Comment on Agency recruitment is not dying. It’s growing! by Steve Sykora

first_img Very much looking forward to that blog Greg!! Couldn’t agree more!Read full article Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Comment on Agency recruitment is not dying. It’s growing! by Steve SykoraShared from missc on 14 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img

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Campaign group to challenge government power over LGPS investments

first_imgA campaign group has successfully challenged a UK court ruling that would have restricted local authority pension funds’ ability to divest from companies on ethical grounds.The UK’s Supreme Court this week granted the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC) permission to appeal against a decision from the Court of Appeal, which ruled last year that funds within the £274.6bn (€303.2bn) Local Government Pension Scheme (LGPS) could not make divestment decisions contrary to UK foreign policy.The PSC said a hearing on the case was likely in the second half of this year.Jamie Potter, partner at law firm Bindmans and solicitor for the PSC, said: “The potential ramifications of the Court of Appeal decision are significant and worthy of consideration by the highest court in the UK. The UK’s Supreme CourtAt the time, the then Cabinet Office minister Matthew Hancock said the ban would “help prevent damaging and counter-productive local foreign policies undermining our national security”.However, the PSC challenged the ban through a judicial review in 2017, claiming it was aimed at stopping funds from divesting from Israeli companies. The government has denied this is the case.In June 2017, the UK High Court ruled that government guidance on boycotts and divestments had been used “unlawfully”. The relevant section in the guidance was subsequently cut.In June 2018, the Court of Appeal overturned the High Court’s ruling, prompting lawyers to warn that it could open the door to greater influence from politicians on impact investing strategies and environmental, social and governance issues within the LGPS.The PSC has been campaigning for many years to persuade investors to cut from their portfolios companies with links to Israeli settlements in contested territories in the Middle East.Several European pension investors – including Norway’s Government Pension Fund Global and PGGM in the Netherlands – have divested from specific Israeli companies in recent years because of concerns about the treatment of Palestinians. “If the Court of Appeal decision is allowed to stand, it permits the executive carte blanche to impose their own political perspective on the investment of citizens’ money. However, if PSC is successful in its appeal, the government will not be able to interfere in the ethical investment decisions of LGPS [funds] and their members.”The case dates back to 2016 when the UK government moved to ban public sector schemes from divesting from certain industries or countries through so-called “town hall” procurement boycotts.last_img read more

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Campaign warns fans over flares

first_imgA new campaign is being launched to warn of the dangers of fans using flares and smoke bombs after it was revealed children as young as eight have been used as ‘mules’ to smuggle pyrotechnic devices into football grounds. “This campaign clearly sets out the dangers of flares and smoke bombs. I want to see the courts taking this problem seriously and dealing in the strongest way possible with fans who still illegally smuggle pyrotechnics into football grounds.” Nine people have been injured or burned by fireworks thrown at grounds in England in the last 18 months. Last month a Manchester United fan who set off a smoke bomb during Sir Alex Ferguson’s last game in charge, against West Brom, was given a suspended two-month jail term and banned from any football grounds for three years. In February, two Chelsea fans were jailed for 28 days and given six-year football banning orders for taking smoke bombs into the Liberty Stadium for a match versus Swansea. Fans will be reminded that fireworks are illegal at matches, carrying the risk of possible jail sentences, and warned of the dangers – last season a 15-year-old boy suffered lung damage from a smoke bomb thrown at Wigan, while in February a 14-year-old boy was killed by a flare thrown by fans during a South American Libertadores Cup match in Bolivia. The Premier League said in a statement: “A disturbing element of increased pyrotechnics has been the involvement of children. “It is not uncommon for ‘mules’ to bring the pyrotechnics into a ground on behalf of others, and in one incident at a Premier League match last season a child aged around eight was observed aiding those involved in pyrotechnic use. “The child came into the ground with pyrotechnics in his rucksack and was then seen passing them to members of an adult group who let them off inside the ground.” New research has found that one third of fans have been affected by pyrotechnics, 87 per cent believe they are dangerous and 78 per cent say they want more action taken against users. Fireworks have always been viewed as a European phenomenon but they have become a growing problem in English football with eight incidents in the 2010/11 season, 72 in 2011/12 and so far this season 96 incidents. Policing minister Damian Green said: “Football fans might see images of football grounds in other parts of Europe full of smoke and light caused by pyrotechnic devices and think that they create a good atmosphere – but they do not. “Flares are very dangerous and can cause severe injuries. We are very lucky that no one has been seriously injured or killed by a flare here for a long time. The campaign by the Premier League, Football League and the FA comes after a growth in the number of incidents – including a linesman being struck by a firework at Aston Villa in October. Concerns have intensified after CCTV at one Premier League ground caught a young boy handing out fireworks to adults from his rucksack. Press Associationlast_img read more

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