CW Business Earns Fortinet Platinum Partner Recognition

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 24 Feb 2016 – MIAMI, FL, February 22, 2016 – C&W Business, part of Cable & Wireless Communications, Plc (CWC), today announces it has been recognized as a Fortinet Platinum Partner. To receive Platinum status, C&W Business demonstrated that it had successfully achieved all Fortinet certification requirements and training programmes needed to deliver the highest levels of partnership, performance and commitment. As a certified Platinum partner, C&W Business are experts in delivering Fortinet’s superior, next generation multi-threat security solutions to their customers across the Caribbean and Latin American region. C&W Business has a proven track record of delivering managed security services over a vast range of advanced security technologies, such as Web Application Firewall, Email Security, DDOS protection, Advanced Persistent Threat protection, among others. C&W Business offers unparalleled skills in the region, with local resources across 26 countries and experts with the highest certification levels across the board. C&W Business has successfully deployed complex security solutions, using Fortinet’s technology, in large and medium companies from a number of different sectors –including Banking, Retail, Government and BPO.“This recognition as a Platinum Partner highlights our dedication to be the most complete ICT Solutions provider in the Caribbean and Latin American region. Security is a topic that is high in CIO’s minds and we take that very seriously,” said Daniel Peiretti, SVP Product Development, C&W Business. “We have focused in hiring and certifying security experts and giving them the tools necessary to ensure our customers enjoy peace of mind with their network”, added Peiretti. Security threats are on the rise so corporations and government agencies alike must do everything to protect their networks and their data. C&W Business employs security experts in their Security Operation Centers (SOC) throughout the region to monitor their network 24X7X365.“We are excited to recognize C&W Business as a Platinum Partner, based on their strong commitment to delivering innovative solutions that drive customer success,” said Pedro Paixao, General Manager, Latin America, at Fortinet. “C&W Business plays an important role in transforming customers, across multiple industries, into more agile, connected and secure companies that can rest assured their most important assets and the assets of their end-users are protected.” Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:cable & wireless communications, Platinum Partnerlast_img read more

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AL leaders themselves spill beans about convoy attack

first_img-Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) said on Wednesday Feni Awami League leader Azharul Haque spilled the beans on the attack on BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia’s motorcade, reports UNB.”The Feni district unit ruling party leader spilled the beans yesterday [Tuesday]. There’s now no doubt that Awami League MP Nizam Hazari is the mastermind of the incident. People also realised it earlier while now they [AL leaders] themselves are talking about it,” said BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi.Speaking at a press conference at BNP’s Naya Paltan central office, he also said,”It’s now proved that Nizam Hazari carried out the attack on the BNP chairperson’s convoy as part of a plan made by the government high-ups. It’s not possible to keep the cat in the bag for a long time… It’ll surely come out of the bag.”Earlier on Tuesday, Azharul Haque, a member of the ruling party’s Feni district unit, said their party MP Nizam Uddin Hazari was behind the attack on BNP chairperson’ Khaleda Zia’s Cox’s Bazar-bound convoy last month.”The recant attack on BNP chairperson’s convoy was planned one. The vehicles of DBC, Channel i, Ekattor and Boishakhi TV, Prothom Alo and The Daily Star were damaged after targeting those selectively. Nizam Hazari did it with his cadres to take revenge for filing news reports against him,” he told a press conference at the National Press Club.On 28 October, some unruly youths attacked BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia’s convoy near Mohammad Ali Bazar in Feni Sadar on her way to Cox’s Bazar to visit Rohingya camps.The attackers damaged a good number of vehicles, including microbuses of Channel i, DBC, Ekattor, and Baishakhi Television, and beat several newsmen and leaders and activists of BNP who were coming with Khaleda Zia to Cox’s Bazar.Referring to Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader’s comment blaming BNP for the attack, Rizvi said whether Quader would not be ashamed of following Azharul’s assertion about the incident. “How the other Awami League leaders who also tried to shift the blame on BNP will hide their face now?”He also alleged that Nizam Hazari turned Feni into a sanctuary of terrorism with his cadres.last_img read more

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See the Sun Do a Somersault Courtesy of NASAs Observatory

