Acting State Health Commissioner approves $12.2 million Medowlands Hospital sale

first_imgSECAUCUS — Acting State Health Commissioner Christopher Rinn has approved the sale of Meadowlands Hospital to Long Island developer Yan Moshe, according to a letter sent to the hospital’s acting CFO Friday.In his letter, Rinn says he “evaluated” Moshe’s application and believes it is consistent with state standards.Rinn’s approval clears the final hurdle for transferring hospital ownership from MHA, LLC to NJMHMC. Moshe is principal owner of NJMHMC. Moshe said he plans on keeping the same number of services the hospital has currently, and improving on them in the future.Rinn also said in the letter that Moshe’s application “expresses its commitment to the continuity of services in Hudson County.” He noted that at a November meeting with the state health planning board, Moshe said that “the hospital has been a greatly underutilized asset and there’s much more that can be done to enable it to achieve its full potential.” At that same meeting, according to Rinn’s letter, Secaucus Town Administrator Gary Jeffas, on the town’s behalf, spoke positively of the application to purchase the hospital.At a public hearing regarding the sale in October, 12 of 13 people who spoke favored the application, helping sway Rinn’s decision, according to the letter.According to Rinn’s letter, Moshe will put up $5 million for the hospital’s $12.2 million purchase price. The remaining $7.2 million will come via loan.last_img read more

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Cloud Strategy and the Role of IT in a Multi-Cloud World

