Update – Jeep stolen in Castlefin is recovered

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp By News Highland – July 2, 2019 Pinterest Google+ Twitter Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th DL Debate – 24/05/21 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Homepage BannerNewscenter_img Twitter Previous articleConcern as Podiatrist post still not filled at LUHNext articleCalls for action over youths congregating at Buncrana Pier News Highland Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebook Update – Jeep stolen in Castlefin is recovered WhatsApp A jeep stolen from the Castlefin area has been recovered, gardai have confirmed.The Dublin registered burgundy over silver Suzuki Grand Vitara was stolen yesterday afternoon at around 2pm. Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Google+ Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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Warburtons’ advertising account up for grabs

first_imgWarburtons is on the search for an agency to take charge of its £8m advertising account.The Bolton-based bakery has invested in agency Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R since 2009, which created such campaigns as the recent ‘Warburtons Taste Tester’ integrated campaign, focusing on its bread products as a breakfast option.According to Campaign magazine’s website, Warburtons has already approached a number of unknown agencies, ahead of meetings due to take place next week.Warburtons hired media agency Bartle Bogle Hegarty for 12 years before switching to RKCR/Y&R, which created the bread brand’s strapline, ‘Warburtons. We care because our name’s on it’. The agency additionally featured company chairman Jonathan Warburton in one of the bakery’s television campaigns.Richard Hayes, Warburtons’ marketing director, left the company in February after serving five years at the business.last_img read more

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Treasurer Announces New Economically Targeted Investment Program

first_imgFor immediate release:  April 9, 2007Treasurer Announces New Economically Targeted Investment ProgramMontpelier – Vermont State Treasurer Jeb Spaulding announced today that his office will soon be soliciting investment proposals for a new pension fund program intended to support economic and community development in Vermont.  This initiative stems from a policy on economically targeted investments adopted by the Vermont Pension Investment Committee, which oversees more than $3 billion in retirement funds for Vermont teachers, state employees, and municipal employees.“Our pension fund trustees work hard to protect the workers and retirees who depend on our retirement funds and this initiative will not reduce our obligation in that regard.  However, to the extent that we can support economic and community development in Vermont without sacrificing performance, it makes sense to do so,” Spaulding explained.Economically targeted investments are intended to generate market rate returns while providing collateral benefits that enhance quality of life and promote economic activity in a targeted area, in this case Vermont.  Economic or social benefits do not justify lower returns or inappropriate levels of risk.Spaulding stated that the kinds of investment opportunities that may be appropriate for the pension funds include affordable housing, energy efficiency, venture capital, or timber.  “Actually, we don’t want to limit the field of investment possibilities. We are hoping that creative minds will look over our policy and come up with some innovative proposals that meet our criteria for investment,” Spaulding explained.The program was developed to clearly articulate the criteria by which proposals will be judged and to solicit investment proposals from qualified managers once a year.  The first request for proposals window will be May 1 – June 15, 2007.  In order to be considered, proposals must, at a minimum:Target risk-adjusted, market-rate returns equivalent to or higher than other available investments in a similar asset class, andProvide a substantial, direct, and measurable benefit to economic or community development within the State of Vermont.  Any investments will be placed with an experienced and capable manager in an applicable asset class; no direct investments will be considered.Parties interested in receiving more information on the program should go to the State Treasurer’s Web site at www.vermonttreasurer.gov(link is external) or call 802-828-1452.# # # # #Barbara F. AgnewAssistant to the Treasurer109 State Street, 4th FloorMontpelier, VT  05609-6200Tel:  802-828-1452Fax: 802-828-2772last_img read more

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State regulators tell Georgia Power to add 2,210MW of new solar by 2024

