HMS Northumberland gets underway for Cutlass Fury 2019

first_img Royal Navy frigate deploys for major anti-submarine warfare drill off Canada View post tag: Cutlass Fury navaltoday Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today Royal Navy frigate deploys for major anti-submarine warfare drill off Canada Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Northumberland departed Plymouth on August 28 to take part in one of the largest anti-submarine warfare maneuvers in the North Atlantic.The frigate will sail 3,000 miles to Nova Scotia, Canada, where it will join forces with other like-minded warships taking part in Cutlass Fury 2019.Every few years the Canadian Atlantic Fleet invites NATO navies to hunt submarines in the challenging waters off their Eastern Seaboard.Cutlass Fury 2019 is the largest such workout since the mid-1990s with 22 warships from Canada, the USA, UK, Spain, France and Germany committed to the 11-day exercise, alongside jets, helicopters and maritime patrol aircraft.The exercise will focus on tactical training meshing different practices, equipment and ideas so that all participants can work together.And to ensure that Cutlass Fury is not all one-way traffic, some of the surface ships will become the hunted as the submarine crews hone their skills.For good measure, air defense, board and search and amphibious operations are also included to test personnel on and above the waves, as well as beneath them.Cutlass Fury leads into Northumberland’s principal mission of the autumn, taking her place in HMS Queen Elizabeth’s carrier strike group as the future flagship conducts training off the coast of the USA on her Westlant 19 deployment.It’s the first duty of Northumberland to shield the carrier task force from the prying eyes of hostile submarines as Queen Elizabeth embarks British front-line F-35B Lightning stealth fighters for the first time.Joining the frigate and the 65,000-tonne carrier will be Type 45 air defense destroyer HMS Dragon, Merlin helicopters from RNAS Culdrose and RNAS Yeovilton, as well as Wildcats from 815 Naval Air Squadron.“HMS Northumberland joining the HMS Queen Elizabeth carrier strike task group is a key milestone in developing the integrated task group capability that will be the centrepiece of Royal Navy operations for the future,” said Commodore Rob Bellfield, Commander Devonport Flotilla.RFA Tideforce will provide tanker support and Lima Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, based in Plymouth and a medical team will also be embarked in the carrier. Share this articlecenter_img View post tag: HMS Northumberland View post tag: Royal Navy August 29, 2019, by View post tag: Westlant View post tag: HMS Queen Elizabethlast_img read more

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Pembroke provides food for 100 homeless people

first_img“I’ve always said that while we have one student in Collegewho needs our support the kitchens here will not shut”, said Kevin Dudley, Pembroke’sExecutive Chef. “We continue to look after those who have had to stay inresidence, and when the Council got in contact about this need in the widercommunity it seemed obvious that we could provide the solution. Pembroke College is providing homeless people in Oxford with three meals a day in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. The College is participating in a Council-run scheme which delivers food to three temporary homeless shelters. An email to Pembroke students suggested that the project may reach 100 people. Dame Lynne Brindley, Master of Pembroke, said: “Everyone inCollege is immensely proud of our catering team who are once again putting inextra effort to show the meaning of being a caring community.” The College is confident that the increased demand on thecatering team will not place staff or the 50 students remaining in college indanger. A College spokesperson confirmed to Cherwell that the smallnumber of staff adhere to social distancing policy and that drivers are askedto clean their hands and are provided with new pairs of gloves at each pick-up. “My team, who are working long shifts with small numbers onduty at a time, have been fantastic in stepping up.”center_img The scheme provides two hot meals and a cold breakfast, which are delivered by volunteer drivers each day. Coordinated by Oxford City Council, the scheme began a two-week trial period on Saturday, with the aim of an extension if successful. Thousands of meals will be provided, offered by the College at cost price. The Council has taken further measures to help homeless people during the crisis. 100 hotel rooms have been leased to provide accommodation, whilst the Porch day centre for homeless and vulnerable people has launched a £20,000 COVID-19 Response Fund. However, the Council reports that some rough sleepers have not yet been accommodated or have refused offers of accommodation. Image Credit to Djr Xi / Wikimedia Commons. License: CC-BY-SA-4.0,3.0,2.5,2.0,1.0.last_img read more

