Round-up: Jose unhappy, U-19s score seven, QPR boost, Bees win, Fulham draw

first_imgMourinho made changes at the breakJose Mourinho criticised his players after their 1-1 draw with Maribor in the Champions League.Nemanja Matic hauled them level and Eden Hazard missed a late penalty for the Blues, and Mourinho was far from happy with the team’s first-half display.Earlier in the day, Chelsea’s youngsters continued a remarkable run of high-scoring victories by crushing Maribor 7-0 in the Uefa Youth League.Another Chelsea youngster, in-form striker Patrick Bamford, believes his patience during his season-long loan at Middlesbrough is being rewarded.The Bees saw off ForestBrentford enjoyed a cracking victory, beating Nottingham Forest 3-1 at the City Ground.It means Stuart Pearce is without a win in 10 games, but the Hammersmith-born Forest boss believes he will be given time to turn things around at the City Ground. And Fulham came from two down to draw 2-2 against 10-man Blackpool at Craven Cottage.QPR look set for some good news, with Joey Barton, Jordon Mutch and Nedum Onuoha all appearing to be on course to return to the squad for Saturday’s game against Manchester City.Bobby Zamora could return to the starting line-up despite an ongoing hip condition which boss Harry Redknapp says meant the striker “could hardly walk” after the recent win against Aston Villa.There continues to be speculation over Jermain Defoe’s QPR wages ahead of his anticipated move to Loftus Road. The Daily Mirror have claimed he will be paid £80,000 a week.Meanwhile, QPR old boys Gary Waddock and Martin Allen have been reunited at Barnet. Manager Allen has added Waddock to his coaching staff at the Conference club.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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SA to host women’s cricket challenge

first_imgLocal cricketer Olivia Anderson is making a name for herself in England. (Image: Cricinfo) South Africa was recently chosen to host the inaugural ICC Women’s Cricket Challenge, which will take place in Potchefstroom, North West province, from 6 to 16 October 2010.The tournament will be played under the auspices of the International Cricket Council (ICC), with Cricket South Africa (CSA) as the official host.According to the ICC, the challenge will take the form of all-women teams, currently ranked between fifth and 10th in the world, competing in a series of one day intenational (ODI) and Twenty20 fixtures. Countries in the line-up are South Africa, the Netherlands, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Ireland.“This tournament is an ideal way for the women’s teams ranked outside of the top four to gain more match experience in both ODI and Twenty20 formats,” ICC global development manager Matthew Kennedy said in a statement.The first round of the challenge will consist of ODIs, while the spectators’ favourite – the Twenty20 games – will begin on 14 October. Most of the matches will be played at the North West University’s Potchefstroom campus.It’s hoped the October competition will shake up women’s ODI rankings and enable some of the competing countries to qualify for the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup to be played in India in 2013.“The tournament will also provide a good challenge for all six competing teams, as none of them has yet qualified for the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup,” Kennedy said.The top-four women ODI teams – England, New Zealand, India and defending champions Australia – have already qualified for the World Cup, which features eight nations.South Africa participated in the 2009 World Cup held in Australia, and hosted it in 2005.The country’s female players are expected to perform well in the African qualifier games, which will wrap up in December 2010.The final international qualifiers, to be held in Bangladesh in November 2011, will see 10 nations battle it out for the four remaining World Cup spots.SA women on a good wicketSouth Africa’s first national women’s cricket squad was selected in 1997 and since then the country taken bold steps to develop the sport for females – this includes setting up the Cricket South Africa Women’s Cricket Committee.Women’s cricket gained further momentum in South Africa at the start of the millennium when competitions such as the interprovincial league were initiated. In the early 2000s more than 9 000 females from 1 109 schools and 269 clubs were playing cricket, according to CSA.Local batswoman Olivia Anderson, who debuted for South Africa in 2008, is currently making a name for herself in the UK playing for Shepperton Cricket Club. She’s racked up 1 000 runs this season, after scoring 76 off 66 balls in a match against Purley Redoubtables on 8 August.Although the final player selections for the October challenge have yet to be announced, Anderson is one of the favourites for the South African squad.last_img read more