first_imgState regulators tell Georgia Power to add 2,210MW of new solar by 2024 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Atlanta Journal Constitution:Georgia will rely more on the sun to generate electricity as it retreats from its once overwhelming reliance on coal.The state Public Service Commission’s five members — all Republicans — unanimously directed Georgia Power to make its biggest increase ever in renewables, nearly doubling the solar capacity of the state’s largest utility. The addition — 2,210 megawatts of new capacity from solar panels by 2024 — is enough to power more than 200,000 homes of the company’s 2.6 million customers.“It’s one of the cleanest and cheapest generation (sources) we can have,” PSC chairman Lauren “Bubba” McDonald said.He successfully pushed to more than double the amount of solar Georgia Power initially proposed as part of an update to its long-range energy plan. Most of the new solar generation is expected to come from large-scale commercial arrays rather than homeowners’ rooftops.But coal plants, once the dominant power source in Georgia and favored by President Donald Trump, are a shrinking part of the state’s energy mix as they become less economically viable. The PSC agreed with Georgia Power’s recommendation to close five coal-burning units, one at Plant McIntosh near Savannah and four more at Plant Hammond near Rome. The company started winding down operations this year.Georgia Power particularly heralded the PSC’s approval of 80 megawatts of battery energy storage, which could help store solar power. The project “is critical to growing and maximizing the value of renewable energy for customers as we increase our renewable generation,” Allen Reaves, the Atlanta-based company’s senior vice president, said in a press release.More: Georgia commissioners, all Republicans, increase solar power, cut coallast_img read more

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War College Aims to Build the Colombia of the Future