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SportsNation talks Big Ten cities, sports media

first_imgSportsNation host Michelle Beadle sat down with Sports Editor Adam Holt for an exclusive interview during the show’s stop in Madison. Beadle was told by co-workers that Madison was the best Big Ten college town.[/media-credit]ESPN’s SportsNation, a show merging sports, pop culture and viewer interactivity, began a four-day tour of Big Ten campuses this week, kicking things off here in Madison. The show was broadcast live from the Terrace at Memorial Union yesterday afternoon. Herald Sports got to sit down with Jamie Horowitz, co-creator and coordinating producer of SportsNation, as well as co-host Michelle Beadle for a Q&A session before the show. Questions and responses have been edited for content and clarity.Badger Herald: How did the show start?Jamie Horowitz: I created the show with Kevin Wildes back in 2008. We pitched it to ESPN, they green-lit it and we moved to Connecticut. We always knew we wanted (co-host) Colin (Cowherd) to be the host, but we spent 10 months testing co-hosts before we found Michelle.BH: What was behind the Big Ten road trip?JH: We wanted to bring the show to the fans, since they’re such a big part of it. After we announced we were going to the Big Ten, we had all kinds of people getting angry, like “How are you not going to the SEC”?BH: Michelle, what had you heard about Madison?Michelle Beadle: I heard from a lot of guys back at work who had been here, that Madison was the best [Big Ten town]. I haven’t gotten to see as much of the city as I hoped, just kind of around this area (near the Union) and what’s that street? State Street? I’ve walked up that whole street. I really wanted to go on a run, but haven’t had time. They’ve kind of been driving us around everywhere, I’ve kind of gotten to see the area with the frats and sororities – they’re always real nice houses. I haven’t been to any of these cities before, here, Ann Arbor. I’m excited to go to Penn State, I think I have a cousin there or something. I’m determined to get a run in at Penn State.BH: How is co-hosting with Colin?MB: Colin is like my awkward older brother. He’s great. It’s been great though, it’s always better when you’re more comfortable with your co-anchor, co-host. When I’m gone, or have days off, or he has days off, the guest hosts are great, but it’s different. But Colin is great, because if you ask five different people, you’ll get five different opinions on him. I think the show lightened him up a bit, made him more likeable to people who had only heard him on the radio.BH: The show obviously relies a lot on viewer interaction. Is that the next evolution of television shows like this?JH: SportsNation, we’re just at the beginning of our journey – we’ve only been on the air 15 months. We grow as the fans grow; as more people come to the party, the more we learn about what we can do. Michelle and Colin have really evolved in the first year as well, in terms of their role on the show. Michelle, when we started the show, she wasn’t on Twitter. Now she has 100,000 followers. She’s on it every day, trying to find different angles and new ideas. It’s a real challenge, being part of the sports landscape – every day, all across the country, we’re having lots of the same conversations; should Michael Vick start or not start? It’s a real challenge to find a way to cut through and try to do something different, have a unique take.MB: Definitely, the interactivity is a big part, the next step. I was against Twitter before joining the show, but [I love it now]. We were at the bar the other night, I was getting updates from writers before I saw it [on T.V.]. It can kind of go too far sometimes, maybe – you have athletes tweeting about injuries as soon as they’re in the locker room.BH: What do you think about the Ines Sainz situation with the Jets? Is that an example of some of the challenges that exist as a woman in sports media?MB: I had no opinion on it. She wasn’t mad about it, so I didn’t care. It’s weird that I don’t have an opinion on it because I have an opinion on everything (laughs). Does she dress in a way that’s considered professional? No. But the Jets, they’re professionals, they shouldn’t have been acting like fourth-graders. I’ve been in – not NFL locker rooms – but NBA locker rooms and it’s the same. I could walk in wearing this [tablecloth] and a pair of shoes and I’d get comments. Boys will be boys.BH: What are you looking forward to with the show being in front of a live college audience on campus?MB: It’s the fun, the spontaneity. I hope Colin gets booed. And there’s always the one guy who yells something when it’s silent – I hope that happens. I hope it’s great, it should be. I hope they boo Colin – if you come, try and boo him.last_img read more

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