Outbreak of COVID-19 at St. Joseph County Jail, changes looming for courts

first_img WhatsApp Facebook (Tommie Lee/95.3 MNC) There has been a spike in coronavirus cases at the St. Joseph County Jail, with dozens of inmates and staff testing positive in the past week.35 inmates tested positive on Friday alone, according to the South Bend Tribune. Another 75 inmates were quarantined because of close contacts.Among the dozen staffers, who tested positive are four nurses, the Tribune reported. Several other staffers are in quarantine.St. Joseph County courts are set to postpone jury trials, suspend hearings and consider releasing some inmates from the county jail and Juvenile Justice Center due to the rise in COVID-19 cases.The limits on court activity and lighter prisoner load are expected to stay in effect through the month of February, the Tribune reported. WhatsApp Pinterest CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews By Jon Zimney – November 18, 2020 0 310 Google+ Twitter Twitter Previous articleIndiana’s First Couple is quarantining after a possible COVID-19 exposureNext articleElkhart County to enter the COVID-19 red zone Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Outbreak of COVID-19 at St. Joseph County Jail, changes looming for courts Google+ Pinterest Facebooklast_img read more

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Plant spacing

first_imgBy Gary L. WadeUniversity of GeorgiaMost landscapes today are overplanted. With too many plants forthe given area, each plant is less healthy, requires moremaintenance and just doesn’t look as good as it should.The really sad thing is that such landscapes cost more money thanthey should, too. If you’re planning a new landscape or shoppingfor plants to add to your landscape, proper plant spacing is agreat way to stretch your dollars.It’s hard to imagine cute little 1-gallon plants growing 10 feetwide within five years. But knowing the mature size and shape ofthe plants you want can help you avoid buying more than you need.Move over, BudWhen plants are spaced too closely in the landscape, they begincompeting for space, light, water and nutrients. Internal foliagebegins to die off. Air circulation within the plant canopy isrestricted, and the plants become stressed and more susceptibleto insect and disease problems.Close spacing reduces curb appeal, too, when plants lose theirindividuality and are sheared as huge blobs of intertwining greenfoliage.Horizontal groundcover junipers, like Shore and Blue Rug, willform layer upon layer of foliage when they are planted tooclosely.Creating choresWhen this happens, the dense inner growth begins to die out, andit becomes a haven for spider mites and twig blight diseases. Toavoid these problems, thinning the plant canopy to increase lightinfiltration and air circulation becomes an essential chore everythree to five years.Shrubs look their best when they have enough space to achievetheir full size and shape without fighting for space with theirneighbor.The label that comes on the plant often tells about the plant’smature height and width. But it doesn’t hurt to double-check formore information in a horticultural reference book or on the Web.Whoa!I recently bought several dwarf Burford hollies, for instance,and the label said they grew 12 inches to 15 inches tall andwide. Fortunately, I knew the plant grows 12 to 15 feet tall andwide. The label was misprinted. What a disaster this would havebeen if I had planted them 12 inches apart!One of the most commonly used foundation plants is dwarf Yauponholly. This plant will eventually grow 8 feet high and 8 feetwide. Ideal spacing, then, would be 8 feet apart.Hedge plants are often planted so their canopies touch,particularly if they’re to be sheared into a formal look. To dothis, take the projected mature width of the shrub and decreaseit by 2 feet. In other words, if the plants’ mature width is 12feet, space them 10 feet apart in the row to allow the canopiesto overlap slightly.Happy plantsBy spacing plants properly, you’ll likely find that you don’tneed as many plants as you thought you did. The landscape maylook a little sparsely planted at first. But it will growhealthier, require less maintenance and look better.It will stretch your landscaping dollars, too. That’s somethingyou can bank on.(Gary Wade is an Extension Horticulturist with the Universityof Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more

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