first_imgWho’s driving the cloud strategy in your organization? Recently we had a team of cloud experts join Dell technologists including myself (@NickBrackney) for our #CloudTweetChat. Having a chance to interact with and learn from so many knowledgeable folks with varied backgrounds and approaches is critical for our team as well as our customers. What makes these chats great is we go beyond the buzz words and marketing fluff that permeates the discussion and get right into strategies and implementation. As we prepare for our next CloudTweetChat on March 12th it seemed like a good time to reflect on what we learned in our last conversation.According to CIO.com, the average organization is running applications in at least 4.8 different cloud services, both public and private. It’s a complex landscape (cloudscape).Experts in attendance included:Tim Crawford, CIO Strategic Advisor, AVOA, (@tcrawford)Keith Townsend, Co-Founder, The CTO Advisor (@CTOAdvisor)Eric Kavanagh, Bloor Group CEO, Tech Evangelist, and Media Innovator (@eric_kavanagh)Adam Post, Principal Consultant, IT Partners (@semi_technical)Ned Bellavance, Founder, Ned in the Cloud, LLC (@Ned1313)Bob Ganley, Senior Marketing Consultant, Dell EMC (@ganleybob)Josh Fidel, Principal Solutions Architect, Rolta|Advizex (@jcefidel)Brian Solis, International Keynote Speaker, Thought Leader and Analyst, (@briansolis)Arjan Timmerman, Co-owner and Analyst, TECHunplugged, (@Arjantim)Matt Baker, SVP of Strategy and Planning, Dell EMC (@mattwbaker)Phil Bradham, Azure Stack Applications Architect, Dell EMC, (@PBradz)Who’s driving the cloud strategy?To better understand the role of IT, we need to understand if there is a centralized cloud strategy and who is driving it. I believe that strategy should be coming out of the CIOs office. It could also be a combined effort with the CTO, IT operations, security and developers forming a cross-functional team.Keith Townsend countered that most companies don’t have a CTO, and functionally, enterprise architects fulfill that role. He believes enterprise architecture should be driving cloud strategy. “CIO’s should leave the “how” to lieutenants. They should hire people to make those functional decisions and sign off as a sanity check.”Tim Crawford added that, “the CIO should be the one taking point on the cloud strategy. However, likely others within their org will be more engaged on the execution.” Tim reminds us, “Technology is a team sport. But, not everyone plays the same roles or speaks the same language.” Phil Bradham concurs that input from multiple disciplines should be in the plan.Josh Fidel breaks down ownership this way:Executives (CxO/VP) should set high level strategy based on desired outcomes.Management (Director/Manager) should define use cases to achieve those outcomes.Architects should help choose which cloud technologies and providers meet those use cases.Engineers should train for the chosen technology.Rob Steel also agreed that multiple business leaders should be involved in the process, in order to assure each department’s requirements are met.The benefits of a centralized cloud strategyFrom my perspective, it’s easy to see the benefits of centralizing your cloud strategy. It should help deliver better security postures, accelerate innovation, and improve service levels. You’ll likely see cost savings, too.Adam Post weighed in, “one of the primary downsides of a fragmented cloud strategy is the additional complexity required to both architect and maintain applications across platforms. Having a centralized strategy goes a long way toward addressing this.”Any fragmentation works against efficiency and drives down value, and cloud strategy is no different, as Tim Crawford observed. Matt Baker agreed that a fragmented strategy breeds complexity, drives up costs and slows down the organization.The struggles with creating a consistent cloud strategyGetting the entire organization to support a cloud strategy is key, Phil noted. Saying it’s important to share a clear explanation of the plan in business terms.“A barrier to consistency is commonly the difference in underlying platforms and the methods of interfacing with them. Some tools attempt to abstract away the differences, leaving a lowest common denominator of features. A common underlying platform avoids this,” says Adam.Ken said that he believes multi-cloud in the context of a single application is a myth, or possibly a trap. But Tim countered that most enterprises are using multi-cloud quite successfully.Shadow IT and internal delays were at the top of Josh’s list of challenges. Others chimed in about the struggles with other departments deploying applications without IT. But, Tim observed that transformative CIOs can find value in shadow IT.The Lift and Shift ControversyThe conversation shifted when I commented that I think lift and shift can still offer value, but absolutely agree that loud native and using HCI and API driven architectures on-premises is helping IT to deliver IaaS capabilities everywhere.This kicked off a spirited debate between our participants. Tim disagreed: He considers lift and shift only useful in specific use-cases with a very defined time frame. He doesn’t recommend making it a core strategy. But  Keith noted that this has been the historical use case for cloud.As a result of these approaches, Phil observed that companies are moving back to on prem to save money, and that the cost to run old architecture on the cloud was too expensive for many.Matt also added fuel to the fire with a controversial statement, “cloud is ALWAYS more expensive because renting assets is ALWAYS more expensive…However, that doesn’t mean Public Cloud isn’t critical and important.”I think where we landed on is cloud not done properly can limit the benefits of this model, and the idea cloud saves money is largely inaccurate. Mike says the cost narrative is only true if you treat cloud as a data center. This brings us back to the key strategy points:What do you need to run where?What are the economics for your organization?How can technology partners make it easier for IT to drive innovation with cloud?My thoughts were that technology partners must embrace openness and support customers on whichever cloud they need/want to run on. The idea of a single source for IT just doesn’t work in the as-a-service economy, because no one vendor has all the answers.Arjan Timmerman advised technology partners to “listen to the customer and sell them the product(s) they need, not what has the biggest profit.”Adam agreed, stating “partners should take the opportunity to help customers re-evaluate their requirements and be open to a change in approach, where it makes sense.”Tim echoed the other sentiments in the group: “Technology partners need to clearly understand their customer’s business objectives, challenges and current state,” he says.“We now need (trusted technology vendors) to help tell us how to solve business challenges. Public cloud enables businesses to do tech, vendors should enable IT to do business,” Keith concluded.Bonus RoundFor the bonus round, we asked: In organizations where developers or lines of business (LoB) units have led the charge, how can IT regain control? Eric Kavanagh suggests launching a Kubernetes instance and having an IT director take the lead.Josh Fidel sums up a winning strategy:Stop playing politics.Have conversations.Understand business needs from the views of the stakeholders.Work TOGETHER to find solutions.Consider the importance of what is already in place, and don’t try and move mountains overnight. Instead, build a sustainable cloud strategy that is staged to avoid undue risk or halting innovation.Make sure you join the 3/12 Cloud Native #CloudTweetChatDo you have a favorite cloud discussion topic? You can join the conversation anytime using #CloudTweetChat and tagging @DellTechCloud.Mark your calendar for the next #CloudTweetChat on 3/12 . Our topic is: Kubernetes and Cloud Native.You can follow @DellTechCloud for insights anytime for always-on insights and discussions on cloud.last_img read more

