GAA: MIXED FORTUNES FOR MINORS AS HURLERS WIN BUT FOOTBALLERS LOSE

first_imgTHERE were mixed fortunes for Donegal’s stars of the future against Monaghan today.The county’s Minor hurlers completed a great victory – but the county’s Minor footballers lost out by a single goal in the Minor League final.In the Minor football, Donegal went in at the break just a point behind – 0-06 to 0-05. But a second half goal from Monaghan’s Adam Traynor at Brewster Park would, in the end, prove the difference – Donegal losing 1-10 to 0-10.The Minor Hurlers meanwhile saw off Monaghan by 2-08 to 0-05 yesterday. GAA: MIXED FORTUNES FOR MINORS AS HURLERS WIN BUT FOOTBALLERS LOSE was last modified: April 27th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GAA: MIXED FORTUNES FOR MINORS AS HURLERS WIN BUT FOOTBALLERS LOSElast_img read more

See More

Warriors’ Draymond Green sees “double standard” in NBA’s punishments for Lakers-Rockets scuffles

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile device “It seems like a little bit of a … DENVER – The Lakers-Rockets scuffle on Saturday entertained Warriors forward Draymond Green so much that he pushed back his bedtime for another 75 minutes. Green expressed annoyance, though, that the NBA handed suspensions to Lakers forward Brandon Ingram (four), Lakers guard Rajon Rondo (three) and Rockets guard Chris Paul (two) in relation to his own punishments.last_img

See More

‘His love for the game’: An oral history of Joe Thornton’s crazy comeback gantlet

first_imgSAN JOSE — The inevitable is now official: Joe Thornton is the Sharks nominee for the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy.At this point, the story is almost deserving of its own feature film: a future Hall of Famer suffers two major-knee injuries in a 10-month span, fights his way back onto the ice at age 39 and plays a key role in a contender’s run to the playoffs. The only missing piece is a Hollywood finish with the Stanley Cup being hoisted at SAP Center in June.In short, Thornton is a walking …last_img

See More

Proteas begin life without Jacques Kallis

first_img30 January 2014 South Africa’s cricket selectors on Wednesday named all-rounders Wayne Parnell and Ryan Mclaren in a 15-man squad for the forthcoming three-test series against Australia, which begins at SuperSport Park in Centurion outside Pretoria on 12 February. With the great Jacques Kallis having retired from test cricket, the biggest question surrounding the Proteas’ line-up has been about how to replace him. While doing that properly is, frankly, impossible, the selectors did the expected by naming Mclaren and Parnell in the line-up.Limited test experience Parnell has previously played in three tests, while McLaren has appeared in just one match, ironically with Parnell in January 2010 at The Wanderers where Dale Steyn and Morne Morkel spearheaded South Africa to victory by an innings and 74 runs over England. McLaren boasts a superior first class record to Parnell, averaging 30.63 with the bat to Parnell’s 22.34 and 25.47 with the ball to Parnell’s 32.94. However, McLaren, at just shy of 31 years of age, is over seven years older than his fellow all-rounder. What those figures reveal very clearly is that neither man will be able to come any near to emulating Kallis with the bat. However, they may be able to match him with the ball. Three other players in the squad are in a similar class of all-rounder, with off-spinner and left-handed batsman JP Duminy offering more with the bat than the others. Robin Peterson brings the option of left-arm spin and a left-handed batsman, while Vernon Philander, the world’s number one ranked test bowler, has shown on a number of occasions that he is more than useful with a bat in his hands. ‘We’re not looking for another Jacques Kallis’ In an interview with ESPN Cricinfo’s Firdose Moonda, Proteas’ coach Russell Domingo explained: “The mental shift is going to be just as important as the statistical shift. We’re not looking for another Jacques Kallis. We’re looking for someone to step up to the plate.” Underlining the hole that Kallis has left, he added: “It’s not going to be a set strategy like we had in the past. Something’s got to give. Either we will have four seamers, no spinner or only six batters.” ‘We want to stay constant’ “We want to stay constant to the brand of cricket we have played over the last few years that has brought us such success,” Cricket South Africa selection convener Andrew Hudson said in a statement. “I believe that this squad covers all possible options we may wish to exercise, as well as the conditions we are likely to encounter.” With an eye to the future, Hudson added: “Two other players, Beuran Hendricks and Simon Harmer, will be joining the squad to assist with the preparation leading into the first test match. “They are both highly talented cricketers who will benefit from being introduced to the Proteas environment. They also possess individual skills that will assist the team with their preparation for the Australian attack we are likely to face.”SOUTH AFRICA TEST SQUAD Graeme Smith (Nashua Mobile Cape Cobras, capt), Hashim Amla (Nashua Mobile Cape Cobras), AB de Villiers (Nashua Titans), JP Duminy (Nashua Mobile Cape Cobras), Faf du Plessis (Nashua Titans), Dean Elgar (Chevrolet Knights), Rory Kleinveldt (Nashua Mobile Cape Cobras), Ryan McLaren (Chevrolet Knights), Morne Morkel (Nashua Titans), Wayne Parnell (Chevrolet Warriors), Alviro Petersen (bizhub Highveld Lions), Robbie Peterson (Nashua Mobile Cape Cobras), Vernon Philander (Nashua Mobile Cape Cobras), Dale Steyn (Nashua Mobile Cape Cobras), Thami Tsolekile (bizhub Highveld Lions)last_img read more

