEC’s next meeting. With the world’s biggest economies in lockdown due to Covid-19 and Brent at a 17-year low, a near-term recovery seems unlikely as demand remains in free-fall and Saudi Arabia and Russia entrench supply dominance.While the crisis will see the energy industry finally achieve the restructuring it so badly needs, according to Goldman, the push for de-carbonization could hinder its recovery when demand returns. Oil is entering a period of unparalleled demand destruction this month that promises to transform the industry for years to come.Daily consumption will plummet by 15 million to 22 million barrels in April from a year earlier, according to estimates from some of the world’s most influential energy analysts. The crash has already led to refiners slashing processing, drillers halting output and storage tanks swelling across the world.“This will likely be a game-changer for the industry,” Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analysts including Jeffrey Currie and Damien Courvalin said in a March 30 note. “It is impossible to shut down that much demand without large and persistent ramifications to supply.”last_img read more

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