Civil Legal Justice Act keeps rolling through the legislature

first_imgCivil Legal Justice Act keeps rolling through the legislature Civil Legal Justice Act keeps rolling through the legislature Clearing another hurdle, the Florida Civil Legal Justice Act — a top priority of The Florida Bar — was unanimously approved by both the House Council for Smarter Government and Health & Human Services Appropriations in late February.Sen. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, one of 60 legislative sponsors of CS/HB 491, said the act would help provide civil legal assistance to those who can least afford legal services. The money could be used to help victims of domestic violence, children in civil cases, immigrants, and people who need help obtaining federal benefits. The money could not be used to sue the state or any of its subsidiaries.“I can say to you as a former president of a local bar and a former member of the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar, that delivery of legal services is extremely important in this state,” he told the appropriations committee.Goodlette said it was originally hoped the act could be funded with $10 million in surplus federal dollars earmarked for transitional welfare programs as part of the welfare reform movement, but those funds wound up set aside for other uses as the state faces the budget crisis. Goodlette, however, said $500,000 is available for the act and will likely be earmarked for pilot programs.The council also adopted amendments riding with the bill that would void the act if the money is used for purposes which are found to violate the Florida or federal constitutions, and clarifies that legal assistance and advice for those noncriminal infractions in Chapters 316, 318, 320 and 322 would not be covered by the act. Goodlette noted that includes a prohibition against the money being used to fight DUI charges.Florida is one of only 11 states that provides no state funding for legal aid — something Bar President Terry Russell has made a top priority to change.While a large percentage of Florida lawyers provide pro bono services to the poor every year, those lawyers can’t help everyone, Russell said.Appropriations committee member Rep. Phillip Brutus, D-North Miami, said that, as a small-firm practitioner in South Florida, he runs “a poverty law center without the grants,” because often his clients can’t pay for services rendered. He added that the provision would help lessen that burden shouldered by private practitioners.center_img March 15, 2002 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Putin to host Russia WWII parade ahead of key vote

first_imgThe 67-year-old will survey a display of modern military might involving over 13,000 troops, with more than 20 items of hardware on show for the first time including Tosochka flame-throwers, T-90M tanks and Buk-M3 surface-to-air missile systems.Vintage vehicles such as the workhorse T-34 tank will also be on display and some troops will wear World War II uniforms.Putin, whose two-year-old brother died as Nazis encircled Leningrad, has sought to associate his regime with the most revered aspect of the Soviet era: wartime victory.Ahead of the parade, he slammed the West for “insulting Russia” by playing down the USSR’s role in winning the war.While Putin has pushed for the parade, some have voiced fears over the risk of infection, with mass public events still formally banned in Moscow.The event will see troops from 13 countries including China and India marching and more than 200 military vehicles rolling down central streets. ‘Historic truth’ More than a dozen Russian cities and regions have opted not to hold parades on the same day, citing virus risks, although events will go ahead in cities including Saint Petersburg and Volgograd.Showing jitters, both Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin and Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov have advised people to watch it on television rather than attend in person.”Why in hell are you holding it if you don’t recommend going?” top opposition politician Alexei Navalny asked in a live blog.At rehearsals, troops were wearing masks and rubber gloves but they will not do so on the day, an army source told AFP.Preference was given to troops with virus antibodies, the defense ministry said.Seated at intervals in the stands will be veterans who have been quarantined ahead of the event in sanatoriums, Putin’s spokesman Peskov said.French President Emmanuel Macron and Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping are among international leaders who were initially set to attend but have since cancelled.However, Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko and Chinese defense minister Wei Fenghe are expected to be there.Putin has angered some by fast-tracking the parade and the constitution vote while he remains carefully shielded from the virus.The opposition slammed him for timing the vote to benefit from a mood of patriotism straight after the parade.Navalny questioned why “this fraudulent, fake vote has to be dressed up with victory celebrations and victory symbols like tinsel”.One Moscow billboard urging Russians to vote shows a little girl in World War II uniform with the slogan: “We’ll protect the memory of our ancestors.”The constitutional amendments proposed by Putin include one honoring war victims and defending “historic truth”. Thousands of Russian troops will march in Moscow on Wednesday as President Vladimir Putin brushes off virus fears to host a World War II commemoration ahead of a crucial vote on his rule.The military display in Red Square to mark 75 years since the Soviet victory in World War II had been scheduled for May 9 but the Kremlin postponed it citing requests from veterans, as coronavirus cases shot up.Putin rescheduled the event as soon as lockdown measures eased, keen to move on from an outbreak that has hit his country hard. With more than 8,000 recorded fatalities and around 580,000 confirmed COVID-19 infections, Russia has the pandemic’s third largest caseload after the United States and Brazil.The parade coincides with the anniversary of the first post-war parade on Red Square, which saw Soviet troops throw down Nazi standards in front of the Lenin mausoleum on June 24, 1945.It comes just a week ahead of a national vote on constitutional amendments that would allow Putin, in power since 2000, to reset his term-limit clock to zero and stay in the Kremlin until 2036.The parade will be Putin’s first major appearance in public since the pandemic, after he attended an open-air flag-raising ceremony on June 12. Topics :last_img read more

