NAFCU raises overtime proposal concerns with lawmakers

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NAFCU Executive Vice President of Government Affairs and General Counsel Carrie Hunt raised concerns Tuesday about potential unintended consequences from the Labor Department’s overtime proposal in a letter to the leaders of the Senate Small Business Committee.In advance of the committee’s hearing on the proposed rule today, Hunt noted NAFCU’s concerns about how credit unions might be disproportionately burdened by the rule.“We are concerned that the effect of more than doubling the minimum overtime exempt salary would be to disproportionately burden credit unions in underserved and non-urban communities,” Hunt wrote. “Additionally, NAFCU has concerns that the DOL’s proposal fails to adequately consider the needs of small businesses, including credit unions around the country which operate with extremely low financial margins in a highly competitive service-driven marketplace.” continue reading »last_img read more

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It won’t be easy to remove inspectors

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionReferring to the Dec. 13 editorial encouraging the state to pass a law that would revoke the certification of any building inspector who is found to be guilty of misconduct, don’t think it will be a simple matter.  The certificates they are issued indicates that the candidate has attended mandatory training and that he or she has passed a test. That certification can help a local government decide if a candidate has achieved a basic level of competence. But it doesn’t end there.Don’t forget the civil service system. Who is going to fight to fire this unscrupulous worker who is entitled to due process? I guess that would have to be the local government. Lots of luck there.There are approximately 1,500 local governments in the state. Add in 60 counties and numerous state agencies that also have code enforcement responsibilities. The state is already required to train all if them. What kind of program could the financially strapped state possibly come up with to monitor, investigate and possibly litigate all of the allegations that could arise from such a program. How does one define misconduct?Was the Jay Street fire a result of misconduct or just plain stupidity? Was the inspector incompetent or was he unscrupulously guilty of misconduct. Was the inspector asked to do more than he was capable of? All of these questions will be put to a jury. How could the state rule that he was guilty of misconduct and take away his certification if the court can’t even do it.I don’t think the state would want to be in the middle of that argument.It sounds good on paper. But unless the state comes up with the money to develop and implement any kind of meaningful program, it will be doomed from the start.Don’t get your hopes up.  Roy ScottSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%last_img read more

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Van Haal defiant over Man Utd losses

first_imgAlso last night, Liverpool battled their way to a scoreless draw against Augsburg in Germany.And Tottenham played-out a 1-all draw against their hosts, Fiorentina in Italy. Despite last night’s humiliating 2-1 defeat to FC Midtjylland in the Europa League, the United boss insists that the club can still salvage their season.Van Gaal will be hoping that last night’s away goal by Memphis Depay can help their prospects during the return-leg at Old Trafford.He’s also got to try and pick-up his players ahead of Monday’s FA Cup trip to face Shrewsbury Town…last_img

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Qatar World Cup a ‘blatant mistake’, says FIFA executive Theo Zwanziger

first_imgAwarding the 2022 soccer World Cup to Qatar’s desert state was a “blatant mistake” FIFA executive committee member Theo Zwanziger said, adding that staging the tournament in winter would be just as big a problem.German Zwanziger’s attack on the decision to give the tiny energy-rich Gulf state the world’s biggest single sports event comes after FIFA president Sepp Blatter repeated his view that the finals could not be played in the traditional summer slot.“It was a blatant mistake,” Zwanziger, formerly head of the German football federation (DfB) told Sportbild magazine, referring to the decision taken by world soccer’s governing body in December 2010.Zwanziger, who joined the FIFA executive the following year, also said shifting the tournament to the winter months would put the unity of German football in danger.“Changing the World Cup to the winter is going deep into the structures of European national federations and also amateur football in Germany.”“A change in playing schedules does not only affect the Bundesliga but continues affecting lower divisions due to the link with promotion and relegation. The game pyramid is in danger and so is the unity of German football.” Moving the World Cup to the winter would have a seismic effect on soccer scheduling in Europe.Many leagues outside Britain have a winter break but would need a hiatus of at least six weeks to accommodate national teams preparing for, and playing at, the World Cup finals.The English Premier League, despite not having a winter break, has repeatedly voiced its strong disagreement with moving the tournament to the winter months.“A winter World Cup would mean public viewing with ice skating boots in freezing temperatures,” said Zwanziger.“If the decision was really a mistake it should be lifted and should not become an even bigger burden for those who are not involved by changing it to the winter.” Moving the World Cup to January or February would also have an impact on attendances and television viewing figures for other sporting events like the Australian Open tennis tournament, skiing and the Winter Olympics.Blatter said a month after the decision was taken that he expected the tournament to be moved to the winter. Last week he said a summer World Cup in Qatar was out of the question.Temperatures in Qatar in June and July regularly hit 40C (104f) or higher with 45C (113f) recorded last month.“You can cool down the stadiums but you can’t cool down the whole country and you can’t simply cool down the ambience of a World Cup,” Blatter told a conference in Austria.“The players must be able to play in the best conditions to play a good World Cup.” Blatter had previously stressed that any request to change the timing of the 2022 World Cup would have to come from the organisers but said last week that the FIFA executive committee would meet to discuss the issue in October.last_img read more

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