Bryan was a bustling centre who played 17 games f

first_imgBryan was a bustling centre, who played 17 games for the Saints during the latter part of the 1963-64 season, after his signing from Keighley, writes Alex Service.He had begun his career at York and made his Saints’ debut in the home game against Hull KR at Knowsley Road on February 1 1964. He was in his customary left centre position and scored a try in Saints’ 9-5 victory.His winger that afternoon was Peter Harvey.“Bryan was a big, rough centre and could run,” he said. “I think he played against us earlier in the season and made a big impression, which was one reason why he was signed. Bryan was a different player to the centres we had at the time, namely Cen Williams and Keith Northey and certainly gave coach Stan McCormick greater scope for the backs.“He was a nice bloke, too, who did the job he was signed for.”Indeed Bryan scored five tries and kicked seven goals in his relatively short stay at Knowsley Road. His last match was at Castleford on May 27 1964, a 10-11 reversal at Wheldon Road, when coach Stan McCormick was told that his services would not be required for the following season.In this game, Bryan’s wing partner was someone who would become a fixture in the centres himself in the future: Billy Benyon.Bryan went on to join the re-formed Bradford Northern club and went on to represent Yorkshire although he also played at various times for Halifax and Huddersfield.Eventually he migrated to Australia, in the mid-1970s, where his rugby league odyssey continued. He played in and coached teams in Northern Queensland, before moving to Western Australia and later, he became Head Coach at Port Kembla.He lived his final years in Aberglasslyn.We would like to thank his son, Wayne, for telling us about his father’s passing and all at the St. Helens club send their condolences to his family at this sad time.last_img read more

See More

Rice Faculty Resources on Black History Month

first_imgAddThis Share Contact: Winston DerdenPhone: (713) 831-4793 Rice Faculty Resources on Black History Month February is celebrated nationally as Black History Month. Rice University has a number of experts in various fields related to the history and accomplishments of AfricanAmericans who are available for comment. These scholars include: Catherine Clack, Director of the Office of Multicultural Affairs, (713) 285-5124 or 527-8101, ext. 2684, deals with issues of ethnic diversity, minority recruitment, and campus programs forminority students. Lucie Fultz, assistant professor of English, (713) 527-8101, ext. 2637, is an authority on African-American literature who has done extensive scholarship on the works of black author ToniMorrison. George Smith, professor of art, (713) 527-8101, ext. 3450 is an artist and sculptor whose work draws from African and African-American influences. Chandler Davidson, professor of sociology, (713) 527-8101, ext. 3490, is a nationally recognized authority on racial discrimination,desegregation, and affirmative action initiatives. Earl Black, Herbert S. Autrey Professor of Political Science, (713) 527-4686, specializes in the politics of the South and is a preeminent authority on Southern politics, including the role of blacks in the political process. He is the author of Southern Governors and Civil Rights, and with his brother Merle, The Vital South: How residents Are Elected and Politics and Society in theSouth. John Boles, Allyn and Gladys Cline Professor of History, (713) 527-6039 or 527-8101, ext. 2460, Boles specializes in the history of the American South in the 17th and 18th centuries. His recent book The South Through Time: A History of an American Region is a review of Southern history that includes an analysis of the blackexperience in the Old South. Any of these professors can be reached at the office numbers listed above, or interview arrangements can be made by contacting Winston Derden in the Rice University News Office at 831-4793.last_img read more

See More