first_imgA few years ago we had almost 250,000 hectares and the year before last we reduced the area almost 49,000 hectares. However, due to some internal issues, the spraying of glyphosate was banned as of October 1st. Using the spray was a good strategy. It was not the only strategy, but it had the greatest impact. This has caused crops to be reintroduced. So now there is concern over the issue of drug trafficking, and we have a lot of experience on how to fight it with the Police and the [U.S.] Embassy. So this is an issue that draws the attention of other schools. Our Military academic programs include the Military Studies Course to train future generals and admirals, the Staff Course to train future lieutenant colonels and commanders, the CAMIN course for Military attachés, who will serve as defense attachés and Military attachés abroad… DIÁLOGO: What is the role and focus of the Colombian Army War College? The War College is building the Colombia of the future, and we are bringing together the country’s political forces. The strategic concept of what we are doing is basically divided into three areas: first, cooperation and development for stabilization; second, to ensure territorial control in order to protect institutions; and third, institutional strengthening of the Armed Forces, transparency, preserving comprehensive judicial integrity and many other things… So when we say we want to participate in cooperation and development, we have a whole portfolio of issues in service of the community. That is what we want to offer and that is also what has attracted foreign attention. But we know that the post-conflict era will involve conflict and we have several international advisers from the United States and other countries helping us work through this, and none of them is foreseeing a simple scenario… because the aftermath of war is harder than war itself. We are preparing for the worst so that we are ready, and we are doing all of this work at the War College. It’s interesting to read our country’s leaders, this General Salazar, he knows the facts and what the country’s needs are and where it is heading, this interview should be published by national media so the people can read and learn about the leader Excellent article, General Salazar is a great soldier I am in complete agreement with your assessment regarding the post conflict era which will be as bad as the conflict they have had over the past 50 years, I congratulate you, General, for the contribution you are making to the Government.. Each country should apply its own rules and laws respecting human rights as long as they are beneficial and healthy for their people keeping society at peace Meanwhile, the War College has several agreements/exchange programs with the European Union and the European Security and Defense College. We have one with the NATO Defense College… For two years we have been NATO security allies and in that process, we have strengthened ties in the field of educational doctrine, which is my area, with that institution. Last year we participated in activities in Austria. This year, in May, we will go to the [War] College in Warsaw to give a presentation. We are also close with the Defense College of South Korea and almost all other similar colleges, with our counterparts. We also have strong ties with the Air Force, Army, and Navy War Colleges in the United States. In Washington, we have agreements with the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies… in short, almost all of our counterpart schools. Right now we have 28 foreign students. It may not seem like a very significant number, but it is significant with regard to the countries with whom we have agreements. For example, we currently have students from the United States, Korea, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Honduras, and Mexico, and we have had students from Guatemala. These countries are important in the international arena and are friends of ours in our global efforts, such as Korea and other countries that are here regularly. We also offer other extensive courses for the Military based on their needs, and our continuing education courses open to the civil society feature four master’s degrees: a Master of Security and Defense, a Master of Strategy and Geopolitics, a Master of Cyber Security and Cyber Defense, and a Master of Human Rights and International Law in Armed Conflicts. These four programs are very distinctive and quite unique both within the country, as well as throughout South America. All of these factors make it a very special school because of its capabilities, its organization, its academic level, and the mission that it fulfills for the Armed Forces. Here, we offer academic programs for the Military and academic programs that are open to [the civil] society. Right now the BACRIM –criminal gangs, also known as maras in Central America – are on the rise. But at the international level, according to the Palermo Convention on the one hand, these are called Organized Criminal Groups. Under the Geneva Convention, on the other hand, they are defined as Organized Armed Groups (OAG). The BACRIM vacillate between these two definitions. If they do not have significant organizational skills, unified control or control over a territory, they are considered Organized Criminal Groups and fought under Human Rights law. But if the BACRIM have a centralized command and control over territories, they are considered OAG and fought under IHL. We must be very careful with that distinction in our doctrine and our operations, because otherwise it can cause problems. These are examples of the kinds of complexities we face in our support of the Police. However, it is necessary, it was an order of the President and it is something that is also happening around the world. Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: Students who come to the War College have been selected by the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Each force conducts a selection process to identify individuals for enrollment, and what we do here, through very special lines of education, is strengthen their skills and expertise. The most important area of expertise is leadership. Other areas of expertise that we strengthen here are administration, management, strategic planning, conducting operations, and interinstitutional advisory services, so that when they leave, they can participate in recommendations at the local and regional level with civilian leaders. Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: Here, we rely a lot on scholars, academics, specialists in doctrine, and international experts studying these conflicts, according to whom this role should ideally be limited. First, we must demilitarize the Police, which is militarized in Colombia. Someday, when we get back to normalcy as a country, our Police should be demilitarized and the Armed Forces should focus on their specific responsibilities, which are to protect the borders and national defense. It will take time to reach that desired state here in Colombia. We have created a scale, a spectrum, with the aim of achieving a return to normalcy by 2030. We have 14 years to continue ascending towards normalcy and to achieve this we must achieve stability. Currently, there are still sources of instability –social, political, economic and security factors. So our future plans in the post-conflict era, which is expected to begin in a few months, are focused on efforts oriented towards the stabilization of unstable areas. Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: Right now, the Armed Forces are making progress on a system of joint operations (between all forces), coordinated operations (with the Police) and interagency operations (with other state agencies), as well as joint operations with neighboring countries. So our relationships are conducted through agreements with state agencies and jointly coordinated plans. We provide Military assistance in some areas to the Police. For example, the main function of the Police is to combat drug trafficking, illegal mining, extortion, kidnapping, smuggling, arms trafficking, land dispossession… And we in the Armed Forces have been helping the Police with these issues for two years, by order of the President. Here in the Americas and in various forums that we have participated in, we are making progress on the issue of how the Armed Forces and the Army are assuming functions in support of the Police. It is an area of concern, but if it is not done, these problems will increase. And if we do not support the Police, these problems will overflow. So we do it out of necessity, but under defined roles and with the legal protections key to the conduct of Military actions, because the work of the Police is covered under Human Rights law, while the Armed Forces operate under the IHL [International Humanitarian Law] for armed conflict . These are two different types of the laws of war. So if we are going to support the Police under Human Rights law, it makes it difficult for us to use weapons. DIÁLOGO: What is the importance of the ESDEGUE subsidiaries, such as the Regional Center for Strategic Security Studies (CREES)? Why was there a need to create it as a separate entity from the educational program offered at the ESDEGUE? Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: The War College has several facets. First, it is the Armed Forces’ highest center of education. Second, it is a school for advanced training; it is a think tank, a research center, and an advisor to the Ministry of Defense, the General Command and, on some occasions, the federal government. It is a school that is open to all branches of service. There are students here from the Army, Navy, and Air Force, all in the same room, sharing the same curriculum and the same goals. In addition, it is an international school. We have teachers and international students from many countries throughout the Americas and some from Europe and Asia. By Dialogo April 07, 2016 DIÁLOGO: But do you believe that supporting the Police is the new standard, the new role of the Armed Forces, or do you believe that it is a temporary role? they include allowing two or three countries that have a common problem to unite, regardless of their politics or other interests, to deal with it. Therefore, the CREES also constitutes a good way to combine these efforts against these threats. The CREES is also a think tank. We have researchers here. We are establishing agreements for research networks with other institutes. However, the CREES belongs to the War College; the War College has some agreements in place with other institutions and national universities and internationally, thus becoming part of this research network as a think tank. In addition, the CREES is also becoming an advisory and consulting body to the Ministry of Defense, which originally had the idea of creating the Center and finally achieved it with the support of the United States. DIÁLOGO: What programs are offered together with other partner nations in the region, such as the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) and its components? DIÁLOGO: What is its significance today, 107 years after its foundation? What are your plans for the future of the War College? Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: We are nearing the end of an armed conflict, after more than 50 years of war with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). The FARC are in Military negotiations with the government because we achieved victory and [the FARC] became convinced that they could not reach their aims by force of arms. Diálogo recently visited the Colombian Army War College (ESDEGUE) in Bogotá, where it had the opportunity to talk with its director, Major General Juan Carlos Salazar Salazar. Among many topics, he discussed ESDEGUE’s significance as a standard bearer for the region, its unique curriculum, its Center for Strategic Security Studies, and the process of change for which the country is preparing its Armed Forces based on an ambitious project launched from the school itself. Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: Nowadays this importance is measured on a bilateral basis. Agreements are expected to be beneficial for both parties, so that through these agreements and close working relationships we can work together on the current issue of joint threats to the region. From the War College, we contribute good strategies, good initiatives, and a good understanding of threats to national security and defense as the main issue. From the War College, this rigor, this research, and this methodology will always be solid elements to contribute to the security and defense of all states. All states look to the War College to understand and jointly consider strategies to combat threats. DIÁLOGO: How does ESDEGUE cooperate with the general and sectoral commands in developing doctrine to train and use ground forces? We have identified 17 areas of instability, five at sea and 12 on land, where if we apply all of the stability interventions, we will make significant progress towards normalization. These sources of instability include criminal gangs, drug trafficking, the lack of infrastructure, the lack of secondary and tertiary roads… If no attention is paid to the basic needs of health, water, and education –these are also factors of instability. There are many factors of instability, not just economic and security-related, that must be solved. To do so, at the War College we have made maps based on nearly 40 factors with the very large undertaking of developing the post-conflict plan. This plan has been under implementation for three months with the help of nearly 400 people from all of the forces involved in the strategic, operational, and tactical areas. We believe that within three months we will complete that plan to fight the factors of instability and get back to normalcy by 2030. It is an ambitious plan that is being achieved with the tools that each force has and it is contributing to a unified action by the state. And the War College, as an academic center, has initiated this great crusade and we are convinced that we are making significant progress in the Military area of operations. We are now taking the model that we have for the Armed Forces of the post-conflict era to other government authorities and the political parties of the country, the council of ministers, as well as other partners, such as the Ambassador of the United States [Kevin Whitaker] and [Lieutenant] General [Joseph] Di Salvo [the Military Deputy Commander of SOUTHCOM], to whom this will be explained on March 15th. It is a model of cooperative Armed Forces. We want to be seen as partners, as Armed Forces sharing in cooperative leadership that is integrated and not solely Military, but that is in sync with our leaders. Our style had been different up to this point in the war, but now there has been a shift to another stage and our contribution to the post-conflict era will be very different and integrated. DIÁLOGO: What is the importance of working together with partner countries such as the United States and others? DIÁLOGO: How does ESDEGUE compare with other similar institutions in the region? Yesterday, for example, we received the War College of the U.S. Air Force, which came not just to visit, but to learn about some of the issues of interest to them. Foremost among these issues was fighting terrorism. Colombia was a different country 10 or 12 years ago, a country under siege that was seen from the outside as possibly an unviable country. After so many years of conflict, we were able to turn the tide, and the balance of power has changed. They wanted to know how it was accomplished. On the issue of drug trafficking, we have gotten together with advisers from countries such as Mexico, under a United States-Mexico-Colombia triangulation, to advise Mexico. We have young people from our Police, Army, and Navy serving as advisers on drug trafficking issues. This issue has lately taken a turn for the worse. We are once again the top cocaine producing country, which is a major concern after having done so well. For example, under Human Rights law, you cannot conduct a bombing campaign, since this falls under IHL. Therefore, you need to update all the legal legislation and that is not easy. It is a process that goes all the way to Congress, and we are in the process of adapting our legislation to enable us to combat these criminal phenomena. Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: CREES’s main partner is the Special Operations Command South, aligned with the Joint Special Operations University (JSOU), and in its short period of time in existence, other partners have emerged, with whom we are now building partnerships. One example is the Security and Defense Network of Latin America (RESDAL) in the south of the country; in Chile we have some important strategic studies centers; and right now we are building some agreements in Mexico and Brazil that we hope to consolidate by the end of the year. But right now, our biggest partner is the United States. The CREES is a vehicle to show the world all the lessons learned and our experiences. These successes that we have had and that are very distinctive worldwide, such as our intelligence operations capabilities, which have been conducted in a clean, transparent manner, with a lot of initiative and dedication. One example is Operation Jaque, which allowed for the rescue [of 15 hostages kidnapped by the FARC in July 2008]. We have conducted many such operations. And there is significant interest from the international community, because we export such lessons. We have accumulated significant capabilities in the operation of nocturnal aerial equipment. After the United States, we are the country that most engages in assault operations, rescues, and casualty evacuation at night. Major General Juan Carlos Salazar Salazar, director of the ESDEGUE: The War College’s mission is to build comprehensive leaders that are prepared to face national security and defense challenges, both at the strategic and operational levels. Here at the War College, we train future generals, admirals and lieutenant colonels. Here in Colombia, there is a confluence of threats that are common to many countries in the region and the world. They have now become transnational threats. Crime is transnational, drug trafficking is transnational, and operating under a system of cooperative security, we can all help each other. So, the CREES also aims to integrate all of these regional efforts to understand the behavior of these threats and build strategies to address them. If we consider the measures to promote mutual trust at the moment, a mechanism that exists within the OAS [Organization of American States] and worldwide –a mechanism for promoting mutual trust – Maj. Gen. Salazar Salazar: There are several factors that make ESDEGUE unique in the region. In terms of our history, we were founded almost 107 years ago, so we have a certain status compared to other schools that are relatively new. In terms of the quality of the teaching programs, we compete with almost every other institution that has master’s degree programs. So we are very observant of how they operate, as a benchmark to make adjustments. Our international teachers also bring us great ideas from their schools. From the academic standpoint, we are updated through them and through the Military attachés who visit us and our attachés who go to other countries. In addition, our 50 years of experience with war is an issue that attracts a lot of attention and draws many people. There is a lot to teach about that, issues such as Integrated Action, which is very much a characteristic of ours, and how to contribute to the stability and consolidation of regions through Military leadership in critical regions. All of these Integrated Action issues receive a lot of attention. There are also new issues, such as illegal mining, which is being used as a source of funding to support terrorist groups. That has also drawn the attention of foreign schools because we also have significant experience in this area. Our experience in combating extortion and kidnapping has also been useful for our neighboring countries to the south and Mexico, who suffer from the same problems. Here, we have had a very successful strategy involving the Police, Navy, and Army with the GAULA groups [Unified Action Groups for Personal Liberty], which are the main tool to fight extortion and kidnapping, working closely with prosecutors and intelligence agencies. So, that type of organization, our experiences, also attracts the attention of friendly countries. DIÁLOGO: What is the profile of the students who attend ESDEGUE? What percentage of students are Colombian Military officers, members of the Armed Forces of friendly nations, and civilians? last_img read more