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory took a photo of the sun every 12 seconds on July 6th, and the results aren’t quite what you’d expect. A time-lapse video of the images makes it look like the sun is doing a somersault, because the SDO was spinning 360-degrees on one axis when it captured them. The observatory performs the seven-hour maneuver once a year to take an accurate measurement of the star’s edge. See, the solar surface is pretty chaotic, and the spacecraft has tough time finding its outermost layer while it’s stationary. SDO’s images were taken in extreme ultraviolet wavelength, but NASA colorized the sun in the video below, so we can see it tumbling in space. This story originally appeared on Engadget 1 min read Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global July 18, 2016last_img read more

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React Native development tools Expo React Native CLI CocoaPods Tutorial

first_imgThere are a large number of React Native development tools. Expo, React Native CLI, CocoaPods being the more popular ones. As with any development tools, there is going to be a trade-off between flexibility and ease of use. I encourage you start by using Expo for your React Native development workflow unless you’re sure you’ll need access to the native code. This article is taken from the book React Native Cookbook, Second Edition by Dan Ward.  In this book, you will improve your React Native mobile development skills or transition from web development to mobile development. In this article, we will learn about the various React Native development tools- Expo, React Native CLI, CocoaPods. We will also learn how to setup Expo and React Native CLI Expo This was taken from the expo.io site: “Expo is a free and open source toolchain built around React Native to help you build native iOS and Android projects using JavaScript and React.” Expo is becoming an ecosystem of its own, and is made up of five interconnected tools: Expo CLI: The command-line interface for Expo. We’ll be using the Expo CLI to create, build, and serve apps. A list of all the commands supported by the CLI can be found in the official documentation at the following link: https://docs.expo.io/versions/latest/workflow/expo-cli Expo developer tools: This is a browser-based tool that automatically runs whenever an Expo app is started from the Terminal via the expo start command. It provides active logs for your in-development app, and quick access to running the app locally and sharing the app with other developers. Expo Client: An app for Android and iOS. This app allows you to run your React Native project within the Expo app on the device, without the need for installing it. This allows developers to hot reload on a real device, or share development code with anyone else without the need for installing it. Expo Snack: Hosted at https://snack.expo.io, this web app allows you to work on a React Native app in the browser, with a live preview of the code you’re working on. If you’ve ever used CodePen or JSFiddle, Snack is the same concept applied to React Native applications. Expo SDK: This is the SDK that houses a wonderful collection of JavaScript APIs that provide Native functionality not found in the base React Native package, including working with the device’s accelerometer, camera, notifications, geolocation, and many others. This SDK comes baked in with every new project created with Expo. These tools together make up the Expo workflow. With the Expo CLI, you can create and build new applications with Expo SDK support baked in. The XDE/CLI also provides a simple way to serve your in-development app by automatically pushing your code to Amazon S3 and generating a URL for the project. From there, the CLI generates a QR code linked to the hosted code. Open the Expo Client app on your iPhone or Android device, scan the QR code, and BOOM there’s your app, equipped with live/hot reload! And since the app is hosted on Amazon S3, you can even share the in-development app with other developers in real time. React Native CLI The original bootstrapping method for creating a new React Native app using the command is as follows: react-native init This is provided by the React Native CLI. You’ll likely only be using this method of bootstrapping a new app if you’re sure you’ll need access to the native layer of the app. In the React Native community, an app created with this method is said to be a pure React Native app, since all of the development and Native code files are exposed to the developer. While this provides the most freedom, it also forces the developer to maintain the native code. If you’re a JavaScript developer that’s jumped onto the React Native bandwagon because you intend on writing native applications solely with JavaScript, having to maintain the native code in a React Native project is probably the biggest disadvantage of this method. On the other hand, you’ll have access to third-party plugins when working on an app that’s been bootstrapped with the following command: react-native init Get direct access to the native portion of the code base. You’ll also be able to sidestep a few of the limitations in Expo currently, particularly the inability to use background audio or background GPS services. CocoaPods Once you begin working with apps that have components that use native code, you’re going to be using CocoaPods in your development as well. CocoaPods is a dependency manager for Swift and Objective-C Cocoa projects. It works nearly the same as npm, but manages open source dependencies for native iOS code instead of JavaScript code. We won’t be using CocoaPods much in this book, but React Native makes use of CocoaPods for some of its iOS integration, so having a basic understanding of the manager can be helpful. Just as the package.json file houses all of the packages for a JavaScript project managed with npm, CocoaPods uses a Podfile for listing a project’s iOS dependencies. Likewise, these dependencies can be installed using the command: pod install Ruby is required for CocoaPods to run. Run the command at the command line to verify Ruby is already installed: ruby -v If