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Don’t Try This At Home: Armchair Building Science

first_imgThe homeowners called me after a certified home inspector stated that the attic was underventilated and moisture was building up as a result. The roof assembly had soffit vents at the eaves and two gable-end vents. These vents would not be as effective as ridge-to-soffit ventilation, but were probably close to building code requirements (see Green Basics – Attics).I did not have the time to get down to the home to take a look myself, so I asked the homeowner to send me photos of the house and the problem. It’s a bit dicey to diagnose a problem and give guidance over the phone based on a short series of photos, but armchair building science is an honorable pastime.What does the pattern of mold suggest to you? It sure looks localized to me. When asked how many “spots” of mold there were in the attic and where they were located, the homeowner replied that the two most prominent areas of attic mold were located just above two doors that separated living space from a kneewall partition forming unfinished closets. Aha! Warm, moisture-laden air was leaking into the attic at the doors and condensing on the cold plywood. I recommended that the homeowners confirm the air-leakage diagnosis with some performance testing and likely air-sealing resolution.So how did we do?Mark Lance (BPI-Certified) of Cozy Home Performance conducted a blower-door test on the home to quantify the air leakage and assess the location of big holes. The home was very leaky (CFM50 – 5300)1. The mold and air leakage in the attic turned out not to be focused on the kneewall closet doors but was more widespread throughout the attic. So we got the air leakage right — just not how extensive it was.More attic ventilation would not have solved this mold and moisture problem; extensive air sealing will (and will reduce the homeowner’s energy bills as well), however. Had the solution to increase attic ventilation taken the form of an attic exhaust fan, it may have increased the air leakage and moisture problem.Get the right stuffMake sure that the folks evaluating your home have the right training and experience. In this case, the difference between a certified building performance professional and a certified home inspector proved to be the difference between getting it right and getting it wrong.……………………………………………1CFM50 – 5300 means that the blower door was pulling 5,300 cubic feet of air per minute out of the house when the blower door was creating a pressure difference of 50 pascals between the inside and outside of the house. For a home of this size (1,800 sq. ft. or so), that is pretty darn leaky, but not unusual for homes with little air sealing.last_img read more

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A Higher Standard

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in For a number of years, Rob and Fiona were content to live in a simple Maine cottage a stone’s throw from the water’s edge. In recent years, however, they had tried having a new house designed to accommodate their changing needs, but quickly got mired in results that were much larger and more expensive than what they wanted. After tiring of these unsuccessful ventures, they came to my firm seeking a compact, modern, extremely energy-efficient home that would blend into the tightly woven neighborhood where they planned to root themselves for the years to come.We set to work applying our studio’s motto—beautiful, sustainable, attainable—to the project. Our early meetings quickly centered on the meaning of cottage in the 21st century. We wondered if the term still defined the classic British buildings of Rob and Fiona’s youth, which so successfully fit between clusters of lavender and privet hedges, or if cottage had come to mean something bolder and simpler with less of the romantic touchstones of 19thcentury construction. We concluded that we needed to draw on each of these ideas, and that the house would need to be simple, tough, and practical, in keeping with the Maine life that Rob and Fiona love. Double-duty design. The home’s front (photo above) is simple and traditional in detail and scale to fit its setting, while its back rises dramatically to capture light and views. We thought that a house approximately 1800 sq. ft. in size would be able to meet their budget and allow for the quality of design and construction they desired. Early on, it became evident that their goals included very low energy use, nontoxic materials, a quiet and simple aesthetic, bedrooms that faced the water,… center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

