How the Ebenezer Baptist Church has been a seat of Black…

first_img Please enter your name here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSAfrican American TheologyEbenezer Baptist ChurchFaithInspirationMartin Luther King Jr.The Conversation Previous articleCity of Apopka ranks in top 15% for 2020’s safest small city in FloridaNext articleMLK: Protest with resolve, and without violence Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate center_img Faith and InspirationBy Jason Oliver Evans, University of VirginiaThe high-stakes U.S. Senate race in Georgia catapulted the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church back into the spotlight. For 135 years, the church played a vital role in the fight against racism and the civil rights movement. It was the spiritual home of the civil rights leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.It is now the home of the state’s first Black senator – the Rev. Raphael Warnock, the senior pastor at the church.As a scholar of African American religion and Christian theology, I believe it is important to understand how the Ebenezer Baptist Church has been a seat of Black power and organizing for generations in Atlanta.‘Stone of help’Ebenezer Baptist Church, a predominantly African American congregation, was founded in 1886, nearly 20 years after the end of the Civil War. The pastor, Rev. John Andrew Parker, served as Ebenezer’s first pastor from 1886 to 1894. Little is known about Parker and Ebenezer’s early years. But according to historian Benjamin C. Ridgeway, Parker organized the church in a small building located on Airline Avenue in Atlanta.The name Ebenezer, meaning “stone of help,” comes from the Hebrew Bible. In the First Book of Samuel, the Israelites are said to have gathered in the town of Mizpah to offer burnt offerings to God. When their enemies, the Philistines, received notice that the Israelites were in Mizpah, they sent forces to attack them.With God’s help, the Philistines were eventually defeated. Prophet Samuel then named a large stone “Ebenezer” to remind the Israelites of God’s intervention in their battle against the Philistine army.As historians Roswell F. Jackson and Rosalyn M. Patterson observed in their 1989 article, “The selection of the name Ebenezer, ‘Stone of help,’ was profoundly prophetic.” In their view, Ebenezer’s name proved fitting to describe the role the church would come to have in the subsequent civil rights movement.Growth of the churchThe Rev. Adam Daniel Williams, the maternal grandfather of King, served as the second pastor from 1894 to 1931. Williams led the Ebenezer Church into the 20th century as a religious community mobilized to fight the segregationist policies plaguing the African American community in the state of Georgia.By 1913, the church had grown from 13 to nearly 750 members. Williams developed a distinct form of the social gospel, which emphasized the importance of African Americans owning businesses and taking social action against racial and economic injustice in their local communities.Known for his powerful preaching, impressive organizing, and leadership skills, Williams led several initiatives, including boycotts against a local Atlanta newspaper, “The Georgian,” which was known for using racist language against African Americans.In 1906, Williams led a fight to end the white primary system which prohibited African Americans from voting in the Georgia primaries. In 1917, Williams helped establish the Atlanta chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the NAACP.A year later, he was elected as branch president of the Atlanta chapter of the NAACP, and, within five months of his tenure, the chapter’s membership grew to 1,400.As religious historian Lewis Baldwin remarks in his book “The Voice of Conscience,” “Clearly, Williams used the [Ebenezer] church as a power base and rallying point for such activities, an approach that would also be used by [Martin Luther] King, Sr. and King, Jr.”Working for social changeFollowing Williams’ death in 1931, the Rev. Martin Luther King Sr., Ebenezer’s assistant pastor, and Williams’ son-in-law, became the church’s third pastor. During his 40-year tenure as pastor, “Daddy” King, as he was affectionately known, led Ebenezer with a mixture of evangelical faith and progressive social action.Finding warrant for social action in the Christian scriptures, King Sr. challenged other Black churches to embrace the social gospel – a late 19th-century Protestant movement that emphasized the application of the Christian message to the social and moral concerns of society.Moreover, King Sr. led marches and rallies to protest discriminatory and segregationist policies in the city of Atlanta, including the desegregation of the Atlanta Police Department and the Atlanta Board of Education. In the first 15 years of King Sr.‘s pastorate at Ebenezer, church membership grew to 3,700.MLK’s spiritual homeMartin Luther King Jr. Annual Commemorative Service at Ebenezer Baptist Church on Jan. 21, 2019, in Atlanta, Ga. Paras Griffin/Getty ImagesEbenezer came into the global spotlight when Martin Luther King Jr. accepted the call to join his father as co-pastor in 1960. Before then, King had pastored Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama from 1954 to 1959.During his tenure at Dexter Avenue, King served as president of the Montgomery Improvement Association, the organization which successfully led the Montgomery Bus Boycott from Dec. 5, 1955, to Dec. 20, 1956. In 1959, King resigned from his position as pastor at Dexter Avenue to serve alongside his father as well as serve as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which is also based in Atlanta.From the pulpit of Ebenezer, King preached some of his more memorable sermons. In one of his sermons published in a collection titled “The Strength to Love,” King describes racial prejudice as indicative of “softmindedness,” a person’s tendency to uncritically adhere to unsupportable beliefs.In the same sermon, titled “A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart,” King argued, “Race prejudice is based on groundless fears, suspicions, and misunderstandings.” To overcome this, King argued that human beings must cultivate both a tough mind and a tender heart, a joining of a critical mind with a concern for fellow human beings.This message reverberates in contemporary movements for racial equity and justice, including the Black Lives Matter movement. While many BLM members are not affiliated with any organized religion, the movement emphasizes the importance of spiritual wellness for African Americans as they fight for Black liberation.Since its inception, Ebenezer Baptist Church has been an institution in which evangelical fervor and progressive social activism joined to foster societal change.This year, the COVID-19 pandemic has prevented the spiritual home of King from hosting the annual commemorative service in honor of the slain civil rights leader, which usually draws 1,700 attendees. But attention to the church has been renewed following the election of Pastor Warnock to the U.S. Senate.One cannot appreciate the importance of MLK Day without understanding the tradition that formed one of America’s most influential civil rights leaders.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. preaching from his pulpit in 1960 at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. Dozier Mobley/Getty Images The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more