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Authorities warn against ‘porch pirates’ this holiday season

first_imgAs the craze of Black Friday and Cyber Monday pass, many people are receiving deliveries to their homes in the coming weeks and authorities are warning of the possibility for stolen packages. Not only did she lose the gift, but said, “it hits your heart really hard, especially the fact that my parents were saving it up all year and they don’t have a lot of money.” Local Mother Micalya Robertson said she’s fallen victim to this kind of thief, “my mother had been nice enough to save up for the whole year, money, $200, it was on a Walmart gift card and unfortunately while I was at work one day, somebody stole it out of my mailbox.” “One of the best ways that people can protect themselves is just through tracking their packages, knowing when things are going to be delivered,” Barcek added. (WBNG) — Authorities are warning against ‘porch pirates’ as you order gifts this holiday season. Detective Barcek said delivering packages to work is a good way to avoid package thieves. Broome County Sheriff’s Office Detective Matt Barcek said, “you’re always going to see an increase in the amount of larcenies around this time because people are getting more stuff delivered to them.” “You can also have them diverted to a facility for those companies where you could then pick them up which is the safest way,” he added.center_img He says the so-called ‘porch pirates’ are not shy this time of year. Now, Robertson doesn’t send packages to her home, but rather her work. Since that change, she’s been holiday theft-free. Officials recommend keeping you property well-lit and said cameras can be helpful. “We’ve seen these criminals being so brazen, they’ll come out in broad daylight and just take things.” If you think a package of yours was stolen, authorities say first check with your carrier to make sure it was brought to the right address. If your package was stolen, get in touch with police as soon as possible.last_img read more

