House approves Runestad bill cracking down on corrupt process servers

first_img27Feb House approves Runestad bill cracking down on corrupt process servers State Rep. Jim Runestad’s legislation creating more accountability for officials tasked with serving legal notices was approved today by the Michigan House.Runestad, of White Lake, said ensuring people are given proper notice of court proceedings is fundamental to their due process rights.“Our judicial system relies on process servers to do their jobs honestly and effectively,” Runestad said. “Falsely claiming to serve a legal notice can have serious consequences. We need to make sure process servers understand the magnitude of their responsibilities.”Under current law, unethical process servers are almost never held accountable in court.“In rare situations they may be held in contempt of court, which usually results in a fine or, at most, 90 days in jail,” Runestad said.House Bills 4666, sponsored by Runestad, and 4670, sponsored by Rep. Joe Bellino, of Monroe, classify the false certification of personal service as a felony.“Our legislation creates a declaration process servers must sign under penalty of perjury, a crime punishable by up to 15 years in prison,” Runestad said. “This sends a clear message that process servers must do their due diligence and ensures fraudulent service is prosecuted in Michigan.”Runestad said stories like those of Detroit resident Carnell Alexander inspired him to introduce the legislation.Alexander, who testified before the House Judiciary Committee in support of the bill, said 29 years ago a process server claimed to serve him at his father’s house with paperwork related to a child support claim. He was incarcerated at the time, and never received notice of the court proceedings. As a result, Alexander said he was ordered to pay more than $130,000 in child support for a child who isn’t his.“I’m very happy to hear this legislation has passed,” Alexander said today. “I believe the process server should be held accountable on making sure papers are properly delivered, and that there are no discrepancies.”Jeff Kirkpatrick, vice president of the Michigan Court Officers, Deputy Sheriffs and Process Servers’ Association, praised Runestad for taking the lead on the legislation.“Michigan citizens have found their bank accounts frozen, their wages garnished or their property seized, all because a few unscrupulous process servers file false proofs of service with the court,” Kirkpatrick said. “Our association, like Rep. Runestad, wants to stop this practice in Michigan. House Bill 4666, making it a felony to sign a false proof of service, is a great first step.”The bills now move to the Senate for consideration.### Categories: Runestad Newslast_img read more

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UPC Poland CEO Ramiro Lafarga Brollo is to leave h

first_imgUPC Poland CEO Ramiro Lafarga Brollo is to leave his post to take on a role outside Liberty Global, the Polish cable operator’s owner.Liberty Global did not provide further information on the reasons for Lafarga Brollo’s move, or on who would replace him.The company said that Lafarga Brollo had significantly contributed to the development of UPC Poland, including the launch of the Horizon advanced TV platform, since he took on his role in July 2014.Lafarga Brollo said that he was happy to report that after a year and a half in his post the operator had reinforced its position and had maintained its leading position in infrastructure, product innovation, its competitive offering and high quality customer service.Lafarga Brollo was previously CEO of O2 Slovakia.His move is the latest in a series of senior management changes at Liberty Global’s central and eastern European operations. In June, the company named UPC Romania and Hungary CEO Severina Pascu as head of the entire CEE region, replacing Betzalel Kenigstein. She was replaced as Romanian chief executive by CMO Robert Redeleanu.UPC Poland named former Orange Poland executive Tomasz Izydorczyk as marketing director and Zoltan Bodnar as finance director in September.last_img read more

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France Télévisions boss Delphine Ernotte plans to

first_imgFrance Télévisions boss Delphine Ernotte plans to cut 180 posts as part of a cost-saving drive in the face of the latest wave of cuts to the public broadcaster’s budget, according to a report in the Journal du Dimanche.Delphine ErnotteFaced with a rebellion by journalists at the end of last month over plans to reduce the frequency of two news magazine shows on flagship channel France 2, Envoyé Special and Complément d’Enquête, the pubcaster’s management have scaled back their plans for cuts in the news arena, according to the report. Thirty news posts are now expected to go, including four across the two news magazines, saving some €5 million in total.Overall, tasked with finding up to €75 million in additional cost savings imposed by the new French government, Ernotte has proposed cuts of 180 posts. Half of all staff retiring will not be replaced, a measure that should provide a further €20 million in savings.France Télévisions could also cut back on sport commitments, including deciding not to air the 2024 Olympic Games as well as, potentially, coverage of French football.The pubcaster may also look to cut production spend on live entertainment programming by 4% and increase the number of repeats on its different channels. Other measures include renegotiating contracts to lower transmission costs, dropping a contract with Médiametrie to measure the audience of overseas service France O, and selling off facilities in Paris and Boulogne-Billancourt.last_img read more

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