Harvard readies for 369th Commencement

first_imgFounded in 1636, Harvard did not hold its first Commencement until Sept. 23, 1642 — with just nine students graduating that year. War and plague halted a handful of Commencement Exercises, but fortunately, the tradition has held fast with a growing number of degree recipients. In 2019, Harvard awarded 6,665 degrees across the University.Degree candidates with their family and friends, faculty, administrators who supported them, and alumni from around the world are anticipated to participate in Harvard’s 369th Commencement Exercises on May 28.To accommodate the increasing number of people planning to attend, carefully review the additional guidelines governing ticketing, regalia, security precautions, and other important details, which are available online.On Commencement morning, the Harvard gates will open at 6:45. A ticket is required to gain entry into Tercentenary Theatre, the site of the Morning Exercises.Commencement Day overviewThe Morning Exercises begin when the academic procession is seated in Tercentenary Theatre. Three student orators deliver addresses, and the dean of each School introduces the candidates for their respective degrees, which the president then confers. Toward the conclusion of the ceremony the graduating seniors are asked to rise, and the president confers their degrees on them as a group. Honorary degrees are then conferred before the Exercises are adjourned.Diploma-granting ceremonies and luncheons: Graduates and their guests return to their respective undergraduate Houses or graduate and professional Schools. Harvard and Radcliffe College alumni/ae who have celebrated their 50th Reunion are invited to join the Tree Spread luncheon, while all other alumni may pre-purchase tickets for boxed lunches at the Alumni Spread in Harvard Yard.The Afternoon Program features an address by Harvard President Larry Bacow and principal speaker Martin “Marty” Baron. Officially called the Annual Meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association (HAA), this program includes the Overseer and HAA director election results, presentations of the Harvard Medal, and remarks by the HAA president.For general information about Commencement, including event schedules, maps, accommodations for guests with disabilities, and more, visit the Harvard University Commencement Office website.last_img read more

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UCL: Napoli good enough to stop Messi – Manolas

first_img Loading… “For his quality and football intelligence.” read also:Barca to start Messi, Suarez, Griezmann in attack against Napoli Napoli have some injury worries ahead of the tie and Manolas hopes to see Lorenzo Insigne back in time, before he confirmed he was ready to play. “The pressure is all on them,” he said. “I hope Insigne recovers. “I’m fine, the pain in my ribs has passed.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Greece international, Kostas Manolas, has claimed Napoli must stop Lionel Messi ‘as a team’ when the Partenopei travel to Barcelona on Saturday. The former Roma defender was on the scoresheet when the Giallorossi famously eliminated the Blaugrana from the competition in 2017-18, and he revealed Francesco Totti encouraged him to do it again. “I met Totti and he told me: ‘Courage Kostas, try again’,” Manolas told La Repubblica. And the former defender believes it’s possible to stop the Argentine talisman in Catalonia this weekend. “You stop Messi as a team, without fearing his talent,” the 29-year-old added. “In my opinion, he’s the best in the world.Advertisementcenter_img Promoted ContentAir Pollution Is Rapidly Decreasing Thanks To COVID-19What Is A Black Hole And Is It Dangerous For Us All?8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?10 Actors That Started Their Careers On Soaps7 Netflix Shows Cancelled Because They Don’t Get The RatingsBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?9 Movie Scenes That Got Re-Shot Because Viewers Didn’t Like Them6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesTarantino Wants To End His Career With This Movie?last_img read more

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Toshiba CEO promises turnaround in 5 years beefed up ethics

