Sensitive art

first_img The daytime look of Geros’ public art installation at the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer Latent (e)Scapes Recent Harvard Graduate School of Design graduate Christina Leigh Geros is the winner of Radcliffe’s biennial public art competition. Her exhibit, “Latent (e)Scapes,” consists of 1,600, 1/8-inch acrylic rods that glow. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer A jury of Harvard faculty members including Radcliffe Dean Lizabeth Cohen selects the winner.“The public art competition invites students throughout the Harvard community to be part of Radcliffe’s mission of advanced study by being creative outside the classroom,” said Cohen. “Latent (e)Scapes is a breathtaking visual statement. And it’s also an inspiring blend of art, science, and landscape that captures well Radcliffe’s commitment to supporting work that crosses disciplines in new ways.”Inspiration struck Geros during January break in 2013. On a drive from the East Coast to Kansas, she was taken with the waving dune grasses along the New England shore and their icy inland counterparts — “a family of tall grasses frozen in time” that blanketed much of the Midwest state.“I had this idea that if those grasses were of a synthetic material but within a naturalistic environment to some degree … their movement would have this sort of natural state to it, [but] the synthetic-ness would call your attention to something seemingly out of place.”For the installation, Geros worked with Cambridge Landscape Co. on the fabrication of the nine different “scapes.” Her colleagues at the design collective SHO, GSD alumni Gregory Thomas Spaw and Lee-Su Huang, along with interactive design specialist Jake Marsico, helped her fine-tune the computer elements and the lighting. When it was complete, “the interactivity of it became everything we could imagine it to be,” she said.It also became a way to engage people with art in a different way.Some of the best public art makes “a statement about your interaction within that space or that place’s connection to a larger environment,” Geros said.Working in the natural environment brought a unique set of challenges. The no-mow grass was supposed to reach between four and eight inches, but Geros quickly noticed some patches weren’t getting anywhere near that long. The reason? “Hungry bunnies,” she said of the rabbits that make the garden lawn their regular twilight meal. “They are mowing the grass.”As the seasons turn, weather will become an important factor. Geros tested a few acrylic rods last winter and they held up to February’s frigid temperatures. She also planted a few rods near the GSD campus to check their durability under the weight of the snow. They didn’t bend, but she remains realistic about the primacy of New England winters. A repeat of last year’s would temporarily put her work out of sight.“Fingers crossed,” she said, “I really hope we don’t have a serious winter.”Latent (e)Scapes Geros: “I had this idea that if those grasses were of a synthetic material but within a naturalistic environment to some degree … their movement would have this sort of natural state to it, [but] the synthetic-ness would call your attention to something seemingly out of place.” Photo by Kevin Grady Inspiration struck Geros during January break in 2013. On a drive from the East Coast to Kansas, she was taken with the waving dune grasses along the New England shore and their icy inland counterparts — “a family of tall grasses frozen in time” that blanketed much of the Midwest state. Photo by Kevin Grady Growing up in east Tennessee, Christina Leigh Geros reveled in the natural fireworks exploding nightly in her yard.“When I think about summer or even spring and fall, I think about lightning bugs, because our lawns would just be covered in these glittering lights. To me, that’s an evening outdoor space,” said the Harvard Graduate School of Design grad, whose next stop is Indonesia for a year of digital storytelling on a Fulbright-National Geographic Fellowship.What she’ll leave behind at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study tells a physical story of nature, movement, space, and especially light. Those vivid firefly memories inspired a particularly brilliant feature in Geros’ installation at the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Garden. Unveiled in May as the winner of Radcliffe’s biennial public art competition, “Latent (e)Scapes” consists of 1,600, 1/8-inch acrylic rods that glow.In the daytime the translucent bars — planted in nine berms of long Pennsylvania sedge and a no-mow fescue mix — resemble long, sprouting extensions of the surrounding yellow-green grass. At night, LEDs embedded in the tubes transform the garden into a glowing landscape sensitive to its surroundings.The rods are connected to sensors that relay information to an intricate system of computers that regulate the light. They change color, shifting from solid white to red and orange, and fluctuating in intensity in response to motion from passersby. Soon, another computer connection will enable the rods to react to natural forces such as heat, wind, and humidity.The competition, which began in 2013, offers degree students from across the University, regardless of concentration, the chance to submit a design for the garden space in Radcliffe Yard. At night, embedded LEDs transform the garden into a glowing landscape sensitive to its surroundings. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6aXqgu8NOI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/k6aXqgu8NOI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

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MP takes the Golf Express route to fundraising

first_img30 Jun 2016 MP takes the Golf Express route to fundraising England Golf is backing an MP’s fundraising golf challenge which draws attention to Golf Express, the campaign to promote 9-hole golf to busy people.Andrew Bingham, the Conservative MP for the High Peak, will play 9 holes at each of seven courses in his constituency to raise money for four local Mountain Rescue teams.The challenge starts at 4.30am tomorrow morning at Glossop & District Golf Club before moving on to Sickleholme, Hope, Buxton & High Peak, Cavendish, New Mills and finally Chapel-en-le-Frith.England Golf Chief Executive Nick Pink will join Andrew at Cavendish and commented: “This challenge supports an excellent cause and also highlights Golf Express. The 9-hole game really is the perfect option for people who are short of time but want to keep playing.”Andrew added: “I’m grateful to England Golf for their support, 9-hole golf is ideal for someone like myself who has a busy work schedule – 9 holes allows me to play all the game in half the time.”Golf Express is a national England Golf campaign to promote 9-hole golf. On average, a 9-hole round can be played in just two hours, which can fit into a busy lifestyle, and it offers all the health and social benefits of the full game. In a 9-hole round a player will walk two to three miles, take over 5000 steps and burn over 450 calories.The Golf Express website offers places to play across the country through its online directory and also features special offers.Andrew Bingham’s Golf Challenge is the latest in his series of annual fund-raising activities for local charities. It is sponsored by Nestlé Waters and has attracted local and national supporters, including the PGA and PING Europe.Donations can also be made at Andrew’s JustGiving page, www.justgiving.com/AndrewBinghamGolflast_img read more

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