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Local officials react to three-digit number proposal for mental health emergencies

first_imgKeith Leahey, the executive director for the Mental Health Association of the Southern Tier, says this could be a positive step to stop suicide rates from increasing. The FCC says the new number would automatically direct callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) – A new proposal from the Federal Communications Commission is designating “988” to be the national hotline for mental health crisis and suicide prevention. “Anytime that we can make it easier for folks to seek help during difficult times. It’s going to just increase individuals ability to get help,” said Leahey. “Not everyone is aware of the 1-800-273-TALK number. It’s maybe a difficult number for people to remember when they are in distress. So you know a number such as 988 you know is going to make an enormous difference.” “There’s still a lot of shame that’s attached to mental health conditions. It’s a hidden disability many times… We are seeing signs as well that we are really coming to be more accepting and open about talking about mental health conditions,” said Leahey. “There’s a huge need that’s out there for people to just connect and feel supported.” Leahy believes the number is not only easier to remember, but he says having an emergency number for mental health can also help reduce stigmas. The 988 number isn’t fully functional just yet. The next step is a comment period for how the FCC will implement the new number and deciding the time frame for when it will be in operation.last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: No vaccine decision, cases near 6,500, low vaccine demand, flu research

first_imgMay 14, 2009WHO: No decision yet on H1N1 vaccine productionExperts convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) today made no decision on recommending mass production of a vaccine for the novel H1N1 virus, and how soon such a recommendation might come is uncertain, said Dr. Keiji Fukuda of the WHO. “No big decision, no pronouncements,” he told reporters. Calling the issue “enormously complicated,” he said a series of additional meetings will be needed. “It’s not possible to say a decision will be made by this [a specific] date,” he said.[May 14 WHO briefing audio file]Global novel influenza total tops 6,000The global number of novel H1N1 influenza cases reached 6,497 in 33 countries, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported today. The count includes 2,446 cases and 60 deaths in Mexico, 3,352 cases and 3 deaths in the United States as of yesterday, and 8 cases and 1 death in Costa Rica. Other countries with more than a dozen cases include Spain (100), the United Kingdom (71), Panama (29), and France (14).[WHO update 28]US novel flu cases pass 4,000Today the US tally of confirmed H1N1 cases grew to 4,298, of which 3 were fatal, in 47 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported. North Dakota and Arkansas, with one case each, were added to the list of affected states today.[Current CDC numbers]WHO shortens upcoming World Health AssemblyThe WHO today announced a shortened schedule for the upcoming World Health Assembly. The WHO had been considering the move to allow more time for health ministers to address H1N1 issues in their own countries. The WHA starting date is still May 18, but the meeting will end on May 22 instead of May 27. The agenda includes pandemic preparedness, influenza virus sharing, the International Health Regulations, and WHO budgets and administration.[May 14 WHO statement]Poll finds low demand for potential new flu vaccineA Zogby/University of Texas poll found that only 30% of respondents would get a vaccine for the novel H1N1 outbreak if one was available. Only 18% saw the outbreak as a severe threat, and 96% said they have not curbed their visits to restaurants or malls. Forty percent were confident in the government’s ability to manage the outbreak. Only 36% of respondents said they received a flu immunization for the 2008-09 season. The online poll surveyed 1,442 adults between May 4 and 6.[May 13 Zogby press release]NIH renews support for Baylor flu vaccine researchThe Baylor Institute for Immunology Research recently announced that the National Institutes of Health renewed its grant, worth $14 million over the next 5 years, to design new influenza vaccines. The work involves molecules that target the immune system’s dendritic cells. The institute applied for a grant supplement to make a vaccine against the novel H1N1 virus.[May 11 Baylor press release]last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Sick-leave policies, spring-wave protection?, vaccine updates, Web resources