first_imgTOKYO – Nobuaki Kurumatani, the outsider tapped to lead scandal-tarnished Japanese electronics company Toshiba Corp., is promising a turnaround in five years by reshaping its operations and boosting profitability.Kurumatani, the first outsider to be appointed chief executive at Toshiba in more than half a century, acknowledged the system of governance and risk management had been weak. He stressed he brought to the company his experience in the financial sector, where compliance controls were tougher.Toshiba has been embroiled in an accounting scandal involving massive doctoring of books.“I feel that the organization is determined to change,” Kurumatani told reporters Tuesday at Toshiba’s Tokyo headquarters.Toshiba has also racked up heavy losses in its nuclear business and is selling its lucrative computer-chip business to avoid going belly-up.At the centre of the losses is the acquisition of CB&I Stone & Webster by its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse, which filed for bankruptcy protection last year.Kurumatani said the company will withdraw from all overseas nuclear operations, and the future of the energy business is moving toward renewables.Costs of building nuclear reactors have surged due to beefed-up safety measures after a March 2011 accident at a plant in Fukushima in northeastern Japan sent three reactors into meltdowns.“Toshiba has many dedicated employees and talented engineers,” Kurumutani said. “Things go well when things are good. But once things start going wrong, then it keeps going wrong.”Toshiba’s chairman stepped down last year, but veteran Satoshi Tsunakwa has stayed on as president and chief operating officer and will be working with Kurumatani toward a turnaround.Kurumatani’s rise is an effort by Toshiba to put on a fresh face to a long-pristine brand that has plunged from grace not only over the Westinghouse fiasco but also because of spiraling accounting scandals that raised serious questions about its ethical practices.Efforts to reform corporate governance turned up more embarrassing wrongdoing, which dated back years.A graduate of the prestigious University of Tokyo, Kurumatani most recently served as president of CVC Asia Pacific Japan, an investment fund.Before that, he was deputy president and a director at Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, one of Japan’s biggest banking institutions and a major Toshiba lender.Unlike previous Toshiba executives with backgrounds in engineering, Kurumatani built his career in corporate planning, public relations and auditing.Toshiba has been gradually selling off pieces of its operations, such as its medical equipment and household appliance businesses.But the key sale is its prized flash memory chip business to a consortium led by Bain Capital Private Equity. That sale was initially set to be completed in March but is ongoing, awaiting regulatory approval in China, according to Kurumatani.Toshiba has reached a settlement with American computer data storage giant Western Digital, its joint venture partner, which had initially fought the sale.Toshiba still has a sprawling infrastructure business, such as railways, power systems and factory automation. It’s still responsible for running and decommissioning dozens of nuclear reactors in Japan, including those at the Fukushima plant.Toshiba is forecasting a profit for the fiscal year that ended in March, a reversal from the red ink it had expected earlier. It racked up a loss for the previous fiscal year.___Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyamaHer work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/yuri%20kageyamalast_img read more

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MTV acquires SnowGlobe Music Festival

first_imgNEW YORK — MTV is expanding its live events business in the U.S. by acquiring the SnowGlobe Music Festival.The three-day New Year’s Eve festival takes place in South Lake Tahoe, California. This year’s lineup includes Above & Beyond, Diplo, Eric Prydz, Rezz and RL Grime headlining among more than 40 artists. SnowGlobe will also showcase extreme winter sports demonstrations.Terms were not disclosed in Monday’s announcement. MTV says it’s taking the next step in “its resurgence by expanding deeper into live events.”MTV plans to reinvent its New Year’s Eve coverage, connecting SnowGlobe with MTV’s Times Square studio in New York. The cable network also plans to expand SnowGlobe to additional dates and locations worldwide and leverage its team to launch other new events.MTV launched MTV Studios in June.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Northeast BC unemployment rate increased in January 2019

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The unemployment rate in Northeast B.C. saw an increase in January.The unemployment rate in January was 5.5 percent compared to 4.7 percent in December of 2018.January has been the highest recorded unemployment percentage since September 2018 at 5.6 percent, an estimated 39,900 people are employed in a labour force of 42,100. A recent statement made by Bruce Ralston, Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology, on the release of the January Labour Force Survey from Statistics Canada;“As demonstrated in the newest results, higher wages, low unemployment and good jobs in British Columbia show that people are at the centre of our strong and stable economy.Wages continued to rise in January, with B.C. among the top provinces for year-over-year growth. In the past year, B.C.’s average wages grew by 4.1%, the highest among provinces. In fact, 2018 was B.C.’s highest annual wage growth in the past 10 years.B.C.’s unemployment rate remained the lowest in Canada — for the 17th month in a row — at 4.7%. Private sector jobs have been fuelling employment growth in the province, with an increase of 64,800 in the past year.This means people continue to see the benefit of a high-performing economy following many years of wage stagnation.”B.C.’s economy is expected to outperform the rest of Canada over the next three years. The Economic Forecast Council, a group of bank economists and analysts that are independent of government, estimates that B.C.’s real gross domestic product is expected to grow by 2.6% in both 2019 and 2020. “We’re working hard to nurture a sustainable economy that works for people.”last_img read more