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Food for thought, and testing

first_imgFar from the beaten path of Harvard Square, with its austere libraries and scurrying students, Valerie Nelson is freezing food.Not just any food, but some of the University’s food, which is kept for an undisclosed amount of time in an unidentified location, all in the interest of safety and public health.Nelson is a safety ninja. You might’ve seen her, though most likely not. She’s one of a group of clandestine food inspectors who show up unannounced at some of Harvard’s most publicized events, including Commencement. She was there, sampling the catering trays while using individually wrapped tongue depressors — “Much to the dismay of people serving wonderful things like filet mignon,” she revealed — and was in and out before anyone could stop short, exiting into a haze of fog.“Ninety percent of what I do is under the radar,” said Nelson, whose office is on the outskirts of campus. “It’s a part of the protection of the health and safety of the community that people are not aware of, but it’s happening behind the scenes all the time.”Food samples are refrigerated for three days (most food-borne illnesses emerge during that time, Nelson said) before being frozen, or “archived” for later testing should a need arise.A registered sanitarian, Nelson is public health manager for Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) at the University. She has a litany of responsibilities, but mostly oversees food safety. She’s on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Her program consists solely of her and one part-time staffer.“We’re a one-and-a-half-person team,” she said, though she regularly enlists the help of EHS colleagues who are industrial hygienists, chemists, and biologists.Her team conducts unannounced food safety audits, and her coverage includes the campus’s residential and retail dining spots, Crimson Catering, the Harvard Faculty Club, FAS student grills, and the Dudley House Co-op. “We provide feedback and training based on the results of those audits,” she said.The inspections are less scary than they might seem. Nelson ensures that food is correctly prepared, stored, and served. She works with outside caterers, makes sure they are properly credentialed, and monitors food recalls by the Food and Drug Administration. “We bounce that information out to others so they can check their products and not serve a food that may be potentially unsafe,” she said.But Nelson acknowledges that even outside the office her job has its occupational hazards.“I’ll go to a potluck supper, look at the potentially hazardous foods, and determine which ones I think are safe to eat,” she said with a laugh.Before coming to Harvard, Nelson worked as a city health inspector. “People always asked me where they shouldn’t eat,” she said. “Due to confidentiality, I could never reveal that, so instead I just told them to watch where I go to eat on Friday night and follow me there.”An avid swimmer, Nelson relishes Massachusetts’ lakes, though she sometimes considers the transmissibility of influenza via waterfowl. “I don’t think most people worry about those things,” she joked. “My job does affect me. It’s hard for it not to.”Her advice to those of us cooking today: “It’s important to keep food refrigerated at 41 degrees or below, and to wash your hands before you start. My motto is: Prevent.”last_img read more

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Gardai looking for owner of this flash BMW – no kidding!

first_imgGardai in Letterkenny have issued an appeal for the owner of this red BMW and they’re not kidding.Well, actually they are.The red sporty child’s BMW was found today in Letterkenny Town and is now at the Garda Station. A spokesman said “Is this fast car yours? Are you furious that you have lost it?“We are sure that there is a child somewhere missing it!”Please call Letterkenny Gardaí on 0749167100 if you are the owner.And no, there are no outstanding parking tickets on it….. Gardai looking for owner of this flash BMW – no kidding! was last modified: December 14th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Warriors’ Draymond Green sees “double standard” in NBA’s punishments for Lakers-Rockets scuffles