first_imgOct 8, 2009Lack of paid sick leave could spread fluA lack of paid sick leave could force working parents either to report to work sick with flu or to send their children to school sick, at the risk of sacrificing either income or their jobs, ABC News reports. Up to 54 million Americans, many of them self-employed or employees of small businesses, have little or no paid sick leave, an issue that advocates hope to bring before Congress.http://abcnews.go.com/Health/SwineFluNews/unpaid-sick-days-leave-parents-tough-choices-flu/story?id=8775513Oct 7 ABC News reportSpring wave may have given NYC some protectionNew York City and a few other cities that had big H1N1 outbreaks in the spring are seeing little activity now, leading to suggestions that the spring wave spawned a significant level of population immunity, the New York Times reported today. City health officials believe that perhaps 20% to 40% of the population were exposed to the virus in the spring and gained immunity. But city officials and other experts agreed it would be unwise to assume that New Yorkers don’t need the H1N1 vaccine.http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/08/health/08flu.html?ref=healthOct 8 New York Times storyThird of parents may say no to kids’ vaccineConcerned over the new H1N1 vaccine, or unconcerned about the seriousness of the disease, 38% of parents say they are unlikely to permit their children to be vaccinated during school programs planned by many states, according to an Associated Press (AP)-GfK poll. Federal health officials vouched for the vaccine’s safety, urging widespread inoculation. Among concerns are the newness of the vaccine and potential side-effects.Oct 7 AP storyNew Web resources for individuals, familiesThe federal government’s www.flu.gov Web site has two new features, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced yesterday. A self-evaluation section for adults offers a click-through assessment aimed at determining whether flu is or is not present, followed by guidance on self-care, preventing transmission, and warning signs of serious disease. “Flu Myths and Facts” provides accurate refutations of common misconceptions about vaccinations and the disease itself.http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/10/20091007a.htmlOct 7 HHS news releaseCDC unveils system to gather data on flu-like illnessThe CDC today announced the launch of a system to gather data about influenza-like illness (ILI) from syndromic surveillance systems run by health departments in cooperation with hospital emergency departments. The system, called Distribute, enhances existing flu surveillance by providing more details on geographic- and age-specific trends, the agency said. The system involves a partnership of the CDC with the International Society for Disease Surveillance and the Public Health Informatics Institute.http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5839a5.htmCDC announcement in Oct 9 MMWRCanadian H1N1 vaccination to lag US by weeksCanada’s national campaign to vaccinate residents against the H1N1 flu is likely to begin in early November because attempts to move up the shots’ delivery have not been successful, according to the Canadian Press. The US campaign uses multiple suppliers and began with a roll-out of aerosol vaccine; Canada uses only one manufacturer, and aerosol vaccine is not approved for sale there.Oct 6 Canadian Press reportMichigan man recounts 7-week H1N1 battleA Michigan man who barely survived a battle with the H1N1 virus is expressing support for the vaccination campaign, according to ABC News. Jim Shrode, 53, was in excellent health before he fell ill with the virus in May. He was hospitalized for 7 weeks, required mechanical ventilation, and lost 37 pounds. “People need to know that the risks of the vaccine are minimal compared to the risks if you get ill with it,” he said.http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/surving-swine-flu/story?id=8777207Oct 8 ABC News reportlast_img read more

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It won’t be easy to remove inspectors

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionReferring to the Dec. 13 editorial encouraging the state to pass a law that would revoke the certification of any building inspector who is found to be guilty of misconduct, don’t think it will be a simple matter.  The certificates they are issued indicates that the candidate has attended mandatory training and that he or she has passed a test. That certification can help a local government decide if a candidate has achieved a basic level of competence. But it doesn’t end there.Don’t forget the civil service system. Who is going to fight to fire this unscrupulous worker who is entitled to due process? I guess that would have to be the local government. Lots of luck there.There are approximately 1,500 local governments in the state. Add in 60 counties and numerous state agencies that also have code enforcement responsibilities. The state is already required to train all if them. What kind of program could the financially strapped state possibly come up with to monitor, investigate and possibly litigate all of the allegations that could arise from such a program. How does one define misconduct?Was the Jay Street fire a result of misconduct or just plain stupidity? Was the inspector incompetent or was he unscrupulously guilty of misconduct. Was the inspector asked to do more than he was capable of? All of these questions will be put to a jury. How could the state rule that he was guilty of misconduct and take away his certification if the court can’t even do it.I don’t think the state would want to be in the middle of that argument.It sounds good on paper. But unless the state comes up with the money to develop and implement any kind of meaningful program, it will be doomed from the start.Don’t get your hopes up.  Roy ScottSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

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