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Next generation hoping to make their mark at Wimbledon

first_imgFrom Boris Becker’s acrobatics in 1985 to Roger Federer’s languid brilliance in 2003, Wimbledon has provided the stage for many of tennis’s most formidable tyros to secure a maiden grand slam trophy.Yet since Federer clinched the first of his seven Wimbledon crowns, nobody outside of tennis’s so-called big four has had a look-in at the All England Club with the Swiss, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray sweeping all before them.A quick glance at the bookmakers’ favourites for this year’s title shows few expect tennis’s kings of the court to be dethroned any time soon.Yet with the world’s current top five all now in their thirties, perhaps this is the year for a new generation to announce their arrival. (Early attack still pays dividends at Wimbledon)Below we take a look at some of the up-and-comers who could cause an upset.Alexander Zverev (Germany)Age 20, ranked 12Zverev’s swashbuckling game has already seen him tipped as a future grand slam champion and he comes into Wimbledon with some pedigree, having won three tour titles this year.The younger brother of world number 30 Mischa, Zverev showed his grasscourt prowess by reaching the final at Halle only to lose in straight sets to Federer, who he beat at the same event last year.His season, however, has not been an unmitigated success: Days after beating Djokovic to win the Rome Masters, he crashed out of the French Open in the first round to Fernando Verdasco.Dominic Thiem (Austria)Age 23, ranked 8With his single-handed backhand, Austria’s Dominic Thiem boasts one of the best shots in men’s tennis, and another impressive claycourt season saw him emerge as the only person to beat Nadal on his beloved red dust this year.advertisementEn route to the French Open semi-finals for a second straight year, Thiem destroyed Djokovic, winning the third set 6-0 in 20 minutes, to further underline his growing stature in the game.Reuters PhotoQuestions remain, however, as to whether the claycourt specialist, who often stands deep behind the baseline to receive serve, can adapt to the slick lawns at SW19, where he has never gone past the second round.Lucas Pouille (France)Age 23, ranked 15Pouille made his mark when he ousted Nadal from last year’s U.S. Open in a pulsating four-hour, fourth-round upset.That led the now 15-times grand slam champion to remark that Pouille “could fight for the big things the next couple of years”.The Frenchman’s grasscourt pedigree looks good after he reached the quarter-finals at the All England Club last year, and he underlined his progress by claiming his second tour title of the season at the Wimbledon warmup event in Stuttgart.Nick Kyrgios (Australia)Age 22, ranked 20Nick Kyrgios’s three appearances at Wimbledon could be viewed as his fledgling career in microcosm.It is three years since he gave an early glimpse of the irresistible power at his disposal to blow then world number one Nadal off Centre Court in one of the most extraordinary upsets in the tournament’s modern history.Reuters PhotoSince then, however, his progress seems to have stuttered amid criticism of his attitude, behaviour and commitment.He faced accusations of tanking at Wimbledon in 2015 in a fourth round loss to Richard Gasquet, while his defeat to Andy Murray 12 months ago prompted John McEnroe to criticise his temperament.Borna Coric (Croatia)Age 20, ranked 42Having reached a career-high 33 in the world in 2015 Coric is one of several young players who have been tipped for great things but have found the next step tricky.He slumped to 79 in the rankings earlier this year, but then claimed his first ATP title in Marrakesh in April.Hyeon Chung (South Korea)Age 21, ranked 54Hyeon Chung has little pedigree on grass, but he is among the brightest young talents in the game. He showed a glimpse of his potential when he took Kei Nishikori to five sets in the third round of the French Open, his best grand slam performance.Reuters PhotoDenis Shapovalov (Canada)Age 18, ranked 164Wimbledon junior champion Denis Shapovalov sneaked into this year’s main draw with a wildcard, but is undoubtedly a promising talent.He beat Britain’s Kyle Edmund to reach the second round at Queen’s before pushing former Wimbledon finalist Tomas Berdych to the limit in an enthralling three-set defeat.The Canadian made headlines earlier this year when he was disqualified for striking umpire Arnaud Gabas in the eye with a ball after hitting it aimlessly towards the crowd during a Davis Cup tie against Britain.last_img read more

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