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Twitter to Move into Custom-Built Data Center

first_imgFacebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Tags:#twitter#web curt hopkins Related Posts Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification “We frequently compare the tasks of scaling, maintaining, and tweaking Twitter to building a rocket in mid-flight.”The new data center , he said, will give Twitter a number of advantages. More capacity to deal with growthFull control over network and systems configurationFlexibility to make infrastructure changesHigh redundancySLC photo by Dave Winer Twitterannounced today that it will be moving into its own dedicated data center in Salt Lake City this fall. From the beginning, Twitter has struggled against issues of scalability and reliability. Users of the fast-growing microblogging service have been constantly plagued by slow-downs and downtime, the latest only two days ago. A data center is a big step to putting that aspect of their history behind them. Twitter is still adding as many as 300,000 users a day and the The World Cup, the most popular web event of all time, and one which tasked Twitter severely, just wrapped up. Twitter engineer Jean-Paul Cozzatti surveyed the problems the company has had with reliability. The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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Driving Our SUVs to the BP Protests

first_imgI’m sorry, but the irony is just too thick these days. We Americans are rightly upset with BP for the devastating spill in the Gulf that is wreaking ecological devastation on a mammoth scale. But as I watch the television news and read the daily coverage, I’m not hearing enough outrage at our petroleum-dependent lifestyles and the gas-guzzling vehicles we hop into at a moment’s notice to drive to the store for a pint of ice cream. We need to hold a mirror up to ourselves at those protest rallies.Oil spills are tragic on multiple levels: to the affected ecosystems; to those who depend on the region’s bounty for their livelihoods; to the tourism industry in the region; and even to employees at the oil companies and public agencies whom we have to assume are trying hard to do the right thing. Residents of the Gulf Coast and ecosystems are being — or will soon be — devastated by the spill that continues to hemorrhage tens of thousands of barrels of oil into the Gulf daily. We must redouble efforts to protect coastal wetlands while workers with their undersea robotic vehicles continue trying to stem the leak. And we certainly should hold the companies that caused the leak liable for the costs of cleanup, as well as for the economic damage both the oil and its cleanup are causing. Those impacts will likely be measurable for years, if not decades.But at the same time, we too — consumers of the oil and gas we are going to ever-greater effort to harvest — must share some of that blame. Every once in a while we are reminded in a very dramatic way of the larger impacts of our profligate consumption of oil. The Santa Barbara oil spill in January 1969 spilled 200,000 gallons of crude oil, despoiling a 35-mile stretch of the California coastline and resulting in a ban on offshore drilling. Twenty years later in March, 1989, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 10.8 million gallons of crude oil, ravaging the rich biodiversity along a 1,300-mile span of Prince William Sound coastline and leading to tighter regulations on shipping oil, including the requirement for double hulls in the oil tankers that haul billions of gallons of oil around the world each year.Now, after two more decades, another oil spill is dominating the news. As with the other two described, this one is far larger than the previous one. By government estimates, the BP spill has already spewed 22-35 million gallons (at least twice as much oil as the Exxon Valdez), and some experts say the rate of flow from the disabled blowout valve is significantly greater. While progress appears to have been made in capturing some of the gushing oil, we are told that it will be months before the well is permanently capped and the spill fully contained.These spills are horrible, of course, but so too are the spills that occur when the oil pans in our cars drip oil. Each year in the U.S. roughly 180 million gallons of motor oil is either dumped down the drain during oil changes or is leaked from engine crankcases, according to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. The few drops of gasoline that most of us spill each time we fuel up our cars add up to hundreds of thousands of gallons per year nationally. Leaks from our outboard motors leave that familiar iridescent sheen on the water. The lubricating oil we use in our chainsaws is deposited directly onto the ground as we cut our cordwood (as it’s intended to do). These smaller incremental leaks each year add up to many times as much oil contamination as the BP spill to date.This is not at all meant to trivialize the BP spill, but rather to point out the significance of oil spills that we consumers can do something about. We can repair our cars so that they don’t drip motor oil. We can be more careful when fueling up. We can use biobased lubricating oil for chainsaws. And, of course, we can use less energy—by driving less and better insulating our houses.If we’re serious about our anger at the BP oil spill in the Gulf, we should direct a large share of that anger at our own consumption of petroleum in our cars and our homes. As Pogo said in Walt Kelly’s famous comic strip: “We have met the enemy and he is us.”Interested in your thoughts.Alex Wilson is the executive editor of Environmental Building News and founder of BuildingGreen, LLC. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feeds.last_img read more

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