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‘His love for the game’: An oral history of Joe Thornton’s crazy comeback gantlet

first_imgSAN JOSE — The inevitable is now official: Joe Thornton is the Sharks nominee for the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy.At this point, the story is almost deserving of its own feature film: a future Hall of Famer suffers two major-knee injuries in a 10-month span, fights his way back onto the ice at age 39 and plays a key role in a contender’s run to the playoffs. The only missing piece is a Hollywood finish with the Stanley Cup being hoisted at SAP Center in June.In short, Thornton is a walking …last_img

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Hand or foot spasms

first_imgDefinitionSpasms are contractions of the muscles of the hands, thumbs, feet, or toes. Spasms are usually brief, but they can be severe and painful.Alternative NamesFoot spasms; Carpopedal spasm; Spasms of the hands or feet; Hand spasmConsiderationsSymptoms depend on the cause. They may include:CrampingFatigueMuscle weaknessNumbness, tingling, or a “pins and needles” feelingTwitchingUncontrolled, purposeless, rapid motionsNighttime leg cramps are common in the elderly.CausesCramps or spasms in the muscles often have no clear cause.Possible causes of hand or foot spasms include: Abnormal levels of electrolytes or minerals in the body Brain disorders, such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, dystonia, and Huntington disease Chronic kidney disease and dialysis Damage to a single nerve or nerve group (mononeuropathy) or multiple nerves (polyneuropathy) that are connected to muscles Dehydration (not having enough fluids in your body)Hyperventilation (overbreathing), which is rapid or deep breathing that can occur with anxiety or panicMuscle cramps, usually caused by overuse during sports or work activityPregnancy, more often during the third trimesterThyroid disordersToo little vitamin DUse of certain medicationsHome CareIf vitamin D deficiency is the cause, supplemental vitamin D should be taken under the doctors direction. Calcium supplements may also help.Being active helps keep muscles loose. Aerobic exercise, especially swimming, and strength building exercises are helpful. But care must be taken not to overdo activity, which can worsen the spasms.Drinking plenty of fluids during exercise is also important.When to Contact a Medical ProfessionalIf you notice recurrent spasms of your hands or feet, call your health care provider.advertisementWhat to Expect at Your Office VisitThe doctor or nurse will perform a physical exam and ask about your medical history and symptoms.Blood and urine tests may be done. Tests may include:Potassium, calcium and magnesium levelsHormone levelsKidney function testsVitamin D levels (25-OH vitamin D)Treatment depends on the cause of the spasms. For example, if they are due to a low level of vitamin D in your body, your doctor will likely recommend that you take a vitamin D supplement.ReferencesStein J. Spasticity. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 144.Review Date:2/24/2014Reviewed By:Joseph V. Campellone, M.D., Division of Neurology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more

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15 days agoSouthampton manager Hasenhuttl loses another backroom staff member

first_imgSouthampton manager Hasenhuttl loses another backroom staff memberby Freddie Taylor15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveSouthampton manager Ralph Hasenhuttl has lost another member of his backroom staff.Hasenhuttl lost number two Danny Rohl to Bayern Munich two months ago.And now the club’s head of performance analysis Natasha Patel has joined New York Red Bulls.A statement on the Saints’ website reads: “Patel will oversee and expand the club’s use of analytics in areas including opponent scouting, game preparation and player evaluations from the Red Bulls First Team down through Red Bulls Academy.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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Kentucky’s Willie Cauley-Stein On Arkansas, “We Don’t Like That Team”