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S Korean police apologise for 70yearold island massacre

first_imgSeoul: South Korean police apologised for the first time Wednesday over massacres that killed 10,000 people decades ago and the military expressed deep regret as President Moon Jae-in seeks to re-examine history. On April 3, 1948 members of the communist Workers’ Party of Southern Korea — an ally of the organisation that still rules the North — launched an armed uprising on the southern island of Jeju, attacking a dozen police stations. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US At the time the division of the peninsula had yet to be formalised and the Korean War was still two years away, but the US-supported South was ideologically split following the end of World War II and Japanese colonial rule. The revolt was quickly put down, but while sporadic clashes continued more than 10,000 civilians were killed by South Korean security forces over the next six years, including beyond the end of the Korean War. “We apologise to the innocent people whose lives were sacrificed,” said Min Gap-ryong, the commissioner general of the Korean National Police Agency, at a commemoration of the uprising’s 71st anniversary. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls “We promise to be an organisation that only thinks about and works for Korean citizens so that a tragedy like this will never repeat in our future.” The country’s defence ministry also expressed “deep regret” to the victims, while stopping short of a full apology. The Jeju Incident, as the events are known, remains a highly politicised issue in South Korea, as do some other aspects of the country’s post-war history. Some Jeju-based research and NGOs have claimed it was “Jeju people’s resistance against national division and ‘American Imperialism'”. The police apology and ministry’s expression of regret come after left-leaning South Korean President Moon Jae-in has repeatedly spoken on the importance of “setting our history right”. Moon, who brokered talks between Washington and Pyongyang, has stressed the independence struggle against Japan’s colonial rule is at the heart of national identity in both Koreas, while framing the South’s right-wing — who say the victims of Jeju were all communist rebels — as descendants of pro-Japanese collaborators. Last year, Moon became the first South Korean president in more than a decade to attend the annual memorial ceremony on Jeju. At the event he said: “Young people who were falsely accused of being communists during the April 3 Incident defended their country in the face of death. Ideology was nothing more than a cause that justified the massacre.” In 2003 the then South Korean president Roh Moo-hyun — whom Moon served as chief of staff — offered an apology to the victims of the Jeju incident.last_img read more

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Ohio State panel illuminates discussion on paying college athletes

