Watch Jerry Garcia And Phil Lesh Explain The Origins Of “Grateful Dead” In Clip From New Documentary

first_imgAfter years and years of anticipation, delays, and a variety of obstacles, the long-awaited Grateful Dead documentary Long Strange Trip will be made available to the public on May 26th via Amazon Prime Video. The film, produced by legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese and directed by Amir Bar-Lev, made its debut at the acclaimed Sundance Film Festival earlier this year to glowing reviews. Running nearly four hours in length, this sprawling look at the history of one of the most influential bands in American music history features in-depth interviews from roadies, band members and extended Dead family members, along with incredible unseen behind-the-scenes and live footage spanning from the band members’ childhood through the various rungs of their climb to success.Long Awaited Grateful Dead Documentary Will Soon Be Available On AmazonEarlier this week, Entertainment Weekly posted an exclusive clip from the movie, which features interspersed video interviews of Garcia (from the ’90s) and bassist Phil Lesh (in the present day) talking about the origin of the band’s name. As they explain in the clip, the band had been using the name The Warlocks, but after discovering another group with that name, they had to pick a new moniker. While brainstorming ideas, Jerry opened a dictionary to a random page, and written on the page, nestled in the small print, were the words “Grateful Dead.” You can check out the clip below, via EW:The movie is broken into six distinct parts, touching on Jerry Garcia’s well documented history of drug addiction, the complications of the band’s increased popularity in the 80s and the unique community that grew an unwieldy size by the early 90s. While the film’s scope is wider than any film about the band to date, it is less concerned with displaying a detailed chronology of The Grateful Dead and more focused on conveying the bands adventurous and idiosyncratic essence–how their music manifested as a truly communal artistic effort, and garnered a following closer to that of a religion than that of a rock and roll band. As clips, clues, and reviews continue to surface ahead of its public release, our level of excitement could not be higher for the long-awaited Long Strange Trip this May![h/t – Entertainment Weekly]last_img read more

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Safer Hispanic workers

first_imgWorkers are young and productive”From class surveys, we’ve seen that some of these Hispanicworkers have technical school or college degrees,” Martinez said.”Most are young, single and in the prime of their productivity.They can easily work 14 hour days at strong, labor-intensivework.”Most say they’re in the United States to work so they can sendmoney back home to their families. Their goal is to return home.”Regardless of why they’re here, they’re here and working in avital industry, and they need to be trained,” he said.Fonseca, who began training Hispanic landscape and greenhouseworkers as a Cherokee County extension agent, said the trainingneeds are great.”The poultry industry in the state has the need, too,” he said.”The majority of their workers are now Hispanic.” By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaA $105,000 Occupational Safety and Health Administration grantwill help University of Georgia faculty members accomplish whatthey’ve been trying to do on a shoestring budget: train thestate’s Hispanic landscape workers.OSHA’s Susan Harwood Training Grants focus on improving workers’on-the-job safety records. Plant pathologist Alfredo Martinezserves as the project director for UGA.The project is aimed at reducing equipment- and driving-relatedinjuries and the misuse of pesticides and unnecessary exposure tothem. 75 percent of the work force”Of the 65,000 workers in the state’s green industry, 75 percentare Hispanic,” Martinez said. “As three-fourths of the work force,Hispanics are the backbone of this industry.”The turf, ornamental and landscape companies that make upGeorgia’s green industry are among the fastest-growing in thestate.And the trainings don’t just help those companies and theirworkers. It’s important to everyone around them that theseworkers are trained to work safely, Martinez said.”Every day,” he said, “they’re mixing chemicals and using heavyequipment and tools with rather limited training.”Business owners are eager to have their Hispanic workers trained,he said. The lower insurance premiums and other benefits ofreducing accidents are easy for them to see.Martinez, horticulturist Marco Fonseca and other UGA colleagueshave trained Hispanic workers for years through programs in theUGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Bilingual training materials”We plan to develop more in-depth trainings that include manualsin both Spanish and English,” he said.The HSG specialists plan to train both the Hispanic workers andtheir managers. “We’ve developed a training for managers thatfocuses on understanding cultural differences,” Fonseca said.”These things affect production and safety.”Over the past two years, the group has reached more than 500Hispanic workers.”The workers have learned to trust us, and they’re no longerafraid to approach us,” Martinez said. “I get four to six calls aweek from Hispanics I have met who have questions and need moreinformation.”Of the Hispanic workers who have come to his trainings, Martinezsaid, 75 percent are Mexican. The rest are from Central or SouthAmerica. Hispanic Specialists GroupTwo years ago, they formed Georgia’s Hispanic SpecialistsGroup tounify their efforts.Jorge Atiles, an extension housing specialist with the UGACollege of Family and Consumer Sciences, helped with the grantprocess. Martinez, Fonseca and Atiles have both professional andpersonal reasons to see the program succeed.They work closely with the green industry in their UGA programs,and they’re all Hispanic. Martinez is from Mexico, FonsecaHonduras and Atiles the Dominican Republic.”The Hispanic work force in Georgia has grown 300 percent overthe past decade,” Fonseca said. “They’re a very important laborforce to agribusinesses in the state. And the UGA ExtensionService is in the position to deliver training to them across thestate where it is desperately needed.”In the past, the group trained Hispanic workers primarily onproper pesticide handling. With the grant, Martinez sees morepossibilities.last_img read more

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Lawn care equipment stolen from Binghamton Boys and Girls Club

first_imgBINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Boys and Girls Club of Binghamton says they had hundreds of dollars of equipment stolen from a shed on the club’s property. Staff says someone broke the lock on the club’s equipment shed late last week and stole several blowers, a weed wacker, several sets of hedge trimmers, and a portable welder among other equipment. “Anyone who would steal from the Boys and Girls Club doesn’t belong walking the streets,” he said. “It’s a place where kids who don’t have much come to have a good time with their peers and the staff that work here, you just don’t take from a place like that.” Unit Director Roberto Sostre says while he also uses the equipment for his own landscaping work, he can’t understand why anyone would steal property belonging to an organization like the Boys and Girls Club. The Binghamton Police department says they are currently investigating the theft, if you have any information you can call the detective division at (607) 772-7080.last_img read more

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