first_imgWillie Cauley Stein warms up for Kentucky.Prior to Sunday’s SEC Tournament championship game, Arkansas’ players did some trash talking to their opponent, Kentucky. They reportedly got in the Wildcats’ faces in a Bridgestone Arena tunnel and Razorbacks’ forward Bobby Portis said being able to play UK was like getting a wish granted. The fervor Arkansas’ players have for Kentucky is a feeling that is apparently replicated by the Wildcats’ players. Following his team’s victory against the Razorbacks, Kentucky junior center Willie Cauley-Stein said “we don’t like that team,” referencing Arkansas. Wow. Willie keeping it REAL. “We don’t like that team.” Said winning title was one thing, but they just wanted to beat “that team.”— Ashley Scoby (@AshleyScoby) March 15, 2015Willie Cauley-Stein after the game re: Arkansas, “Straight up, we don’t like that team.”— Brett Dawson (@BDawsonRivals) March 15, 2015Full WCS quote on not liking “that team” pic.twitter.com/EoGtkE2VTJ— Ashley Scoby (@AshleyScoby) March 15, 2015It’s not often that you see college basketball players openly discussing their dislike for another team, but we love it. Kentucky and Arkansas will learn their place in the NCAA Tournament at 6 p.m. E.T. on CBS.last_img read more

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As Franklins lure brings people north Gjoa Haven seeks its share of

first_imgGJOA HAVEN, Nunavut – It’s cool and cloudy as Don Sessions, wearing a toque and a good, solid jacket, hops off an inflatable boat that has ferried him from his cruise ship to shore.The welcoming facilities in Gjoa Haven, Nunavut, are primitive — a stretch of pebbly beach marked off with yellow police tape. Sessions and his fellow tourists will walk up a dusty dirt trail into town to stroll its dusty dirt roads.He’s having a ball.“I’m loving the trip,” says Sessions, a self-described Franklin Expedition nut who has travelled from St. Louis to visit the Arctic hamlet near the site of Sir John Franklin’s shipwrecks. “When you were a kid, this is what you dreamed about, if you dreamed about the North.”That’s music to Bob Cheetham’s ears.“It’s going to be huge,” says Cheetham, Gjoa Haven’s economic development officer. “There’s a lot of interest on the cruise ships now.”Sessions’ ship, the 166-passenger French-flagged Le Boreal, is one of six that will stop in Gjoa Haven during this year’s six-week season — two more ships than last year.Adventurous sailors are also coming. Gjoa (pronounced “Joe”) Haven’s pretty little bay had four yachts moored there at one point in August.“They’re buying groceries. They’re buying supplies. They’re buying fuel. They’re visiting our heritage facility here where a lot of the carvers have their stuff on exhibit and for sale,” Cheetham says.Franklin’s ships Erebus and Terror set out from England in 1845 with 129 men to search for the Northwest Passage, but they never returned.Gjoa is uniquely placed to take advantage of the discovery of the ships. It’s the closest community to where both the Erebus and the Terror finally went down.It’s an economic opportunity in a place that doesn’t have many of them and the community is making big plans to capitalize.The first-ever Umiyaqtutt (Inuktitut for “Shipwreck”) Festival — two weeks of dancing, community feasts and lectures from Parks Canada and Inuit experts — began Sept. 2.Then there’s an expansion of the local Nattilik Heritage Centre to include Franklin displays, expected to take a large share of the nearly $17 million budgeted by Ottawa in 2016 for conservation, research and presentation of the artifacts.Cheetham says new facilities for Gjoa’s highly regarded carvers and even tours to the Erebus site are also in the works.“It’s huge relative to what we had in the past, and it’s growing.”As well as Franklin, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen moored his ship here in 1903 and stayed for nearly two years. His ship was named the Gjoa.“You have the two British ships that didn’t survive and then you have Amundsen who made it through the Northwest Passage and into the Antarctic,” says Cheetham. “He did survive because he learned how to live with the people here — learned all the skills, all the clothing, how to stay alive.”It’s not hard to find people with fond family memories of Amundsen in Gjoa Haven.“We pass those stories on from generation to generation,” says Jimmy Arqviq, whose great-grandfather knew Amundsen.Cruise tourists are met by a local guide who shepherds them through a tightly scheduled program of local art, performances and traditional food. The tour costs $50 a head, which goes to pay guides and performers.Cheetham says figures on how much tourists spend while in the community are being developed.“Average spending has been low in the past off the cruise ships. But a lot of that’s about how we haven’t had the promotional stuff on the cruise ships in advance to prepare them for what they might be able to purchase here, and that’s changing.”The community is adding infrastructure such as ATM machines to make it easier for visitors to part with their money. Other communities report the average tourist leaves behind $90 on a shore visit.Gjoa Haven is remote and expensive to visit. It offers little in the way of amenities — restaurants, for example. But because it’s so small, even a little economic activity can go a long way.“Baby steps here,” says Cheetham. “We’re in the early stages of marketing and promotion.”But just as explorers charted the Northwest Passage little by little, Cheetham says their stories are slowly building an economy in the community at the heart of their adventures.“One thing builds on another.”last_img read more