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile device “It seems like a little bit of a … DENVER – The Lakers-Rockets scuffle on Saturday entertained Warriors forward Draymond Green so much that he pushed back his bedtime for another 75 minutes. Green expressed annoyance, though, that the NBA handed suspensions to Lakers forward Brandon Ingram (four), Lakers guard Rajon Rondo (three) and Rockets guard Chris Paul (two) in relation to his own punishments.last_img

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Comrades entry deadline reached

first_img29 November 2013Entries for the 2014 Comrades Marathon will close at the end of business on Friday, a day earlier than had been planned because the cap of 18 000 runners has been reached ahead of schedule.In recent years the cap has been implemented for logistical and organisational purposes; the race has been oversubscribed since 2009.Online and in-house entries at the Comrades Marathon offices in Pietermaritzburg will close at 16:30 on Friday. However, Comrades Marathon Association (CMA) General Manager Chris Bruwer said: “We will still accept postal entries, but they must be postmarked by the Post Office with [the] date of 29 November 2013. Entries made after this date will be rejected.”Heightened interestSince a massive entry in 2010, when the Guinness World Records recognised the Comrades Marathon as the biggest ultra-marathon in the world, and the event was named the winner of the Virgin Active Sport Industry Awards for South Africa’s “Best Sport Participation Event”, there has been a heightened interest in the race, which was first run in 1921.The 2010 race, which benefited from the excitement surrounding the 2010 Fifa World Cup, had 23 568 entries, with 14 343 runners finishing before the 12-hour cut-off time.The iconic road running race enjoys recognition as Africa’s oldest marathon and ultra-marathon at the Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS).2014 raceNext year’s event will be the 89th running of the Comrades Marathon. It was only during the Second World War, in the years from 1941 to 1945, that it was not held.Pietermaritzburg will host the start of next year’s Comrades Marathon on Sunday, 1 June. Competitors are allowed up to 12 hours to reach the finish in Durban.The defending men’s champion will be South African Claude Moshiywa, while Elena Nurgalieva, the defending women’s champion, will have an opportunity to match Bruce Fordyce’s nine wins in the race.SAinfo reporter and Comrades Marathonlast_img read more

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Video Editing Behind-the-Scenes: Saturday Night Live

first_imgThink you’ve worked under some tight deadlines? Try cutting a complex spot for Saturday Night Live, roughly 24 hours before it airs.SNL’s ‘The Beygency‘ has exploded online over the last week. The spot is a faux film trailer based on a fictionalized government agency that enforces positive fandom toward Beyonce – really, you’ve just got to see it. High production value, great plays on trailer cliches and loads of laughs…it’s no wonder it’s been an online hit. Take a look:But what we love even more than the spot itself, is getting a behind-the-scenes look at how it was created…FastCompany recently got some feedback from the editor of the spot, Adam Epstein. Starting at 4pm on Friday afternoon the video editing team worked around the clock to get the spot ready for air on Saturday night. In fact, the video wasn’t even finalized until after it aired, with the final tweaks being made for the online version. Editors take note: the crew from SNL is using Premiere Pro.Here’s a timelapse of the editing in action, along with corresponding time clock. If you ever feel overwhelmed by a deadline in the edit bay – it could always be harder, right?last_img read more

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The characters in Idomeneus have been through war and so have the

first_img Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Michelle Monteith, left, Frank Cox-O’Connell, right, and Jakob Ehman, front, with the Idomeneus Chorus in Soulpepper’s Idomeneus. (JOSE JOHN) Advertisement They’ve been through the wars.Ten actors in the Soulpepper Theatre company face the audience, standing on black gravel against a stained concrete back wall. The black box of the theatre that surrounds them is also mottled and dirty (set design is by Lorenzo Savoini). They’re wearing shades of grey: contemporary clothes designed by Gillian Gallow, covered in what looks like paint, dirt, maybe bird dung. It clings to their faces and hair, too. They look exhausted but determined, and they stare at the audience for an uncomfortably long time. This is the opening image of Alan Dilworth’s striking production of Idomeneus, a poetic drama that retells the story of the titular Cretan king’s return from the Trojan War. While Homer’s Iliad tells a happy version of this tale, other versions narrate his fate and that of his country very differently. The preoccupation of Roland Schimmelpfennig’s play is this narrative instability: over 70 minutes various versions of his story stop, start and layer over each other.center_img Advertisement Advertisement Twitter Login/Register With:last_img read more

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