See More

The Problem With Skin Flakes in Your Air Conditioner

first_imgI never read Robert Fulghum’s book, All I Ever Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, but I have a clear memory of learning about one thing in the book:  Most of the dust floating around our homes is actually made up of skin flakes.  Now, I don’t know if that memory is accurate (maybe it wasn’t from Fulghum’s book?), but I have found out that this tantalizing “fact” about dust and skin flakes isn’t true.  Household dust, it turns out, isn’t made up largely of skin flakes.  (See this article about a 2009 study on household dust.)Household dust and air conditioner coilsThat doesn’t really let skin flakes off the hook, though.  There’s still enough of them floating around that they can cause a problem if they find their way into your air conditioner. RELATED ARTICLESAll About Indoor Air QualityAll About Air PurifiersVentilation Rates and Human HealthHVAC technicians deal with dirty coils all the time.  See that photo at the top?  That’s a really bad one.  Almost no air can get through all that gunk.  I did a kind of postmortem on that coil a few years ago, but my focus was on the performance of the air conditioner, not indoor air quality.Just so you know what an air conditioner’s evaporator coil is supposed to look like, here’s a photo of a nice, clean coil.  No gunk.  No sludge.  Just a bit of water that had condensed on the cold metal fins on that summer day in Atlanta.  Air can move through the coil.A clean air conditioner coil with no skin flakes. [Photo credit: Energy Vanguard]Now look again at the photo at the top of this article.  When dirt gets pulled into the duct system and can make it all the way to the coil, that’s what can happen over time.  It’s a mix of all kinds of things.  A lot of it is particles (pollen, dirt, dead bug parts…) that find their way into the house from outdoors.  Another big chunk is carpet fibers in homes with carpet.  Then there’s pet dander.  And skin flakes.When that stuff gets pulled into an air conditioner and finds a wet coil, it sticks.  Over time, that gunk creates its own little ecosystem because guess what:  There’s life in them there particles!  My friend Kristof Irwin has discussed this issue of the microbiome in his Building Science Podcast more than once.  (And that’s only one reason you should go listen and subscribe!)The problem with skin flakesAt the end of 2017, researchers in Hong Kong published a paper titled, Skin squames contribute to ammonia and volatile fatty acid production from bacteria colonizing in air‐cooling units with odor complaints.  Squames are what I’ve been calling flakes; they’re pieces of skin that fall off our bodies all the time.  The plain English translation of the title would be:  Skin Flakes and bacteria combine in your air conditioner to create bad odors.  (Here’s a nice summary of the paper.)Skin flakes have proteins in them.  Bacteria, which are everywhere, chow down on the proteins.  An eventual waste product from this process is ammonia.  So if you ever smell something like urine coming from the air conditioner, this could be the reason.But wait… there’s more!  In addition to the proteins, skin flakes also have fatty acids.  That leads to another bacteria chow-down with a different waste product smell:  body odor.What can you do to keep these urine and BO smells from emanating from your air conditioner?  It’s pretty easy.  Make sure your return ducts are sealed and that you have a good filter with no bypass.  Just a few months ago I wrote about seven reasons your filter isn’t doing its job.  Fix those problems and use a good, high-MERV filter designed properly to have a low pressure drop. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