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Resource firm planning new NB wells if Tories lift fracking moratorium

first_imgFREDERICTON — A major player in natural gas development in New Brunswick is making plans for new wells if the province’s new Tory government follows through on a pledge to lift a moratorium on fracking.Corridor Resources currently has 32 producing wells in the Sussex area and operates a 50 kilometre pipeline, a gathering system comprising 15 kilometres of pipe, and a natural gas processing facility.The company wants to expand but the previous Liberal government imposed a moratorium in 2014 that prohibits hydraulic fracturing — a process that involves pumping water and chemicals at high pressure to fracture shale rock and release gas.The new Tory government has proposed lifting the moratorium in specific areas, like the Sussex region, if there is public support.In a corporate presentation the company says, if the moratorium is lifted, they would drill five vertical evaluation wells, complete three existing wells, identify “sweet spots,” and drill a second round of up to five horizontal wells.The company says with the impending end of Nova Scotia’s offshore production, natural gas will have to come from outside the Maritimes if the New Brunswick deposit is not further developed.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Crews working to extinguish forest fire near the Site C Dam

first_imgThe smoke covering Fort St. John is coming from the fire that is currently uncontrolled.If the current fire suppression doesn’t work, more crews will be brought in to fight the fire Thursday.There is another fire northwest of Fort St. John, that is approximately 100 hectares in size.  The fire isn’t creating a lot of smoke today and crews are working to put out that fire.If you have any information about forest fires in our region, email [email protected]  You can also send along any pictures or video as well. UPDATE as of 5:45 p.m. – B.C. Hydro has confirmed the fire is located approximately 3.5km upstream from the Site C Dam project.  At this time there is no concern for the workers on site or the worker accommodation.  Hydro and the B.C. Wildfire Service are monitoring the situation and their first priority is the safety of workers on site and the public.  Hydro was burning waste wood debris on Friday and Saturday near Tea Island.  The cause of Wednesday’s fire is unknown at this time.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Crews from the Forest Fire Service and B.C. Hydro are working to contain a fire near the Site C Dam.The fire broke out on Wednesday and is approximately 4 hectares in size.  Crews from the Forest Service and B.C. Hydro are working to contain the fire and B.C. Hydro has hired a helicopter to help with the suppression efforts.last_img read more

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Northeast BC unemployment rate increased in January 2019

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The unemployment rate in Northeast B.C. saw an increase in January.The unemployment rate in January was 5.5 percent compared to 4.7 percent in December of 2018.January has been the highest recorded unemployment percentage since September 2018 at 5.6 percent, an estimated 39,900 people are employed in a labour force of 42,100. A recent statement made by Bruce Ralston, Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology, on the release of the January Labour Force Survey from Statistics Canada;“As demonstrated in the newest results, higher wages, low unemployment and good jobs in British Columbia show that people are at the centre of our strong and stable economy.Wages continued to rise in January, with B.C. among the top provinces for year-over-year growth. In the past year, B.C.’s average wages grew by 4.1%, the highest among provinces. In fact, 2018 was B.C.’s highest annual wage growth in the past 10 years.B.C.’s unemployment rate remained the lowest in Canada — for the 17th month in a row — at 4.7%. Private sector jobs have been fuelling employment growth in the province, with an increase of 64,800 in the past year.This means people continue to see the benefit of a high-performing economy following many years of wage stagnation.”B.C.’s economy is expected to outperform the rest of Canada over the next three years. The Economic Forecast Council, a group of bank economists and analysts that are independent of government, estimates that B.C.’s real gross domestic product is expected to grow by 2.6% in both 2019 and 2020. “We’re working hard to nurture a sustainable economy that works for people.”last_img read more

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