Militias threaten journalists covering protests in Iraq

first_img Organisation Help by sharing this information Media outlets have not been spared either. Gunmen attacked and ransacked at least three Baghdad TV channels during the first week of the protests. The harassment is such that many journalists have opted to stop working. RSF has been told that many have left Baghdad or even Iraq altogether. Journalists covering a seven-week-old wave of protests in Iraq have repeatedly been threatened by local militias to get them stop their reporting. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the growing threats to Iraqi journalists and calls on the authorities to provide them with better protection. IraqMiddle East – North Africa Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists Armed conflicts Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” “In this climate of growing violence, which is targeting the media in particular, the Iraqi authorities are failing to fulfil their role and duty to protect journalists,” said Sabrina Bennoui, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “Everything must be done to prevent more serious violations of this kind. Journalists are already struggling to provide coverage and, if the state does nothing, they could be reduced to silence as in the worst dictatorships.” News February 15, 2021 Find out more Writer and citizen-journalist Amjed Al-Dahamat was gunned down by an unidentified armed group in the southeastern province of Maysan on 7 November after repeatedly being threatened for weeks. News December 16, 2020 Find out more December 28, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Iraq RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Muhammad Al-Shamari, a member of the Iraqi Observatory for Press Freedoms (which is linked to the national journalists’ union), was kidnapped near his home on 17 November and remained missing until released 24 hours later. He had often posted information on Facebook about the crackdown on the protests and had received threats from many quarters. No information about the circumstances of his abduction or release has emerged. Receive email alerts News News According to the Press Freedom Advocacy Association, 33 journalists have been threatened by members of unidentified militias since the protests began on 1 October. The figure is all the more alarming because the threats are increasingly being followed up by acts of violence. RSF_en to go further November 22, 2019 Militias threaten journalists covering protests in Iraq Aside from their armed wings, these various sources of influence have armies of anonymous online social network accounts, some of which have been sharing a blacklist of journalists said to work “for Israel and the United States.” Dozens of these accounts, now using an “Agents of the Joker” hashtag to allude to the United States, are currently circulating photos of journalists – identified as enemies and dressed like clowns against the backdrop of a US flag – like wanted notices.Iraq is ranked 156th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. IraqMiddle East – North Africa Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists Armed conflicts Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan For years, Iraq has had around 60 militias linked to religious groups, political parties or foreign governments that operate in parallel to the regular forces and often escape government control. Their existence makes it hard to identify who is responsible for threats. Taking advantage of the chaos accompanying the current protests, these groups are targeting reporters who film the unrest, especially live rounds being fired at protesters.last_img read more

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Chamber expands operations to Shannon Free Zone

first_imgShannon Chamber Webinar to help people cope with the stresses of COVID-19 Shannon Chamber members briefed on infrastructure developments and smart technologies introduced by ESB Networks Print TAGSEI ElectronicsFree ZoneHelen DownesMichael GuineeMinconPaddy PurcellRay O’DriscollShannon Airport HouseShannon ChamberShannon Commercial PropertiesSkycourt Ei Electronics give Tom Clifford Park a lift Twitter WhatsApp Companies should monitor energy water and waste according to seminar in Shannon Chamber Minister to address chamber on national plans Previous articleLimerick event bridges gap between education and employmentNext articleJoseph and his Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Editor center_img Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NewsBusinessChamber expands operations to Shannon Free ZoneBy Editor – November 18, 2017 2508 Shannon Chamber chief executive Helen Downes and President Julie Dickerson with Matthew Thomas, and Ray O’Driscoll of the Shannon Group and the Chamber team (back left): Cillian Griffey, Lijana Kizaite, Dympna O’Callaghan and Deirdre MurphyOver the past 21 years, Shannon Chamber has become an intrinsic part of the business community in the greater Shannon area and has expanded both its membership base and its staff complement.To cater for the needs of this growing membership, which now stands at over 300 companies with an extended reach to their 10,000 employees, and to give its staff of six greater space in which to work, the Chamber has opened a second office in the newly refurbished Shannon Airport House at Shannon Free Zone.Its former head office in SkyCourt will remain open and be used more extensively by Shannon Chamber Skillnet to provide a range of training programmes to member companies.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Chamber chief executive Helen Downes said that the Chamber has an expansive remit and an exceptionally heavy workload, which required them to look at expanding to larger premises to accommodate its increasing staff numbers.“Having a presence on the Free Zone also brings us closer to our membership, which is, in the main, from the wide sectoral representation located in the Zone and the wider Shannon area. Retaining our office in SkyCourt means that we can maintain the link with the retail community, the commercial heart of Shannon.“It’s a new era for the Chamber; a time to plan for bigger and greater in the next decade. Our founding board set the foundations for what we are and where we are today and it’s at a time like this that I get the opportunity, on behalf of the board, to thank our founders, most especially, Michael Guinee, chairman, CEO and founder of Ei Electronics and Paddy Purcell, chairman and founder of Mincon, for their entrepreneurial foresight; both continue to take a great interest in what we do and were very supportive of this expansion,” added Ms Downes.Shannon Chamber chief executive Helen Downes and president Julie Dickerson (front row) with Ray O’Driscoll and Matthew Thomas of the Shannon Group and membrrs of Shannon Chamber board .Welcoming the Chamber to Shannon Airport House, Ray O’Driscoll, managing director, Commercial Properties, Shannon Group plc said: “They arrive at an exciting time in Shannon Commercial Properties’ journey as we regenerate the Free Zone and rebrand our €25 million first phase redevelopment as Gateway West in the Shannon Free Zone. We look forward to working with them to promote all that is great about Shannon for FDI, SMEs and entrepreneurs. Their strategic positioning, as the first point of contact in our newly established Gateway Hub at Shannon Airport House and at the heart of the Free Zone, will serve as a beacon to new and expanding enterprise.”More business news here Email Linkedin Facebook Midsummer Fairways for Shannon Chamber Members last_img read more