See More

Understanding Zoom Lenses and How to Use Them Properly

first_imgBefore you go overboard with the zoom on your next shoot, learn how the lens works — and how to use it properly.Cover image via Shutterstock.Whether you’ve been guilty of this yourself or have seen others struggle, zoom-happy filmmaking can ruin a shoot and annoy audiences. That’s not to say zooming in and out is a bad thing; in fact, it’s actually a marvel of lens technology that we can zoom at all. And when you use it  intelligently, it can be quite effective.However, it is still easy to take the zoom for granted — especially now that filmmakers have handy stock lenses for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras that offer great flexibility and range to zoom easily and often. Let’s explore how zoom lenses work and some best practices to help you use them effectively, intelligently, and properly.How Zoom Lenses Work Image via Wikimedia.According to a good Wikipedia definition, “a zoom lens is a mechanical assembly of lens elements for which the focal length (and thus angle of view) can be varied, as opposed to a fixed focal length (FFL) lens (see prime lens).”That sounds pretty straightforward, but let’s dive into how the mechanisms work to change the focal length and your angle of view.As you can see in the gif above, a simplified zoom lens works by combining two parts: a focusing lens similar to your standard prime or fixed lenses and an afocal zoom system, which is the sliding element that does not focus on light. Rather,  it focuses on altering (thus magnifying) the size of the light. What’s important is that, while the zoom comes from this sliding lens, it is necessary to compensate for any movement of the focal plane to keep the focused image sharp — which means either you have to physically move the camera or move the focal plane to compensate.Because of this compensation, and in spite of how much flexibility a zoom offers, there are several factors you need to be aware of: noise, pincushioning, slower shutter response time, and a greater need for stability. Here’s a great video by Canon that provides more in-depth information — not just about zoom lenses but also how lenses work in general.How to Zoom Properly and SmoothlyImage via Peta Pixel.For filmmaking, it’s important to not only understand how your zoom works but also what zooming is meant to do for your audience. Zooms can be quite abrasive at times, which can be a stylistic decision, but it’s often an unwanted consequence.On many professional production shoots, zooming is intentional, and it relies on a focus puller to compensate — or with exact measurements in mind. On small DIY productions, you can purchase (or make) different devices to help smooth a zoom. Here are a few resources and tricks.The Death and Rebirth of the ZoomHow to get smooth camera movements using a rubber bandPrimes vs. Zooms: Situational EF Lens PrepVideography 101: Excellent Zooming TipsI’d be remiss not to mention that you can add many zoom effects in post-production as well. Here are some resources to consider for creating digital and stylized zoom effects.Smooth Zoom Video Effect Tutorial | Adobe Premiere ProHow to Create a 3D Parallax Zoom in Premiere ProGet to Know The Dynamic Zoom Tool In Resolve 14Create a Map Zoom Effect in FCPXKnow When to Zoom (and When Not To)Image via Shutterstock.Once you feel you’ve mastered the art of zooming, it’s time for you to decide when you actually want to use a proper zoom. Like Stanley Kubrick so aptly demonstrates in his classic Barry Lyndon, zooms can create quite a cinematic effect when used slowly and artistically. It is important, however, to note that the heyday of zoom technology in filmmaking was in the ’60s and ’70s. As such, in the case of self-aware filmmakers like Quinten Tarantino, a heavy-handed crash zoom in itself can be a retro-filmmaking technique.On the other hand, zooms have grown less popular in pure cinema settings. Instead, they have found a home in reality television, where they portray real life and home-video quality. You don’t have to look long or hard to find many essays on why you shouldn’t use zooms (or even many arguing more for dolly shots over zooms).At the end of the day, a zoom is a practical and stylistic option for your production, but it’s not a perfect tool for every situation. Pick your spots, focus on your intentions, and use your tools and resources wisely for optimal results.Looking for more information on zooms? Check out these resources.How to Create a Dolly Zoom With Just a Prime LensPrimes vs. Zooms — Situational EF Lens PrepThe Death and Rebirth of the ZoomVideo Editing: Snap Zooms Should Never Be a Snap Decisionlast_img read more

See More