not, it can be installed with Homebrew with the command: brew install ruby Once Ruby has been installed, CocoaPods can be installed via the command: sudo gem install cocoapods If you encounter any issues while installing, you can read the official CocoaPods Getting Started guide at https://guides.cocoapods.org/using/getting-started.html. Planning your app and choosing your workflow When trying to choose which development workflow best fits your app’s needs, here are a few things you should consider: Will I need access to the native portion of the code base? Will I need any third-party packages in my app that are not supported by Expo? Will my app need to play audio while it is not in the foreground? Will my app need location services while it is not in the foreground? Will I need push notification support? Am I comfortable working, at least nominally, in Xcode and Android Studio? In my experience, Expo usually serves as the best starting place. It provides a lot of benefits to the development process, and gives you an escape hatch in the eject process if your app grows beyond the original requirements. I would recommend only starting development with the React Native CLI if you’re sure your app needs something that cannot be provided by an Expo app, or if you’re sure you will need to work on the Native code. I also recommend browsing the Native Directory hosted at http://native.directory. This site has a very large catalog of the third-party packages available for React Native development. Each package listed on the site has an estimated stability, popularity, and links to documentation. Arguably the best feature of the Native Directory, however, is the ability to filter packages by what kind of device/development they support, including iOS, Android, Expo, and web. This will help you narrow down your package choices and better indicate which workflow should be adopted for a given app. React Native CLI setup We’ll begin with the React Native CLI setup of our app, which will create a new pure React Native app, giving us access to all of the Native code, but also requiring that Xcode and Android Studio are installed. First, we’ll install all the dependencies needed for working with a pure React Native app, starting with the Homebrew (https://brew.sh/) package manager for macOS. As stated on the project’s home page, Homebrew can be easily installed from the Terminal via the following command: /usr/bin/ruby -e “$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)” Once Homebrew is installed, it can be used to install the dependencies needed for React Native development: Node.js and nodemon. If you’re a JavaScript developer, you’ve likely already got Node.js installed. You can check it’s installed via the following command: node -v This command will list the version of Node.js that’s installed, if any. Note that you will need Node.js version 8 or higher for React Native development. If Node.js is not already installed, you can install it with Hombrew via the following command: brew install node We also need the nodemon package, which React Native uses behind the scenes to enable things like live reload during development. Install nodemon with Homebrew via the following command: brew install watchman We’ll also of course need the React Native CLI for running the commands that bootstrap the React Native app. This can be installed globally with npm via the following command: npm install -g react-native-cli With the CLI installed, all it takes to create a new pure React Native app is the following: react-native init name-of-project This will create a new project in a new name-of-project directory. This project has all Native code exposed, and requires Xcode for running the iOS app and Android Studio for running the Android app. Luckily, installing Xcode for supporting iOS React Native development is a simple process. The first step is to download Xcode from the App Store and install it. The second step is to install the Xcode command-line tools. To do this, open Xcode, choose Preferences… from the Xcode menu, open the Locations panel, and install the most recent version from the Command Line Tools dropdown: Unfortunately, setting up Android Studio for supporting Android React Native development is not as cut and dry, and requires some very specific steps for installing it. Since this process is particularly involved, and since there is some likelihood that the process will have changed by the time you read this chapter, I recommend referring to the official documentation for in-depth, up-to-date instructions on installing all Android development dependencies. These instructions are hosted at the following URL: https://facebook.github.io/react-native/docs/getting-started.html#java-development-kit Now that all dependencies have been installed, we’re able to run our pure React Native project via the command line. The iOS app can be executed via the following: react-native run-ios And the Andriod app can be started with this: react-native run-android Each of these commands should start up the associated emulator for the correct platform, install our new app, and run the app within the emulator. If you have any trouble with either of these commands not behaving as expected, you might be able to find an answer in the React Native troubleshooting docs, hosted here: https://facebook.github.io/react-native/docs/troubleshooting.html#content Expo CLI setup The Expo CLI can be installed using the Terminal with npm via the following command: npm install -g expo The Expo CLI can be used to do all the great things the Expo GUI client can do. For all the commands that can be run with the CLI, check out the docs here: https://docs.expo.io/versions/latest/workflow/expo-cli If you liked this post, support the author by reading the book React Native Cookbook, Second Edition for enhancing your React Native mobile development skills. Read Next React Native 0.59 is now out with React Hooks, updated JavaScriptCore, and more! React Native community announce March updates, post sharing the roadmap for Q4 How to create a native mobile app with React Native [Tutorial]last_img read more

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