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It won’t be easy to remove inspectors

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionReferring to the Dec. 13 editorial encouraging the state to pass a law that would revoke the certification of any building inspector who is found to be guilty of misconduct, don’t think it will be a simple matter.  The certificates they are issued indicates that the candidate has attended mandatory training and that he or she has passed a test. That certification can help a local government decide if a candidate has achieved a basic level of competence. But it doesn’t end there.Don’t forget the civil service system. Who is going to fight to fire this unscrupulous worker who is entitled to due process? I guess that would have to be the local government. Lots of luck there.There are approximately 1,500 local governments in the state. Add in 60 counties and numerous state agencies that also have code enforcement responsibilities. The state is already required to train all if them. What kind of program could the financially strapped state possibly come up with to monitor, investigate and possibly litigate all of the allegations that could arise from such a program. How does one define misconduct?Was the Jay Street fire a result of misconduct or just plain stupidity? Was the inspector incompetent or was he unscrupulously guilty of misconduct. Was the inspector asked to do more than he was capable of? All of these questions will be put to a jury. How could the state rule that he was guilty of misconduct and take away his certification if the court can’t even do it.I don’t think the state would want to be in the middle of that argument.It sounds good on paper. But unless the state comes up with the money to develop and implement any kind of meaningful program, it will be doomed from the start.Don’t get your hopes up.  Roy ScottSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

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Watford, Hull and Leeds suffer FACup upsets …holders Manchester United through

first_imgBy Steve TongueLONDON(Reuters)-Premier League clubs Watford and Hull City, and Championship side Leeds United paid the penalty for fielding weakened teams when they were all knocked out of the FA Cup in the fourth round yesterday — but holders Manchester United won comfortably.Like Liverpool, beaten at home by Wolverhampton Wanderers on Saturday, the three beaten sides miscalculated in resting so many players ahead of league games in midweek and could have no complaints at going out of the competition.Yet United went through, winning 4-0 despite making nine changes at home to Wigan Athletic, who are in the bottom three of the Championship.Watford lost 1-0 to League One (third tier) side Millwall and Hull, FA Cup finalists three years ago, were humbled 4-1 by Championship (second tier) side Fulham after missing two late penalties.Leeds, fourth in the Championship and giving greater priority to returning to the Premier League after a 13-year absence, lost 1-0 to Sutton United, who joined fellow fifth-tier National League club Lincoln City in the last 16.It is the first time two non-League clubs have progressed that far since the competition was reorganised more than 90 years ago.At Old Trafford, Marouane Felliani broke Wigan’s dogged resistance in the 43rd minute by heading in a cross from former German international Bastian Schweinsteiger, making a rare appearance.Anthony Martial, criticised by manager Jose Mourinho last week, then set up goals for Chris Smalling and Henrikh Mkhitaryan before Schweinsteiger added United’s fourth.“The first half was not very, very good but we managed to be 1-0 in front,” Mourinho said. “The second half was much better and the job was done.”Millwall, who beat another understrength Premier League team, Bournemouth, in the previous round, fully deserved the win earned for them with a goal by Steve Morison in the 85th minute.Watford’s manager Walter Mazzarri had made seven changes, leaving experienced players like captain Troy Deeney and midfielders Etienne Capoue and Tom Cleverley among the substitutes.They also lost goalkeeper Costel Pantilimon to injury just before halftime.Manager Neil Harris felt his mid-table League One team fully deserved their victory over a side 40 places above them.“We could easily have been three or four up by halftime,” he said.“This club and this team epitomise what the FA Cup is all about.”At Craven Cottage on the bank of the River Thames, Hull, who had made six changes, fell behind to a goal by their former forward Sone Aluko after 16 minutes.Evandro headed an equaliser four minutes into the second half, but Chris Martin, on loan from Derby County, soon restored the lead.Promising youngster Ryan Sessegnon added a third goal and with 12 minutes left Stefan Johansen scored a fourth.Hull’s Abel Hernandez then had two penalties saved by goalkeeper Marcus Bettinelli in the space of a minute to round off a bad day.“We have to do many, many things before the transfer window closes on Tuesday,” their manager Marco Silva said.Former European Cup finalists Leeds, out of the top flight of English football since 2004, fielded almost a complete reserve team on the artificial pitch at Sutton and found the non-Leaguers, 84 places below them, too strong.Captain Jamie Collins scored the only goal from a penalty after 53 minutes and Leeds finished with only 10 men when their own captain, Liam Cooper, was sent off near the end.Leeds manager Garry Monk admitted he had made too many changes to the regular team.His opposite number, Paul Doswell, said the result and financial benefits from live television coverage were a “life-changer” for the 118-year-old club.last_img read more

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