Watch Jerry Garcia And Phil Lesh Explain The Origins Of “Grateful Dead” In Clip From New Documentary

first_imgAfter years and years of anticipation, delays, and a variety of obstacles, the long-awaited Grateful Dead documentary Long Strange Trip will be made available to the public on May 26th via Amazon Prime Video. The film, produced by legendary filmmaker Martin Scorsese and directed by Amir Bar-Lev, made its debut at the acclaimed Sundance Film Festival earlier this year to glowing reviews. Running nearly four hours in length, this sprawling look at the history of one of the most influential bands in American music history features in-depth interviews from roadies, band members and extended Dead family members, along with incredible unseen behind-the-scenes and live footage spanning from the band members’ childhood through the various rungs of their climb to success.Long Awaited Grateful Dead Documentary Will Soon Be Available On AmazonEarlier this week, Entertainment Weekly posted an exclusive clip from the movie, which features interspersed video interviews of Garcia (from the ’90s) and bassist Phil Lesh (in the present day) talking about the origin of the band’s name. As they explain in the clip, the band had been using the name The Warlocks, but after discovering another group with that name, they had to pick a new moniker. While brainstorming ideas, Jerry opened a dictionary to a random page, and written on the page, nestled in the small print, were the words “Grateful Dead.” You can check out the clip below, via EW:The movie is broken into six distinct parts, touching on Jerry Garcia’s well documented history of drug addiction, the complications of the band’s increased popularity in the 80s and the unique community that grew an unwieldy size by the early 90s. While the film’s scope is wider than any film about the band to date, it is less concerned with displaying a detailed chronology of The Grateful Dead and more focused on conveying the bands adventurous and idiosyncratic essence–how their music manifested as a truly communal artistic effort, and garnered a following closer to that of a religion than that of a rock and roll band. As clips, clues, and reviews continue to surface ahead of its public release, our level of excitement could not be higher for the long-awaited Long Strange Trip this May![h/t – Entertainment Weekly]last_img read more

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For love of the creepy, crawly

first_imgMore than 200 biologists who study the creepy, crawly world of insects, clams, snails, and other invertebrates are at Harvard this week, exchanging ideas and getting to know each other in the 2nd International Congress on Invertebrate Morphology.The biologists, who hail from about 20 countries, are participating in a four-day event ending Thursday (June 23) that is packed with technical presentations and discussions on invertebrate form, function, and development.Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Gonzalo Giribet, the incoming president of the International Society of Invertebrate Morphology, organized the event, which is hosted by Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH).Attendees will hear discussions of neurophylogeny, or the study of the nervous system and its use to determine how creatures are related to each other, developmental biology, the morphological evolution of arthropods, and invertebrates as parasites, among other topics.Giribet said attendees not only will share new findings and discuss scientific trends, but will also be able to examine special collections at the MCZ and at its Ernst Mayr Library. They’ll also examine the glass sea creatures, a lesser-known collection created in the 1800s by the artists who created the HMNH’s famed glass flowers, the Blaschkas.last_img read more

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Baby, It’s Cold Outside

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Forget what the calendar says, winter is here. Long Islanders woke up to chilly conditions Tuesday with gusty winds and temperatures in the low 30s. Forecasters at the National Weather Service in Upton expect a high near 34 Tuesday, but wind chill values between 15 and 25 degrees will make it feel much colder. Forecasters predict gusts as high as 33 mph. The mercury will drop in the evening hours, with meteorologists calling for a low of 21 and wind chill values between 10 and 15 degrees. Sure, it’s blistery, but it could be worse. In Buffalo, residents are dealing with up to 3 feet of snow. The deluge forced officials to close a long stretch of the New York State Thruway and other state roads. There’s no snow in the forecast for the Island in the near future, but the chilly temperatures will hang around. The forecast for Wednesday calls for sunny skies with a high of 33 and wind chill values between 10 and 20 degrees. There will be daytime relief from the cold Thursday and Friday with temperatures in the low 40s but dropping significantly at night.last_img read more

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Central College’s $38,000 tuition rate reset to $18,600

first_imgPELLA — Central College in Pella has unveiled what college officials say will be a clearer and easier to understand tuition schedule and replacing its published $38,000 tuition rate.Central College president Mark Putnam says annual tuition will be $18,600, starting in the fall of 2020.“The price change begins a new approach to tuition in Iowa,” Putnam says, “offering transparency and rationality to what students and parents actually pay.”Putnam says nearly all private colleges and universities publish high tuition rates — causing sticker shock for prospective students who don’t realize that with scholarships and financial aid, they will pay significantly less.“Over the past several years, we’ve been looking very carefully at tuition and trying to understand how things are changing in this marketplace,” Putnam says.Putnam says the new tuition rate of 18-thousand-600 means Central students will pay about the same amount as students pay to attend Iowa’s three public universities. Putnam points to a meeting last winter with the parents of prospective students as a crystallizing moment.“There was a mother of an admitted student who was in the audience and she raised her hand,” he says, “and she said the following — and I’ll never forget it: ‘Why is tuition so high? I don’t understand. Why don’t you just charge what it costs?’”Putnam says no current Central student will pay more next year in tuition than they are paying for this academic year. Central college officials say they’ve had record fundraising in the past year for scholarships. There are currently 269 endowed scholarships for Central students.last_img read more

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