Vince Doria (far right), Matt Mitten (second from right), Joe Nocera (second from left), and Andrew Zimbalist (far left) are introduced on Friday at the Sports Society Initiative’s forum on paying college athletes. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterThe topic of financial compensation for collegiate student-athletes has been sweeping the nation in recent years, and on Friday, Ohio State, home to one of the country’s most profitable athletic departments, was at the forefront of that discussion.Two separate panel discussions — the first featuring sports policy analysts and writers, and the second consisting of seven former Buckeye athletes — were held on campus in an event organized by the university’s Sports and Society Initiative. The three-hour conversation, titled “Paying College Athletes,” encompassed nearly all sides of the debate, from legal and political angles, to methods and realities of implementation, and to athlete testimonies and alternatives. Dialogue among the panel members was passionate, insightful and respectful, although it jumped around frequently. Yet, that is inherent with any conversation about financial compensation for student-athletes. The issue is so complex, like splitting the atom, that any discussion on it could seem scattered because there are myriad factors to consider and understand.Kristin Watt, an attorney and former OSU basketball player in the 1980s, does not support a pay-to-play model, but she, like the few other panelists with a similar position, completely acknowledged the inequities in the current system. Although she said there likely will be inequities no matter what, there are “absolutely” problems that can be fixed.“Forums like this, I really want to congratulate Ohio State for putting this on,” said Watt, who was on the second panel. “The more we talk about it, the more issues get out and the more people get educated … That’s what helps spur changes.” A high point during the event was when former OSU running back Maurice Clarett delivered his opening statement. Despite his dominant freshman season for the Buckeyes in 2002, Clarett is infamous for his off-the-field tribulations, which included accepting improper benefits that played a role in his dismissal from the university and spending more than three years in prison on multiple charges. When Clarett spoke, the some hundred people in the audience were captivated, clinging to his every word. Clarett said he “absolutely” supports a pay-for-play model for collegiate athletes, citing his personal story as evidence. Growing up in the poverty in Youngstown, Ohio, Clarett said he took money under the table to help him pay personal expenses, namely fixing his car’s transmission. “My spiral of events wouldn’t have happen if I had money,” Clarett said passionately. Clarett said his situation — coming from poverty and needing support beyond just an academic scholarship — is no anomaly. Clarett also spoke poignantly about the lack of emphasis that some programs place on education. Clarett said he was nowhere near the education level needed at OSU and that he was shuffled through classes just to stay eligible. This is common, Clarett said, with those coming from inner city schools. At one point, amid the Youngstown native’s emotional soliloquy on academics, Lawrence Funderburke, a panelist and former OSU basketball player, interpreted. “Preach it,” he said. “Keep preaching.”As Clarett’s opening statement wrapped up, a few members of the audience stood up, applauding. Vince Doria, former Senior Vice President and Director of News at ESPN, started the discussion on the first panel. Doria, an OSU graduate, acknowledged his past employer’s role in the growth of big-time college athletics through massive television deals, yet he said he supports a pay-to-play system. His proposal contains different tiers of payment for players in revenue sports based mostly on playing time. It might not be perfect, Doria said, but at the very least, it “begins to address the unfairness of the current system.” A key portion of Doria’s rationale for supporting additional compensation beyond academic scholarship is that the notion of providing education is misleading, he said. “A scholarship is really the opportunity to achieve an education,” he said. Doria said with the vigorious schedule that athletes have because of games and training, they don’t get the same chance to work outside of the classroom to really take full advantage of the scholarship and obtain a comprehensive education. Joe Nocera, a sports business columnist at The New York Times and co-author of “Indentured: The Inside Story of the Rebellion Against the NCAA,” is outspoken about the reforms he feels are necessary. Nocera left no room for where he stood on the issue, enunciating his clear support for paying student-athletes. In fact, Nocera said he even believes that the term “student-athlete” is incorrect.“(The NCAA) shouldn’t call them student-athletes, but rather athlete-students or employee students, because that’s what they really are,” he said. “Let’s be honest about what the NCAA is. … it’s a cartel.”Former OSU basketball player Kristin Watt (right) speaks at a forum about paying college athletes while former OSU running back Maurice Clarett (left) listens. Credit: Mitch Hooper | Lantern reporterWhen Nocera first began writing about the injustices he believes college athletes face, he said he got emails from readers asking why he was spending his time writing about it. His explanation, delivered passionately on Friday, pierced the crowd.“This is not a sports issue. This is a human rights issue and civil rights issue,” said Nocera, who also brought up the NCAA’s transfer policy, which he denounced. “I came at this through the prism of rights, not pay.” Watt, the former OSU basketball player, was not alone in her opposition to a pay-to-play model. Joining her in dissent was a Marscilla Packer, a fellow former OSU basketball player, Funderburke and Andrew Zimbalist, an economics professor at Smith College in Massachusetts. “I think there are meaningful reforms that can address the economic injustices without going for the pay-for-play model,” said Zimbalist, who cited concerns over growing television revenue and the complicated tax-exempt status donations to athletic departments have. Some of the most common agreed upon reforms that did not involve a direct cash payment included guaranteed scholarships lasting at least four years. Currently, they are for one year, with the option to be renewed. Lifetime health insurance was another proposal that seemed to be agreed upon by all 11 panelists. Nocera said it’s clear that if an athlete sustains injuries while playing sports in college for a university, it’s the school’s duty to make sure the individual has the proper care he or she needs during his or her lifetime. Funderburke, who founded a youth organization after retiring from the NBA, said he has a five-point plan to help student-athletes that does not involve a pay-for-play system. It included mentoring arrangements, life-skills courses for athletes, a deferred-savings stipend and a family emergency fund. “We’re never going to be fair or equitable, but we can at least be sensible,” he said. If there is one thing the panel illustrated, it’s that there is a lot to consider when looking to address injustices in college athletics. Change isn’t going to happen overnight, but having open forums like the panel can prove to be instrumental, said Kelly Trent, a former OSU golfer who is “on the fence” on specifics but agrees collegiate sports are littered with inequity. “For this thing to advance, it’s going to take some giving on both sides,” said Doria, the former executive at ESPN. “And the history of the NCAA in that area hasn’t been good.” read more

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Michigan falls to Louisville in title game

Buckeye fans won’t have to worry about their archrival celebrating a national championship in basketball this season. The Michigan Wolverines fell Monday night to the Louisville Cardinals, 82-76, in the national championship game. Louisville became the eighth school to win three, or more, national championships and coach Rick Pitino becomes the first coach in history to win a national title at two different schools. In a fast-paced game that saw a combined 158 points, the game came down to the fight in the paint. Louisville’s sophomore forward Chane Behanan made a big impact during the second half, with 12 rebounds that eventually wore down a perimeter oriented Wolverine team. Coming into the game, it was thought that standout freshman forward Mitch McGary would handle the inside for Michigan. However, it was the Cardinals who played with an increased physicality, including eight rebounds and three blocks from junior center Gorgui Dieng. It can also be said that the game was won by the Cardinals well before the second half as they withstood an Wolverine run from an unlikely source. Freshman point guard Spike Albrecht averages 1.8 points per game and saw sporadic playing time during the tournament, but the young guard exploded with a bevy of threes and dropped 17 points in his first 16 minutes of play to give Michigan a 12-point lead at 33-21. With 11:09 to play in the first half, Michigan sophomore guard Trey Burke was hit with his second foul. Michigan coach John Beilein made a crucial decision to sit his star point-guard for the remainder of the first half. The Cardinals capitalized on Burke’s absence by turning up the pressure and going on a run of their own. Louisville junior guard Luke Hancock hit four 3-pointers down the stretch of the first half to whittle the Michigan lead down to one. Louisville carried the momentum through the second half to bring the national title back to the Bluegrass State for a second consecutive season after Kentucky won the national championship last season. The Wolverines were not able to bring the Big Ten a national championship on a year where the conference was considered by many to be the strongest in college basketball. Some Buckeye fans reluctantly pulled for the Wolverines in a display of conference pride, but the Cardinals were just too tough and experienced for their opponents. Hancock was named Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four after two breakout performances. The transfer from George Mason dropped 20 much needed points in the national semifinal against Wichita State, before adding another 22 off the bench in Monday’s title game. read more

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Giggs wants Bale not to change clubs

first_imgRyan Giggs is convinced that Real Madrid is the right club for his national team start player, Gareth Bale, and he advised him to stay in Spain despite his situation hasn’t been easy.The Wales star has struggled to gain his regular spot in the starting eleven under Zinedine Zidane and he has been expected to change clubs sooner or later but his national team’s coach believes that it wouldn’t be the right choice.The former Manchester United player spoke about Bale’s situation as he said, according to Sky Sports:“Yes. I went to see him against PSG [in the Champions League last-16].”“When you go there the aura around the club, there are only a handful of clubs who have got that.”Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“So, of course, you want to stay there. He’s won three Champions League titles, the proof is in that.”“When you are at clubs like that you are always going to win things.”“I learned a lot when I was (United) manager for the four games and about how lonely it was.”“When you shut the door of your office and everyone else has gone home, you’re on your own.”last_img read more

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FA charge Jurgen Klopp for postmatch comments on referee

first_imgLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp has been formally charged by the English Football Association (FA) for his post-match comments against West Ham on February 4.The German was heavily critical of referee Kevin Friend at the end of Liverpool’s 1-1 draw against West Ham at the London Stadium.It marked the Reds’ second successive draw and handed title rivals Manchester City the chance to leapfrog them into top spot of the Premier League, albeit having played a game more.Sadio Mane had given Liverpool the lead in the match with a questionable goal that had James Milner seemingly offside during the build-up to the opener.Due to this, Klopp suggested that Friend had favoured West Ham in the 50-50 decisions during the second half despite it only taking the hosts six minutes to get back level through Michail Antonio.“There were so many situations where it was 50-50 or 60-40… [he gave a] free-kick for the other team,” Klopp told Sky Sports.“As a human being, I know if I make a big mistake in the first half, I don’t want to open the gap even more.”Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.But the FA were not amused with Klopp’s comments, which breaches the Rule E3, and have now formally charged him.“Jurgen Klopp has today been charged with a breach of FA Rule E3,” read a FA statement.“It is alleged that comments he made in a post-match interview following Liverpool’s league game against West Ham United on February 4, 2019, breached Rule E3(1) as they questioned the integrity of the match referee and/or implied bias.”Klopp will have until Monday evening at 7:00 PM (CET) to answer to the FA’s charge.The 51-year-old is currently in Marbella, Spain, at a training camp as Liverpool prepare for the first leg of their last-16 Champions League clash against Bayern Munich at Anfield next Tuesday night.The Reds will then take on rivals Manchester United at Old Trafford five days later in the Premier League.LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND – JANUARY 19: Sadio Mane of Liverpool celebrates with teammates after scoring his sides fourth goal during the Premier League match between Liverpool FC and Crystal Palace at Anfield on January 19, 2019 in Liverpool, United Kingdom. (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)last_img read more

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